Infection, Inflammation & Immunity

Sample Plan of Study

First Year
FallCredit Hours
IBMS 5000Fundamentals Of Biomedical Sciences 8.0
IBMS 5008Lab Rotations 3.0
TSCI 5070Responsible Conduct Of Patient-Oriented Clinical Research 2.0
 Total Credit Hours: 13.0
First Year
SpringCredit Hours
CSBL 5095Experimental Design And Data Analysis 3.0
IBMS 6090Seminar (Class Section 5III) 1.5
IBMS 6097Research (Class Section 5III) 1.5
MICR 5025Eukaryotic Pathogens 1.0
MICR 5026Bacterial Pathogenesis 1.0
MICR 5028Virology 1.0
MICR 6052Advanced Immunobiology 3.0
 Total Credit Hours: 12.0
Second Year
FallCredit Hours
IBMS 6090Seminar (Class Section 5III) 1.5
IBMS 6097Research (Class Section 5III) 6.5
IBMS 7010Student Journal Club & Research Presentation (Class Section 5III) 1.0
MICR 5029Building Scientific Thinking Skills 2.0
MICR 5090Acquiring Presentation Skills 1.0
Advanced Elective if needed  variable *
 Total Credit Hours: 12.0
Second Year
SpringCredit Hours
IBMS 6090Seminar 1.5
IBMS 6097Research (Class Section 5III) 7.5
IBMS 7001Qualifying Exam (Class Section 5III) 1.0
IBMS 7010Student Journal Club & Research Presentation (Class Section 5III) 1.0
MICR 5090Acquiring Presentation Skills 1.0
Advanced Elective if needed  variable *
 Total Credit Hours: 12.0
Third Year
FallCredit Hours
IBMS 6090Seminar (Class Section 5III) 1.5
IBMS 6097Research (Class Section 5III) 8.5
IBMS 7010Student Journal Club & Research Presentation (Class Section 5III) 1.0
MICR 5090Acquiring Presentation Skills 1.0
Advanced Elective if needed  variable *
 Total Credit Hours: 12.0
Third Year
SpringCredit Hours
IBMS 6090Seminar (Class Section 5III) 1.5
IBMS 6097Research (Class Section 5III) 8.5
IBMS 7010Student Journal Club & Research Presentation (Class Section 5III) 1.0
MICR 5090Acquiring Presentation Skills 1.0
Advanced Elective if needed  variable *
 Total Credit Hours: 12.0
Fourth Year
FallCredit Hours
IBMS 6090Seminar (Class Section 5III) 1.5
IBMS 6097Research (Class Section 5III) 5.5
IBMS 7010Student Journal Club & Research Presentation (Class Section 5III) 1.0
IBMS 7099Dissertation (Class Section 5III) ** 3.0
MICR 5090Acquiring Presentation Skills 1.0
 Total Credit Hours: 12.0
Fourth Year
SpringCredit Hours
IBMS 7010Student Journal Club & Research Presentation (Class Section 5III) 1.0
IBMS 6090Seminar (Class Section 5III) 1.5
IBMS 6097Research (Class Section 5III) 5.5
IBMS 7099Dissertation (Class Section 5III) ** 3.0
MICR 5090Acquiring Presentation Skills 1.0
 Total Credit Hours: 12.0
Fifth Year
FallCredit Hours
IBMS 6090Seminar (Class Section 5III) 1.5
IBMS 6097Research (Class Sections 5III) 5.5
IBMS 7010Student Journal Club & Research Presentation (Class Section 5III) 1.0
IBMS 7099Dissertation (Class Section 5III) ** 3.0
MICR 5090Acquiring Presentation Skills 1.0
 Total Credit Hours: 12.0
Fifth Year
SpringCredit Hours
IBMS 6090Seminar (Class Section 5III) 1.5
IBMS 6097Research (Class Sections 5III) 5.5
IBMS 7010Student Journal Club & Research Presentation (Class Section 5III) 1.0
IBMS 7099Dissertation (Class Section 5III) ** 3.0
MICR 5090Acquiring Presentation Skills 1
 Total Credit Hours: 12.0
*

A minimum of one advanced elective is required. Since different electives vary in credit hours, research credit hours for a given semester should be adjusted in order to maintain a total of 12 credit hours for the semester. A menu of relevant electives from which courses may be selected is shown below. However, students may select, following approval of the student's supervising professor and discipline executive committee, any accredited course offered by any program at UT Health SA.
 

