Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.)

*IMPORTANT Note About the Doctor of Philosophy in Cellular and Structural Biology Degree*
This program is no longer accepting students at this time as this field of study is now a discipline within the new Integrated Biomedical Sciences (IBMS) Program. All information in this section of the Catalog is for the current Cellular and Structural Biology students only.

The graduate program in Cellular and Structural Biology provides a rewarding opportunity for students wishing to pursue a Ph.D. degree for preparation for a fulfilling career in biomedicine. 

The strength of our program is its diversity; faculty are performing state-of-the-art research in areas of animal models of human disease, cancer biology, stem cell biology, development and reproduction, molecular basis of aging, molecular genetics as well as neurobiology and endocrinology. The curriculum and research experience is aimed at producing trainees armed with critical thinking skills, competent in contemporary techniques and with broad scholarly background to become independent investigators, capable of designing and executing programs of excellence in research and teaching. All graduate students pursue a program of study designed to develop both their scholarly and laboratory aptitudes through one-on-one mentoring by members of the graduate faculty. In addition, in-depth instruction is also provided on effective seminar presentation as well as grant and manuscript preparation.

Cellular and Structural Biology Degree Requirements

A minimum of 72 credit hours and a minimum overall GPA of 3.0 is required for the Ph.D. degree.  In addition, all doctoral candidates must register for the CSBL 7099 Dissertation for at least two semesters in order to graduate.  The student is required to demonstrate intellectual command of the subject area of the graduate program and capability to carry out independent and original investigation in the area. The student must successfully defend a dissertation and be recommended by their program Committee on Graduate Studies (COGS) for approval of their degree to the Dean of the Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences. 

Biology of Aging Track- Plan of Study

First Year
FallCredit Hours
IBMS 5000Fundamentals Of Biomedical Sciences 8
CSBL 6097Research 1-12
INTD 5082Responsible Conduct of Research 1.5
 Total Credit Hours: 10.5-21.5
First Year
SpringCredit Hours
CSBL 5089Graduate Colloquium 2
CSBL 5095Experimental Design And Data Analysis 3
CSBL 6097Research 1-12
CSBL 6049Cellular and Molecular Mechanisms of Aging 2
CSBL 6050Aging and Longevity Mechanisms 2
 Total Credit Hours: 10.0-21.0
Second Year
FallCredit Hours
CSBL 5077Scientific Writing 2
CSBL 6090Seminar 1-9
CSBL 6097Research 1-12
 Total Credit Hours: 4.0-23.0
Second Year
SpringCredit Hours
CSBL 6090Seminar 1-9
CSBL 6097Research 1-12
 Total Credit Hours: 2.0-21.0
Third Year
FallCredit Hours
CSBL 6090Seminar 1-9
CSBL 6097Research 1-12
CSBL 6071Supervised Teaching 1-12
 Total Credit Hours: 3.0-33.0
Third Year
SpringCredit Hours
CSBL 6090Seminar 1-9
CSBL 6097Research 1-12
Elective  3
 Total Credit Hours: 5.0-24.0
Fourth Year
FallCredit Hours
CSBL 6090Seminar 1-9
CSBL 7099Dissertation 0.5-12
 Total Credit Hours: 1.5-21.0
Fourth Year
SpringCredit Hours
CSBL 6090Seminar 1-9
CSBL 7099Dissertation 0.5-12
 Total Credit Hours: 1.5-21.0
Fifth Year
FallCredit Hours
CSBL 6090Seminar 1-9
CSBL 7099Dissertation 0.5-12
 Total Credit Hours: 1.5-21.0
Fifth Year
SpringCredit Hours
CSBL 6090Seminar 1-9
CSBL 7099Dissertation 0.5-12
 Total Credit Hours: 1.5-21.0

All students admitted to PhD Candidacy no longer register for CSBL 6097 Research.  They will register for CSBL 7099 Dissertation.