Relevant Electives
 

Primary Suggestions
 

MICR 5035. Emerging Trends in Immunology and Infection (2 SCH)

MICR 5095. Current Topics in Immunobiology and Host-microbe Interactions (1 SCH)
 

Secondary Suggestions
 

BIOC 6010 Gene Expression

BIOC 6036 Macromolecular Structure & Mechanism (2 SCH)

BIOC 6037 Integration of Metabolic Pathways (2 SCH)

CSBL 5007 Methods in Cell Biology, (1 SCH)

CSBL 5024 Genomics (1 SCH) (Spring semester only)

CSBL 5023 Development (1 SCH) (Spring semester only)

CSBL 5025 Genetics (1 SCH) (Spring semester only)

CSBL 5083 Practical Optical Microscopy (1 SCH)

CSBL 6021 Animal Models (3 SCH)

CSBL 6048 Biology of Aging

CSBL 6049 Biology of Aging: Molecular and Cellular Homeostasis (2 SCH) (Spring semester only)

CSBL 6050 Biology of Aging: Systems Homeostasis and Aging (2 SCH) (Spring semester only)

CSBL 6059 Stem Cells and Regenerative Medicine (1 SCH) (Spring semester only)

CSBL 6064 Genetics

CSBL 6068 Cancer Biology Core I (2 SCH) (Fall semester only)

CSBL 6069 Cancer Biology Core II (2 SCH) (Fall semester only)

CSBL 6074 Molecular Aspects of Epigenetics, (2 SCH)

CSBL 6095 Functional Genomic Data Analysis, (2SCH) (Spring semester only)

INTD 6007 Advanced Cell Biology (2 SCH) (Spring semester only)

INTD 6009 Advanced Molecular Biology (2 SCH) (Spring semester only)

INTD 6008 Mitochondria and Apoptosis (1 SCH) (Fall semester only)

INTD 6033 Cellular Signaling Mechanisms

INTD 6043 Structure and Function of Membrane Proteins

**

A minimum of 2 semesters of IBMS 7099-5III (Dissertation) is required for graduation. A student may begin enrolling in IBMS 7099-5III once the Dissertation Research Proposal and the Dissertation Supervising Committee membership are approval by the GSBS Dean. Final hours (3.0 SCH) may be applicable for the final semester.

Courses 

BIOC 6010. Gene Expression. 2 Credit Hours.

The course covers gene expression focusing on regulation at the levels of transcription, RNA processing, transport and stability, and translation. Proteins and other regulatory molecules involved in these processes will also be covered. Particular emphasis will be placed on transcriptional control mechanisms including: RNA polymerases, chromatin remodeling, methylation and other epigenetic modifications, families of transcription factors including their DNA binding properties, protein-protein interaction domains, trans-activation mechanisms, regulation by ligand binding, phosphorylation and other signaling mechanisms and nuclear-cytoplasmic transport; posttranscriptional mechanisms including: mechanisms of RNA splicing, nuclear-cytoplasmic transport of RNA, RNA localization and targeting, RNA stability; and translational control. Post-transcriptional and translational control mechanisms will highlight the roles of RNA binding proteins and their modifications in these processes. Prerequisite: INTD 5000.

BIOC 6036. Macromolecular Structure & Mechanism. 2 Credit Hours.

This course will cover the fundamentals of protein and nucleic acid structure and of enzyme catalysis. The course is required of students in the Molecular Biochemistry and Biophysics Track.Topics to be covered include: DNA and RNA structure, protein structure, protein folding, ligand binding by proteins, and enzyme catalysis. Open for Cross Enrollment on Space Available basis.