CSBL 6049 (2 SCH) & CSBL 6050 (2 SCH) together constitute the Biology of Aging core courses that is mandatory for all Biology of Aging students.  Biology of Aging students do not register for each individually. Rather, students take CSBL 6048 (4SCH), which is a combination of both CSBL 6049 and CSBL 6050. However, students in other tracks can take either or both of the 2 courses as electives in the same semester or in separate semesters. 

Cancer Biology Track- Plan of Study

First Year
FallCredit Hours
IBMS 5000Fundamentals Of Biomedical Sciences 8
INTD 5082Responsible Conduct of Research 1.5
CSBL 6097Research 1-12
 Total Credit Hours: 10.5-21.5
First Year
SpringCredit Hours
CSBL 6068Cancer Biology Core 1; An Introductory course 1
CSBL 6069Cancer Biology Core 2; Advanced Cancer Biology 2.5
CSBL 5089Graduate Colloquium 2
CSBL 6097Research 1-12
CSBL 5095Experimental Design And Data Analysis 3
 Total Credit Hours: 9.5-20.5
Second Year
FallCredit Hours
CSBL 5077Scientific Writing 2
CSBL 6097Research 1-12
CSBL 6090Seminar 1-9
 Total Credit Hours: 4.0-23.0
Second Year
SpringCredit Hours
CSBL 6090Seminar 1-9
CSBL 6097Research 1-12
 Total Credit Hours: 2.0-21.0
Third Year
FallCredit Hours
Elective(s) see department  3
CSBL 6097Research 1-12
CSBL 6090Seminar 1-9
 Total Credit Hours: 5.0-24.0
Third Year
SpringCredit Hours
Elective(s) see department  3
CSBL 6097Research 1-12
CSBL 6090Seminar 1-9
 Total Credit Hours: 5.0-24.0
Fourth Year
FallCredit Hours
CSBL 7099Dissertation 0.5-12
CSBL 6090Seminar 1-9
 Total Credit Hours: 1.5-21.0
Fourth Year
SpringCredit Hours
Elective(s) see department  3
CSBL 6090Seminar 1-9
CSBL 7099Dissertation 0.5-12
 Total Credit Hours: 4.5-24.0
Fifth Year
FallCredit Hours
CSBL 7099Dissertation 0.5-12
CSBL 6090Seminar 1-9
 Total Credit Hours: 1.5-21.0
Fifth Year
SpringCredit Hours
CSBL 7099Dissertation 0.5-12
CSBL 6090Seminar 1-9
 Total Credit Hours: 1.5-21.0

All students admitted to PhD Candidacy no longer register for CSBL 6097 Research.  They will register for CSBL 7099 Dissertation.

CSBL 6068 (2 SCH) & CSBL 6069 (2 SCH) together constitute the Cancer Biology core course that is mandatory for all Cancer Biology students.  However, students in other tracks can take either or both of the 2 courses as electives in the same semester or in separate semesters.

 Cellular and Molecular Medicine Track - Plan of Study1

First Year
FallCredit Hours
IBMS 5000Fundamentals Of Biomedical Sciences 8
INTD 5082Responsible Conduct of Research 1.5
CSBL 6097Research 1-12
 Total Credit Hours: 10.5-21.5
First Year
SpringCredit Hours
CSBL 5089Graduate Colloquium 2
CSBL 6097Research 1-12
CSBL 5095Experimental Design And Data Analysis 3
INTD 6007Advanced Cell Biology 2
INTD 6009Advanced Molecular Biology 2
 Total Credit Hours: 10.0-21.0
Second Year
FallCredit Hours
CSBL 5077Scientific Writing 2
INTD 6008Mitochondria & Apoptosis 1
CSBL 6090Seminar 1-9
CSBL 5007Methods In Cell Biology 1
CSBL 5083Practical Optical Microscopy 1
CSBL 6097Research 1-12
 Total Credit Hours: 7.0-26.0
Second Year
SpringCredit Hours
CSBL 6090Seminar 1-9
CSBL 6097Research 1-12
 Total Credit Hours: 2.0-21.0
Third Year
FallCredit Hours
CSBL 6090Seminar 1-9
CSBL 6097Research 1-12
CSBL 6071Supervised Teaching 1-12
 Total Credit Hours: 3.0-33.0
Third Year
SpringCredit Hours
CSBL 6090Seminar 1-9
CSBL 6097Research 1-12
 Total Credit Hours: 2.0-21.0
Fourth Year
FallCredit Hours
CSBL 6090Seminar 1-9
CSBL 7099Dissertation 0.5-12
 Total Credit Hours: 1.5-21.0
Fourth Year
SpringCredit Hours
CSBL 6090Seminar 1-9
CSBL 7099Dissertation 0.5-12
 Total Credit Hours: 1.5-21.0
Fifth Year
FallCredit Hours
CSBL 6090Seminar 1-9
CSBL 7099Dissertation 0.5-12
 Total Credit Hours: 1.5-21.0
Fifth Year
SpringCredit Hours
CSBL 7099Dissertation 0.5-12
CSBL 6090Seminar 1-9
 Total Credit Hours: 1.5-21.0

   1 Students can tailor the required coursework for the CMM track to their specific interests including aging, cancer, immunology, neuroscience, metabolism and genetic disorders. They have two options to fulfill the 4-credit advanced course requirement:

      Option 1: Take the full course (INTD 5007 Advanced Cellular and Molecular Biology), which is a combination of INTD 6009 & INTD 6007.

      Option 2: Take only one of the advanced course modules, either INTD 6009 Advanced Molecular Biology (2 credits) or INTD 6007 Advanced Cell Biology (2 credits), then add 2 credit hours of required core coursework from any of the other IMGP tracks (list provided below).

These changes provide CMM students with the greatest flexibility, while emphasizing the importance of molecular and cellular approaches to studying health and disease.

 Genomics, Genetics & Development Track - Plan of Study

First Year
FallCredit Hours
IBMS 5000Fundamentals Of Biomedical Sciences 8
INTD 5082Responsible Conduct of Research 1.5
CSBL 6097Research 1-12
 Total Credit Hours: 10.5-21.5
First Year
SpringCredit Hours
CSBL 5023Development 1
CSBL 5024Genomics 1
CSBL 5025Genetics 1
CSBL 6059Stem Cells & Regenerative Medicine 1
CSBL 5089Graduate Colloquium 2
CSBL 6097Research 1-12
CSBL 5095Experimental Design And Data Analysis 3
 Total Credit Hours: 10.0-21.0
Second Year
FallCredit Hours
CSBL 5077Scientific Writing 2
CSBL 6090Seminar 1-9
CSBL 6097Research 1-12
 Total Credit Hours: 4.0-23.0
Second Year
SpringCredit Hours
CSBL 6090Seminar 1-9
CSBL 6097Research 1-12
 Total Credit Hours: 2.0-21.0
Third Year
FallCredit Hours
Elective(s) see department  3
CSBL 6097Research 1-12
CSBL 6090Seminar 1-9
 Total Credit Hours: 5.0-24.0
Third Year
SpringCredit Hours
Elective(s) see department  3
CSBL 6097Research 1-12
CSBL 6090Seminar 1-9
 Total Credit Hours: 5.0-24.0
Fourth Year
FallCredit Hours
CSBL 6071Supervised Teaching 1-12
CSBL 7099Dissertation 0.5-12
CSBL 6090Seminar 1-9
 Total Credit Hours: 2.5-33.0
Fourth Year
SpringCredit Hours
Elective(s) see department  3
CSBL 6090Seminar 1-9
CSBL 7099Dissertation 0.5-12
 Total Credit Hours: 4.5-24.0
Fifth Year
FallCredit Hours
CSBL 7099Dissertation 0.5-12
CSBL 6090Seminar 1-9
 Total Credit Hours: 1.5-21.0
Fifth Year
SpringCredit Hours
CSBL 6090Seminar 1-9
CSBL 7099Dissertation 0.5-12
 Total Credit Hours: 1.5-21.0

      All students admitted to PhD Candidacy no longer register for CSBL 6097 Research.  They will register for CSBL 7099 Dissertation.