BIOC 6037. Integration Of Metabolic Pathways. 2 Credit Hours.

The course is required of students in the Molecular Biophysics and Metabolic Pathways track. The objective is to provide an understanding of the individual reactions in intermediary metabolism and how the reactions are integrated by regulatory mechanisms. Topics include carbohydrate, lipid, and nitrogen metabolism and mechanisms of regulation of individual enzymes and metabolic pathways. Open for Cross Enrollment on Space Available basis.

CSBL 5007. Methods In Cell Biology. 1 Credit Hour.

Through a combination of lectures and demonstrations, the instructors will introduce students to techniques which are currently being used in cellular biology laboratories. The emphasis will be on the applications themselves, their uses, limitations, and the necessary controls. The following topic areas will be covered: imaging and microscopy, immunological techniques, bioinformatics (DNA and protein), rodent anatomy and histology, cytogenetics, and in vitro cell growth and transfection.

CSBL 5023. Development. 1 Credit Hour.

The course provides a survey of concepts in developmental biology (induction, cell-cell interactions, morphogen gradients, morphogenetic movements, transcription regulation, organogenesis) using experimental examples from both invertebrate and vertebrate embryos. The first set of lectures will focus on gametogenesis, fertilization, and early developmental events, such as cleavage, midblastula transition, gastrulation, and axis formation. The second set of lectures will explore the fates of germ layers in the contexts of cell type-specific differentiation and cell-cell interactions during organogenesis.

CSBL 5024. Genomics. 1 Credit Hour.

This course covers historical aspects of the Genomic project and high throughput methods (microarray, SAGE, proteomics, etc.) to perform global analysis of gene expression; the course also provides an overview of new biological fields such as systems biology, functional genomics, and comparative genomics. The students will have the opportunity to become familiarized with tools, methods, databases, and approaches used to extract biological information from global analyses. Hands-on training on biological databases and classes covering examples of the use of genomics to answer questions related to cancer and diseases is an important part of the course, helping the students to visualize how genomics can be used in their own research projects.

CSBL 5025. Genetics. 1 Credit Hour.

This course is designed to provide an overview of genetic research. Topics to be covered include: cytogenetics, mitochondrial genetics, cancer genetics, linkage analysis, complex traits, population genetics, animal models, sex determination, and epigenetics.

CSBL 5083. Practical Optical Microscopy. 1 Credit Hour.

This course will be a one-hour elective for graduate students consisting of eight (8) one-hour lectures plus eight (8) one-hour laboratories. The course focuses on the practical aspects of using optical microscopes. The objectives are to teach students the fundamental principles of optical microscopy and to provide them with hands-on experience using the optical instrumentation in the Institutional Imaging Core.

CSBL 5095. Experimental Design And Data Analysis. 3 Credit Hours.

The purpose of the course is to provide an introduction to experimental design and statistical analysis. The emphasis of the course will be on the selection and application of proper tests of statistical significance. Practical experience will be provided in the use of both parametric and nonparametric methods of statistical evaluation. Among the topics to be covered are: data reduction, types of distributions, hypothesis testing, scales of measurement, chi square analysis, the special case of the comparison of two groups; analysis of variance; a posteriori multiple comparisons tests, tests of the assumptions of parametric analyses, advanced forms of the analysis of variance, linear regression, and correlation analysis. This course involves the use of statistical software; therefore, access to a laptop or a computer with web access for classes and examinations is required.

CSBL 6021. Animal Models. 3 Credit Hours.

The relevant biology, applicability, and practical use of a number of animal models to biomedical research is covered. Invertebrate (e.g., C. elegans) and vertebrate (e.g., fish and rodents) model systems are included in the course. Strengths and weaknesses of each organism that render them particularly valuable as animal models are emphasized. Experimental approaches and tools that are utilized in conjunction with each animal model are rigorously examined. The course is taught from primary scientific literature using classic historical publications and recent publications.