      CSBL 5023 (1 SCH), CSBL 5024 (1 SCH), CSBL 5025 (1 SCH) and CSBL 6059 (1 SCH) together constitute the Genomics, Genetics & Development Track core course that is mandatory for all Genomics, Genetics &       Development students. Genomics, Genetics & Development students do not register for each individually. Rather, students take CSBL 6064 (4SCH), which is a combination of CSBL 5023, CSBL 5024, CSBL 5025           and CSBL 6059. However, students in other tracks can take either or both of the 2 courses as electives in the same semester or in separate semesters. 

Cellular and Structural Biology Objectives/Program Outcomes

Students in the CSB graduate program will have the ability to review, interpret and critically evaluate scientific literature related to areas of biomedical science relevant to cellular and molecular biology in general and specifically to their project. Students will be trained to review and interpret original scientific literature through coursework and in their research.

Students in the CSB graduate program will have the ability to conduct original biomedical research. Students in the program will be able to analyze, plan, organize, and conduct high-quality biomedical research under the direction of supervising professors and guidance of research advisory (dissertation/thesis) committees as appropriate.

Students in the CSB graduate program will have the ability to communicate effectively in written and verbal presentations. Students will learn to effectively communicate ideas in written format via coursework, examinations and their research and to communicate ideas/concepts in verbal presentations during progress report seminars, research advisory committee meetings, oral examinations/defenses, and participation in scientific meetings.

Students in the CSB graduate program will demonstrate foundational knowledge and expertise in a select area appropriate to the research project. Students will be able to define, explain, and apply key concepts and fundamental principles related to the areas of biomedical science relevant to their track and to their specific research projects.

Students in the CSB graduate program will demonstrate fundamental knowledge of ethics in biomedical research. Students will be able to recognize ethical dilemmas and behave in accordance with ethical standards of conduct in the design, implementation, analysis, and dissemination of scientific research.

IBMS 5000. Fundamentals Of Biomedical Sciences. 8 Credit Hours.

This core course covers the fundamentals of biochemistry, molecular biology, cell biology, organismal and systems biology, and microbiology and immunology. The course is designed for first-year graduate students matriculating into the Integrated Biomedical Sciences Program (IBMS).

INTD 5007. Advanced Cellular And Molecular Biology. 4 Credit Hours.

This course provides an in-depth learning experience that instructs students on the fundamentals of molecular biology and cell biology as well as prepares the student to evaluate and design new research in the cutting-edge areas of modern molecular biology and cell biology. The course combines a didactic program of lectures along with a small group discussion format in which students interact closely with a group of faculty who have active research programs. The course focuses on active areas of research in molecular biology: Chromatin structure, DNA Transcription, DNA Replication and Repair, Recombination, RNA processing and regulation, Protein processing, targeting and degradation and in cell biology: Cell Signaling and Communication, Cell Growth, and Cell Death. Each week, the faculty provide students with didactic lectures on a current research area. Students and faculty will then jointly discuss key publications that serve to bridge the gap between the fundamental underpinnings of the field and the state of the art in that area.

INTD 6007. Advanced Cell Biology. 2 Credit Hours.

This course provides an in-depth learning experience that instructs students on the fundamentals of cell biology as well as prepares the student to evaluate and design new research in the cutting-edge areas of modern cell biology. The course combines a didactic program of lectures along with a small-group discussion format in which students interact closely with a group of faculty who have active research programs. The course focuses on active areas of research in cell biology: Cell Signaling and Communication, Cell Growth, and Cell Death. Each week, the faculty the jointly discuss key publications that serve the bridge the gap between the fundamental underpinnings of the field and the state of the art in that area. Students and faculty will then jointly discuss key publications that serve to bridge the gap between the fundamental underpinnnings of the field and the state of the art in that area.

INTD 6008. Mitochondria & Apoptosis. 1 Credit Hour.

This course will focus in depth on Mitochondria and Apoptosis. Topics will include: Mitochondria and Respiration; Mitochondria and Reactive Oxygen Species; Mitochondria and Apoptosis. It will provide an opportunity for a unique learning experience where the student can prepare to evaluate and design new research in the cutting-edge areas of modern cell biology and molecular biology. Instead of a didactic program of lectures, the entire course comprises a small-group format in which students interact closely with a group of faculty who have active research programs. Each week, faculty will provide students with a brief overview of the research area. Students and faculty will then jointly discuss key publications that serve to bridge the gap between the student's prior understanding of the field and the state of the art in that area.

INTD 6009. Advanced Molecular Biology. 2 Credit Hours.

This course will provide an in-depth learning experience on the fundamentals of molecular biology as well as prepare the student to evaluate and design new research in the cutting-edge areas of modern molecular biology. The course combines a didactic program of lectures along with a small- group discussion format in which students interact closely with a group of faculty who have active research programs. The course focuses on active areas of research in molecular biology: Chromatin structure, Transcription, DNA Replication and Repair, Recombination, RNA processing and regulation, Protein processing, targeting and degradation. Each week, the faculty provide students with didactic lectures on a current research area. Students and faculty then jointly discuss Key publications that serve to bridge the gap between the fundamental underpinnings of the field and the state of the art in that area.

CSBL 5007. Methods In Cell Biology. 1 Credit Hour.

Through a combination of lectures and demonstrations, the instructors will introduce students to techniques which are currently being used in cellular biology laboratories. The emphasis will be on the applications themselves, their uses, limitations, and the necessary controls. The following topic areas will be covered: imaging and microscopy, immunological techniques, bioinformatics (DNA and protein), rodent anatomy and histology, cytogenetics, and in vitro cell growth and transfection.

CSBL 5077. Scientific Writing. 2 Credit Hours.

This course will provide students with the opportunity to develop skills in scientific writing and the presentation of research results. It will emphasize learning-by-doing-and-re-doing. Students will be required to write something every week. The capstone project for students will be to write a grant proposal and defend it in front of the class. One hour per week will be devoted to lecture and critique of published work; the other hour will consist of critique and revision of student writing by other students, as well as by the course director. Topics to be covered include: (1) fundamentals of writing clearly, (2) principles of revision, (3) effective presentation of data, (4) fundamentals of oral presentation, (5) writing/presenting to the appropriate audience, (6) how to write background/introductory sections, (7) how to write materials and methods, (8) how to write the discussion section, and (9) how to constructively critique one's own and others writing.

CSBL 5083. Practical Optical Microscopy. 1 Credit Hour.

This course will be a one-hour elective for graduate students consisting of eight (8) one-hour lectures plus eight (8) one-hour laboratories. The course focuses on the practical aspects of using optical microscopes. The objectives are to teach students the fundamental principles of optical microscopy and to provide them with hands-on experience using the optical instrumentation in the Institutional Imaging Core.

CSBL 5089. Graduate Colloquium. 2 Credit Hours.

This course is designed to provide graduate students with training in evaluating the scientific literature and in presentation of research in a seminar or journal club format. The course will focus on critical thinking, including evaluation of existing literature, interpretation of experimental results, and comparison of alternative models and interpretations. These tools are essential both for oral presentations and for writing grant proposals and manuscripts. Emphasis will be placed on evaluation of the science, organization of the manuscript, and on oral presentation skills.

CSBL 5095. Experimental Design And Data Analysis. 3 Credit Hours.