CSBL 6048. Biology of Aging. 4 Credit Hours.

Biology of Aging is the core course of the Biology of Aging Track. The course consists of two modules: Aging and Longevity Mechanisms and Molecular and Cellular Mechanisms of Aging. The purpose of this course is to provide students with the most up-to-date information on the current understanding of the aging process. This advanced interdisciplinary graduate course provides experimental understanding of the interrelated areas of aging and age-related diseases. Faculty from several departments will be involved in teaching this course, which will cover the molecular and cell biology of aging, model systems used for aging studies, age-related changes in organs and tissues, and age-related diseases.

CSBL 6049. Cellular and Molecular Mechanisms of Aging. 2 Credit Hours.

This course provides up-to-date information on the current understanding of cellular and molecular mechanisms that contribute to aging. The focus is on investigation of specific mechanisms of aging including oxidative stress, nutrient sensing signaling pathways, stem cells and senescence, and genome stability. Experimental design and analysis, including pros and cons of approaches used to gain knowledge and how to appropriately interpret data, will be discussed throughout the course. The relationship between age-related changes in function and potential contributions age associated diseases will be examined via recently published research.

CSBL 6050. Aging and Longevity Mechanisms. 2 Credit Hours.

This module will focus on and evaluate several approaches used to modulate longevity and how these are used to discover the genetic, physiological and intracellular foundation of aging processes. The course will consist of interactive lectures complemented by guided reading of currently research papers. Students will be taught to hone critical reading skills and develop testable hypotheses to carry research forward. Topics will include: Genetics of Aging, Exceptional Longevity, Pharmacological Interventions, Calorie Restriction, Healthspan and Pathology of Aging.

CSBL 6059. Stem Cells & Regenerative Medicine. 1 Credit Hour.

The fields of stem cells and regenerative medicine are rapidly evolving and have great potential to change the way medicine is practiced. This course will encompass topics from basics of tissue specific stem cell biology to pre-clinical animal models, strategies and progress in regenerative medicine. We will discuss some of the most current research being done in regenerative medicine from stem cell transplantation to biomaterials. Prerequisite: INTD 5000.

CSBL 6064. Genes & Development. 4 Credit Hours.

Genes and Development is the core course of the Genetics, Genomics, and Development Track. The course consists of four modules: genetics, genomics, developmental biology, and stem cell biology. Basic concepts in genetics such as cytogenetics, mitochondrial genetics, cancer genetics, linkage analysis, complex traits, population genetics, animal models, sex determination, and epigenetics will be presented. The genomics section will include historical aspects of the genome project and high throughput analysis. The students are introduced to new techniques in global analysis as well as have hands-on experience. The developmental biology section provides a survey of concepts in developmental biology (induction, cell-cell interactions, morphogen gradients, morphogenetic movements, transcriptional regulation, organogenesis) using experimental examples from both invertebrate and vertebrate embryos. The stem cell biology section includes the following topics: basic biology of stem cells, including embryonic stem cells, adult stem cells, stem cells in different tissues and model systems; microenvironment-mediated and epigenetic regulators of stem cells; stem cells in medicine, including regenerative medicine, cancer, and aging; and ethics. Required for the Genetics, Genomics & Development Track.

CSBL 6068. Cancer Biology Core 1; An Introductory course. 1 Credit Hour.

This course introduces the key features of cancer biology. In particular this course will provide initial insight into the clinical presentation and the cellular processes involved in cancer biology. In additional will be an initial presentation of molecular oncology. Topics examined include oncogenes, tumor suppressor genes, apoptosis, control of cell cycle regulation, and control of cellular growth and proliferation. Required for Cancer Biology Discipline. Prerequisites: INTD 5007 (or INTD 6007 and INTD 6009).

CSBL 6069. Cancer Biology Core 2; Advanced Cancer Biology. 2.5 Credit Hours.