The purpose of the course is to provide an introduction to experimental design and statistical analysis. The emphasis of the course will be on the selection and application of proper tests of statistical significance. Practical experience will be provided in the use of both parametric and nonparametric methods of statistical evaluation. Among the topics to be covered are: data reduction, types of distributions, hypothesis testing, scales of measurement, chi square analysis, the special case of the comparison of two groups; analysis of variance; a posteriori multiple comparisons tests, tests of the assumptions of parametric analyses, advanced forms of the analysis of variance, linear regression, and correlation analysis. This course involves the use of statistical software; therefore, access to a laptop or a computer with web access for classes and examinations is required.

CSBL 6049. Cellular and Molecular Mechanisms of Aging. 2 Credit Hours.

This course provides up-to-date information on the current understanding of cellular and molecular mechanisms that contribute to aging. The focus is on investigation of specific mechanisms of aging including oxidative stress, nutrient sensing signaling pathways, stem cells and senescence, and genome stability. Experimental design and analysis, including pros and cons of approaches used to gain knowledge and how to appropriately interpret data, will be discussed throughout the course. The relationship between age-related changes in function and potential contributions age associated diseases will be examined via recently published research.

CSBL 6050. Aging and Longevity Mechanisms. 2 Credit Hours.

This module will focus on and evaluate several approaches used to modulate longevity and how these are used to discover the genetic, physiological and intracellular foundation of aging processes. The course will consist of interactive lectures complemented by guided reading of currently research papers. Students will be taught to hone critical reading skills and develop testable hypotheses to carry research forward. Topics will include: Genetics of Aging, Exceptional Longevity, Pharmacological Interventions, Calorie Restriction, Healthspan and Pathology of Aging.

CSBL 6059. Stem Cells & Regenerative Medicine. 1 Credit Hour.

The fields of stem cells and regenerative medicine are rapidly evolving and have great potential to change the way medicine is practiced. This course will encompass topics from basics of tissue specific stem cell biology to pre-clinical animal models, strategies and progress in regenerative medicine. We will discuss some of the most current research being done in regenerative medicine from stem cell transplantation to biomaterials. Prerequisite: INTD 5000.

CSBL 6064. Genes & Development. 4 Credit Hours.

Genes and Development is the core course of the Genetics, Genomics, and Development Track. The course consists of four modules: genetics, genomics, developmental biology, and stem cell biology. Basic concepts in genetics such as cytogenetics, mitochondrial genetics, cancer genetics, linkage analysis, complex traits, population genetics, animal models, sex determination, and epigenetics will be presented. The genomics section will include historical aspects of the genome project and high throughput analysis. The students are introduced to new techniques in global analysis as well as have hands-on experience. The developmental biology section provides a survey of concepts in developmental biology (induction, cell-cell interactions, morphogen gradients, morphogenetic movements, transcriptional regulation, organogenesis) using experimental examples from both invertebrate and vertebrate embryos. The stem cell biology section includes the following topics: basic biology of stem cells, including embryonic stem cells, adult stem cells, stem cells in different tissues and model systems; microenvironment-mediated and epigenetic regulators of stem cells; stem cells in medicine, including regenerative medicine, cancer, and aging; and ethics. Required for the Genetics, Genomics & Development Track.

CSBL 7099. Dissertation. 0.5-12 Credit Hours.

Registration for at least one term is required of Ph.D. candidates. Prerequisites: admission to candidacy for Doctor of Philosophy degree.

CSBL 6068. Cancer Biology Core 1; An Introductory course. 1 Credit Hour.

This course introduces the key features of cancer biology. In particular this course will provide initial insight into the clinical presentation and the cellular processes involved in cancer biology. In additional will be an initial presentation of molecular oncology. Topics examined include oncogenes, tumor suppressor genes, apoptosis, control of cell cycle regulation, and control of cellular growth and proliferation. Required for Cancer Biology Discipline. Prerequisites: INTD 5007 (or INTD 6007 and INTD 6009).