This course is designed to provide a detailed representation of cancer biology, from progression, standard of care and molecular alterations that drive recent diagnoses and therapeutic strategies. In addition, this course will offer an overview on special populations affected by cancers and models used in the investigation of cancer. Included are basic experimental methods, mouse models, ex vivo systems, molecular profiling and clinical trials. The conceptual notions on clinical trials of cancer drugs and the process of development of novel therapeutic drugs in cancer will be discussed. Required for Cancer Biology Discipline. Prerequisites: INTD 5007 (or INTD 6007 and INTD 6009) and CSBL 6068.

CSBL 6074. Molecular Aspects Of Epigenetics. 2 Credit Hours.

The purpose of this course is to develop an understanding of the molecular aspects of epigenetics. This advanced course will be a unique learning experience that prepares the student to evaluate and design new research in the areas of epigenetic processes including imprinting, gene slicing, X chromosome inactivation, position effect, reprogramming, and the process of tumorigenesis. This module concerns epigenetic mechanisms. Topics include: DNA methylation, histone modifications, epigenetics and stem cells, cancer epigenetics, RNA interference and epigenetics, bioinformatics and epigenetics, and translational epigenetics. This course will include a didactic program and student discussion. For the student discussion module, faculty and students will jointly discuss key publications that serve to bridge the gap between the student's prior understanding of the field and the state of the art in that area.

CSBL 6095. Functional Genomic Data Analysis. 2 Credit Hours.

This course covers basics of genomic data analysis. Focus is on general computational methods, their biomedical basis, and how to evaluate analysis results. Qualitative algorithm descriptions are expected. Prerequisites: CSBL 5095 or Equivalent.

IBMS 5000. Fundamentals Of Biomedical Sciences. 8 Credit Hours.

This core course covers the fundamentals of biochemistry, molecular biology, cell biology, organismal and systems biology, and microbiology and immunology. The course is designed for first-year graduate students matriculating into the Integrated Biomedical Sciences Program (IBMS).

IBMS 5008. Lab Rotations. 1-3 Credit Hours.

This course provides an opportunity for students to participate in research activities in the laboratories of faculty members in different disciplines to learn laboratory skills and to gain an introduction to the research fields of faculty members.

IBMS 6090. Seminar. 1.5 Credit Hour.

This course is required of all students in the IBMS program, except of those who have signed up for Final Hours. Students are required to attend a minimum of 16 seminars per semester and to complete a requirement to demonstrate their attendance and participation. To fulfill the minimum number of seminars, students may include seminars offered by disciplines other than their own in which they are enrolled. However, to enroll, students should obtain permission from the course Section Director affiliated with the appropriate discipline. The course numbers of the individual course sections are IBMS 6090-1GEN, 6090-2BA, 6090-3CB, 6090-4CGM, 6090-5III, 6090-6MBB, 6090-7NS and 6090-8PP for the IBMS Disciplines: Biology of Aging (BA), Cancer Biology (CB), Cell Biology, Genetics & Molecular Medicine (CGM), Infections, Inflammation & Immunity (III), Molecular Biophysics & Biochemistry (MBB), Neuroscience (NS), and Physiology & Pharmacology (PP). Some students who have not declared a discipline, and have obtained the approval of their academic advisor and the Senior Associate Dean of the GSBS, may sign up for IBMS 6090-1GEN. A list of seminars from all disciplines will be posted on the Graduate School website. Each Section Director will determine, for the relevant IBMS-6090 section, the policy for tracking student's attendance and participation in seminars.

IBMS 6097. Research. 0.5-12 Credit Hours.

This course consists of independent, original research under the direction of a faculty advisor. Students should enroll in the research course section that corresponds to the most appropriate IBMS Disciplines: IBMS 6097-2BA for Biology of Aging (BA), IBMS 6097-3CB for Cancer Biology (CB), IBMS 6097-4CGM for Cell Biology, Genetics & Molecular Medicine (CGM), IBMS 6097-5III for Infections, Inflammation & Immunity (III), IBMS 6097-6MBB for Molecular Biophysics & Biochemistry (MBB), IBMS 6097-6NS for Neuroscience (NS), and IBMS 6097-7PP for Physiology & Pharmacology (PP). All students are required to meet with their research supervising committees at least once per semester. Students who have not declared a discipline should sign up for IBMS 6097-1GEN, General section.

IBMS 7001. Qualifying Exam. 1 Credit Hour.

The objective of the Qualifying Examination (QE) is to determine if a student has met programmatic expectations with regard to: i) Acquiring a level of scientific reasoning and a knowledge base in his/her field of study appropriate for a graduate student at the current stage of training; ii) Demonstrating skills of problem-solving and development of experimental strategies designed to test hypotheses associated with a specific scientific problem; and iii) Demonstrating the ability to defend experimental strategies proposed for solving scientific problems. Successful completion of the QE is required for Advancement to Candidacy and continuation in the IBMS Ph.D. program. During the Spring semester of Year 2 (4th semester overall) of the student's program, the QE will be administered by a faculty committee approved by a student's Discipline leadership. Each IBMS discipline will administer the QE process for its students so as to achieve the goals of the discipline while satisfying the expectations of the IBMS graduate program. In general, the QE requires the solving of a relevant unsolved problem in the biomedical sciences by writing a research proposal based on an idea conceived and developed by the student, followed by an oral defense-of-proposal to explore the student's problem-solving process, and the soundness of the student's experimental design. Following the QE, a report will be submitted by the chair of the examination committee to the student's discipline leadership indicating the outcome of the exam and any recommendations that may be required to foster further academic progress by the student. IBMS 7001 is divided into 7 modules overseen by the 7 IBMS Disciplines, each that is responsible for providing its students with a detailed description of the examination process, and for ensuring that the programmatic expectations and goals of the QE are met.

IBMS 7010. Student Journal Club & Research Presentation. 1-2 Credit Hours.

IBMS students should have continuous experience in: 1) discussion and critical analysis of current scientific literature (journal clubs) and, 2) formal presentation of their ongoing research progress to other students and faculty members of their discipline. A discipline-specific course or combination of courses that contains a semester minimum of 0.5 credit hours of scientific literature discussion and 0.5 credit hours of research presentation. This course will be a continuous requirement beginning the Fall semester of the second year until the preceding semester of the dissertation defense. At least once per academic year, students will provide a formal presentation of their research progress to other students and faculty members of their discipline. As well, they will contribute to journal club discussions of current scientific literature. Course will be sub-divided by Disciplines as follows: IBMS 7010-1GEN (General Section) IBMS 7010 -2BA (Biology of Aging) IBMS 7010 -3CB (Cancer Biology) IBMS 7010 -4CGM (Cell Biology, Genetics & Molecular Medicine) IBMS 7010 -5III (Infection, Inflammation & Immunity) IBMS 7010 -6MBB (Molecular Biophysics & Biochemistry) IBMS 7010 -7NS (Neuroscience) IBMS 7010-8PP (Physiology & Pharmacology).

IBMS 7099. Dissertation. 1-12 Credit Hours.

This course is designed to prepare graduate students writing their doctoral dissertation. A candidate for the Ph.D. degree must register for the Dissertation course for at least two terms. Students should enroll in the research course section that corresponds to the most appropriate IBMS discipline: IBMS Disciplines: IBMS 7099-2BA for Biology of Aging (BA), IBMS 7099-3CB for Cancer Biology (CB), IBMS 7099-4CGM for Cell Biology, Genetics & Molecular Medicine (CGM), IBMS 7099-5III for Infections, Inflammation & Immunity (III), 7099-6MBB for Molecular Biophysics & Biochemistry (MBB), IBMS 7099-6NS for Neuroscience (NS), and IBMS 7099-7PP for Physiology & Pharmacology (PP). Prerequisite: Registration is only permitted following a student's admission to candidacy for the Ph.D. degree, approval of the dissertation research proposal and approval of the membership of the candidate's Supervising Committee.

INTD 6007. Advanced Cell Biology. 2 Credit Hours.