CSBL 6069. Cancer Biology Core 2; Advanced Cancer Biology. 2.5 Credit Hours.

This course is designed to provide a detailed representation of cancer biology, from progression, standard of care and molecular alterations that drive recent diagnoses and therapeutic strategies. In addition, this course will offer an overview on special populations affected by cancers and models used in the investigation of cancer. Included are basic experimental methods, mouse models, ex vivo systems, molecular profiling and clinical trials. The conceptual notions on clinical trials of cancer drugs and the process of development of novel therapeutic drugs in cancer will be discussed. Required for Cancer Biology Discipline. Prerequisites: INTD 5007 (or INTD 6007 and INTD 6009) and CSBL 6068.

CSBL 6071. Supervised Teaching. 1-12 Credit Hours.

This course consists of participation in the teaching program of the first-year medical, dental, or health professions curriculum. Semester hours vary depending on the time spent in teaching.

CSBL 6090. Seminar. 1-9 Credit Hours.

Attendance and participation in the regularly scheduled department seminar series is required each semester the course is offered. The activities included in the seminar course are attendance at invited seminars, journal club, and the student presentations including student annual progress and final dissertation and thesis presentations.

CSBL 6097. Research. 1-12 Credit Hours.

This course consists of independent, original research under the direction of a faculty advisor.

INTD 5082. Responsible Conduct of Research. 1.5 Credit Hour.

This foundational course introduces students to core ethical content necessary for responsible research conduct. Through interactive seminars, students will learn about (1) scientists as responsible members of society (contemporary ethical issues in biomedical research and environmental/social impacts of research), (2) policies for research with human subjects and vertebrate animals, (3) collaborative research, (4) conflicts of interest (personal, professional, financial), (5) data acquisition and laboratory tools (management, sharing, ownership), (6) responsible authorship and publication, (7) mentor/trainee responsibilities and relationships, (8) peer review, and (9) research misconduct (forms of misconduct and management policies).

CSBL 5023. Development. 1 Credit Hour.

The course provides a survey of concepts in developmental biology (induction, cell-cell interactions, morphogen gradients, morphogenetic movements, transcription regulation, organogenesis) using experimental examples from both invertebrate and vertebrate embryos. The first set of lectures will focus on gametogenesis, fertilization, and early developmental events, such as cleavage, midblastula transition, gastrulation, and axis formation. The second set of lectures will explore the fates of germ layers in the contexts of cell type-specific differentiation and cell-cell interactions during organogenesis.

CSBL 5024. Genomics. 1 Credit Hour.

This course covers historical aspects of the Genomic project and high throughput methods (microarray, SAGE, proteomics, etc.) to perform global analysis of gene expression; the course also provides an overview of new biological fields such as systems biology, functional genomics, and comparative genomics. The students will have the opportunity to become familiarized with tools, methods, databases, and approaches used to extract biological information from global analyses. Hands-on training on biological databases and classes covering examples of the use of genomics to answer questions related to cancer and diseases is an important part of the course, helping the students to visualize how genomics can be used in their own research projects.

CSBL 5025. Genetics. 1 Credit Hour.

This course is designed to provide an overview of genetic research. Topics to be covered include: cytogenetics, mitochondrial genetics, cancer genetics, linkage analysis, complex traits, population genetics, animal models, sex determination, and epigenetics.

CSBL 6048. Biology of Aging. 4 Credit Hours.

Biology of Aging is the core course of the Biology of Aging Track. The course consists of two modules: Aging and Longevity Mechanisms and Molecular and Cellular Mechanisms of Aging. The purpose of this course is to provide students with the most up-to-date information on the current understanding of the aging process. This advanced interdisciplinary graduate course provides experimental understanding of the interrelated areas of aging and age-related diseases. Faculty from several departments will be involved in teaching this course, which will cover the molecular and cell biology of aging, model systems used for aging studies, age-related changes in organs and tissues, and age-related diseases.