This course provides an in-depth learning experience that instructs students on the fundamentals of cell biology as well as prepares the student to evaluate and design new research in the cutting-edge areas of modern cell biology. The course combines a didactic program of lectures along with a small-group discussion format in which students interact closely with a group of faculty who have active research programs. The course focuses on active areas of research in cell biology: Cell Signaling and Communication, Cell Growth, and Cell Death. Each week, the faculty the jointly discuss key publications that serve the bridge the gap between the fundamental underpinnings of the field and the state of the art in that area. Students and faculty will then jointly discuss key publications that serve to bridge the gap between the fundamental underpinnnings of the field and the state of the art in that area.

INTD 6008. Mitochondria & Apoptosis. 1 Credit Hour.

This course will focus in depth on Mitochondria and Apoptosis. Topics will include: Mitochondria and Respiration; Mitochondria and Reactive Oxygen Species; Mitochondria and Apoptosis. It will provide an opportunity for a unique learning experience where the student can prepare to evaluate and design new research in the cutting-edge areas of modern cell biology and molecular biology. Instead of a didactic program of lectures, the entire course comprises a small-group format in which students interact closely with a group of faculty who have active research programs. Each week, faculty will provide students with a brief overview of the research area. Students and faculty will then jointly discuss key publications that serve to bridge the gap between the student's prior understanding of the field and the state of the art in that area.

INTD 6009. Advanced Molecular Biology. 2 Credit Hours.

This course will provide an in-depth learning experience on the fundamentals of molecular biology as well as prepare the student to evaluate and design new research in the cutting-edge areas of modern molecular biology. The course combines a didactic program of lectures along with a small- group discussion format in which students interact closely with a group of faculty who have active research programs. The course focuses on active areas of research in molecular biology: Chromatin structure, Transcription, DNA Replication and Repair, Recombination, RNA processing and regulation, Protein processing, targeting and degradation. Each week, the faculty provide students with didactic lectures on a current research area. Students and faculty then jointly discuss Key publications that serve to bridge the gap between the fundamental underpinnings of the field and the state of the art in that area.

INTD 6033. Cell Signaling Mechanisms. 2 Credit Hours.

This course covers the molecular mechanisms of action of various extracellular mediators including hormones, neurotransmitters, growth factors, cytokines, etc., and cell signaling events. Several areas will be discussed including: (1) mechanisms of mediator synthesis; (2) interaction of mediators with specific receptors; (3) modulation by mediators of various second messenger systems including cyclic nucleotides, inositol phospholipids, calcium, protein phosphorylation, ion flux, etc.; and (4) intra- and intercellular mechanism for regulating mediator action. Open for Cross Enrollment on Space Available basis.

INTD 6043. Structure & Function Of Membrane Proteins. 2 Credit Hours.

This is a course targeted at students within any of the Graduate Tracks. The objective is to provide a broad view, allowing for in depth consideration in selected areas, of the structure and diverse functions of proteins within a membrane environment. Specific topics covered will include: ion selective channels, large membrane pores, membrane transporters, membrane pumps, and membrane receptors. The format of the course will be didactic lecture followed by student presentations of relevant topics. Open for Cross Enrollment on Space Available basis.

MICR 5025. Eukaryotic Pathogens. 1 Credit Hour.

The course will provide students with the opportunity to gain a basic comprehensive understanding of parasitology and mycology. The first part of this course will focus on virulence mechanisms and the host immune response with respect to a variety of parasites that cause major human diseases. The second part of this course will cover several important areas of medical mycology including molecular biology, diagnostic/epidemiology, mating/phenotypic switching, morphology, pathogenesis, and antifungal therapies.

MICR 5026. Bacterial Pathogenesis. 1 Credit Hour.

This is an introductory course in microbial pathogenesis focusing on bacterial pathogens that are important in human disease. Students will receive a foundation in the basic concepts and experimental approaches that are crucial for understanding the discipline through directed readings and didactic instruction. Specific concepts, strategies, and mechanisms used by human bacterial pathogens to cause disease will be illustrated.

MICR 5028. Virology. 1 Credit Hour.

This course focuses on the molecular and cellular biology of animal viruses, and their interactions with host cells. Many of the viruses to be covered in this course are medically significant or have provided critical information that has expanded our understanding of cell biology, immunology, development, and differentiation.

MICR 5029. Building Scientific Thinking Skills. 2 Credit Hours.

The goal of this course is to provide the opportunity for graduate students to develop critical thinking skills in reading scientific literature, developing/critiquing scientific ideas and grant proposals and effectively communicating one's own scientific ideas with peers. The courses will be offered in three consecutive stages. First, each student will be assigned/encouraged to read articles focusing on a topic in the areas of Microbiology and Immunology and give a 50 minute review presentation on the topic to the class followed by questions/critiques from fellow students and faculty members. Second, each student is guided to develop a mini-proposal on a chosen topic followed by written critiques from fellow students and faculty members. Finally, each student is arranged to give an oral defense of his or her written proposal to the class followed by questions from fellow students and faculty members. Since the proposal writing and defense portions mimic the process involved in M&I track qualification examination, this course will not only have a long lasting impact on the students' scientific skill development, but also help prepare the students for the immediate qualification examination.

MICR 5035. Emerging Trends in Immunology and Infection. 2 Credit Hours.

An intense and advanced exploration of the primary literature focusing on the latest emerging trends in immunological research. The format will allow students to develop skills of in depth critical analysis and will involve a combination of student presentations of current data and discussions of the historical development and evolution of new directions in immunological research.

MICR 5090. Acquiring Presentation Skills. 1 Credit Hour.

This course is designed to prepare the student for giving a scientific lecture or seminar. Students present at least one lecture per academic year. Each student is coached and evaluated by faculty members in terms of both effective public speaking and critically analyzing scientific data. In addition, the seminars are videotaped. Students are required to attend all seminars.

MICR 5095. Current Topics in Immunobiology and Host-microbe Interactions. 1 Credit Hour.

This course is designed to enhance and expand on the existing Acquiring Presentation Skills (APS) course (MICR 5090) that is required of all graduate students in the Infection, Inflammation, & Immunity discipline of the IBMS Graduate Program, and the Ph.D. students of the Microbiology & Immunology Graduate Program. Although the APS course allows students to gain experience with regard to making formal lecture presentations of their research, it is limited in that students present their work only once a year, the opportunity for full discussion is limited by the time available after presentations, and being a course in which participants are exclusively students, there are no opportunities to observe examples of how skilled seasoned investigators (i.e., faculty and postdoctoral fellows) present their work. In the currently proposed course, graduate students will not only have more frequent opportunities to present their own research and receive vital feedback and critiques, but will also hear and critique presentations by more senior investigators regarding projects performed in labs throughout the Department of Microbiology & Immunology.

MICR 6052. Advanced Immunobiology. 3 Credit Hours.

This course consists of lectures only. This course is an in-depth study of the immune system and how it is regulated, including presentation and discussion of current literature in these areas. Prerequisites: MICR 5051 or consent of instructor.

TSCI 5070. Responsible Conduct Of Patient-Oriented Clinical Research. 2 Credit Hours.

This interdisciplinary course is designed to train participants in the responsible conduct of patient-oriented clinical research. Students will have the opportunity to learn to and, by the end of the course, be required to: (1) delineate a history of hallmark abuses of humans enrolled in clinical research; (2) describe the evolution of national and international codes and regulations guiding inclusion of human subjects in clinical investigations; (3) list the elements of informed consent and describe procedures and precautions for enrolling special populations into clinical investigation; (4) write a consent form in understandable language; (5) recognize different forms of scientific misconduct; (6) describe the role and processes of a peer review board to judge violations in research ethics; (7) develop strategies for self-assessment and validation of scientific objectivity in one's own research; and (8) recognize the ethical responsibilities and consequences of whistle blowing.