Master of Science (M.S.)

The master’s degree is offered only under special circumstances and upon recommendation by the program COGS and approval by the Graduate Dean.

Pharmacology Degree Requirements

A minimum of 30 credit hours and a minimum overall GPA of 3.0 is required for the M.S. degree. In addition, all master’s candidates must register for IBMS 6098 Thesis for at least one semester in order to graduate. The student must successfully defend a thesis and be recommended by their program COGS for approval of their degree to the Dean of the Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences.

Pharmacology Sample Plans of Study

M.S. in Neuroscience1

First Year
FallCredit Hours
IBMS 5000Fundamentals Of Biomedical Sciences 8
IBMS 5008Lab Rotations 2
 Total Credit Hours: 10.0
First Year
SpringCredit Hours
INTD 5040 or PHYL 5041Fundamentals Of Neuroscience1: Molecular, Cellular, & Developmental Neuroscience 1-2
IBMS 5008Lab Rotations 2
Second Track course elective (Principles of Pharmacology, Cell Signaling, Aging, Genetics, etc.)  3
IBMS 6090Seminar 1.5
TSCI 5070Responsible Conduct Of Patient-Oriented Clinical Research 2
 Total Credit Hours: 9.5-10.5
Second Year
FallCredit Hours
PHAR 5020Basics Of Research Design 2
PHAR 5092Special Problems In Pharmacology: Research Practicum 1-9
INTD 5043Fundamentals Of Neuroscience 2: Systems Neuroscience 3
INTD 5047Neuroanatomy 2
CSBL 5095Experimental Design And Data Analysis 3
IBMS 6090Seminar 1.5
IBMS 6097Research 0.5-12
 Total Credit Hours: 13.0-32.5
Second Year
SpringCredit Hours
Electives- see department  5
IBMS 6097Research 0.5-12
IBMS 6090Seminar 1.5
 Total Credit Hours: 7.0-18.5
Third Year
FallCredit Hours
IBMS 6090Seminar 1.5
IBMS 6098Thesis 1-9
 Total Credit Hours: 2.5-10.5
Third Year
SpringCredit Hours
IBMS 6090Seminar 1.5
IBMS 6098Thesis 1-9
 Total Credit Hours: 2.5-10.5
Fourth Year
FallCredit Hours
IBMS 6098Thesis 1-9
IBMS 6090Seminar 1.5
 Total Credit Hours: 2.5-10.5
Fourth Year
SpringCredit Hours
IBMS 6098Thesis 1-9
IBMS 6090Seminar 1.5
 Total Credit Hours: 2.5-10.5
Fifth Year
FallCredit Hours
IBMS 6098Thesis 1-9
IBMS 6090Seminar 1.5
 Total Credit Hours: 2.5-10.5
Fifth Year
SpringCredit Hours
IBMS 6098Thesis 1-9
IBMS 6090Seminar 1.5
 Total Credit Hours: 2.5-10.5
1

A minimum of 30 semester hours is required to grant a MS degree, and further requirements are outlined in the Neuroscience handbook.

MS in Pharmacology

First Year
FallCredit Hours
IBMS 5000Fundamentals Of Biomedical Sciences 8
IBMS 5008Lab Rotations 2
 Total Credit Hours: 10.0
First Year
SpringCredit Hours
PHAR 5014Integrative Physiology & Therapeutics 4.5
PHAR 5013Principles Of Pharmacology & Physiology 1 3
IBMS 5008Lab Rotations 2
IBMS 6090Seminar 1.5
 Total Credit Hours: 11.0
Second Year
FallCredit Hours
PHAR 5020Basics Of Research Design 2
PHAR 5092Special Problems In Pharmacology: Research Practicum 1-9
CSBL 5095Experimental Design And Data Analysis 3
IBMS 6090Seminar 1.5
IBMS 6097Research 0.5-12
PHAR Electives 1 
 Total Credit Hours: 8.0-27.5
Second Year
SpringCredit Hours
TSCI 5070Responsible Conduct Of Patient-Oriented Clinical Research 2
IBMS 6090Seminar 1.5
IBMS 6097Research 0.5-12
PHAR Electives 1 
Qualifying Exam  
 Total Credit Hours: 4.0-15.5
Third Year
FallCredit Hours
IBMS 6098Thesis 1-9
IBMS 6090Seminar 1.5
 Total Credit Hours: 2.5-10.5
Third Year
SpringCredit Hours
IBMS 6098Thesis 1-9
IBMS 6090Seminar 1.5
 Total Credit Hours: 2.5-10.5
Fourth Year
FallCredit Hours
IBMS 6098Thesis 1-9
IBMS 6090Seminar 1.5
 Total Credit Hours: 2.5-10.5
Fourth Year
SpringCredit Hours
IBMS 6098Thesis 1-9
IBMS 6090Seminar 1.5
 Total Credit Hours: 2.5-10.5
Fifth Year
FallCredit Hours
IBMS 6098Thesis 1-9
IBMS 6090Seminar 1.5
 Total Credit Hours: 2.5-10.5
Fifth Year
SpringCredit Hours
IBMS 6098Thesis 1-9
IBMS 6090Seminar 1.5
 Total Credit Hours: 2.5-10.5
1

A minimum of 30 semester hours is required to grant an MS degree, and further requirements are outlined in the Pharmacology handbook.

Pharmacology Objectives/Program Outcomes

  • The student will be able to conduct independent research.
  • The student will demonstrate proficiency in core coursework.
  • The student will be able to critically evaluate current scientific literature.
  • The student will be able to communicate effectively in writing.
  • The student will be able to communicate effectively in an oral format.

CSBL 5095. Experimental Design And Data Analysis. 3 Credit Hours.

The purpose of the course is to provide an introduction to experimental design and statistical analysis. The emphasis of the course will be on the selection and application of proper tests of statistical significance. Practical experience will be provided in the use of both parametric and nonparametric methods of statistical evaluation. Among the topics to be covered are: data reduction, types of distributions, hypothesis testing, scales of measurement, chi square analysis, the special case of the comparison of two groups; analysis of variance; a posteriori multiple comparisons tests, tests of the assumptions of parametric analyses, advanced forms of the analysis of variance, linear regression, and correlation analysis. This course involves the use of statistical software; therefore, access to a laptop or a computer with web access for classes and examinations is required.

IBMS 5000. Fundamentals Of Biomedical Sciences. 8 Credit Hours.

This core course covers the fundamentals of biochemistry, molecular biology, cell biology, organismal and systems biology, and microbiology and immunology. The course is designed for first-year graduate students matriculating into the Integrated Biomedical Sciences Program (IBMS).

IBMS 5008. Lab Rotations. 1-3 Credit Hours.

This course provides an opportunity for students to participate in research activities in the laboratories of faculty members in different disciplines to learn laboratory skills and to gain an introduction to the research fields of faculty members.

IBMS 6090. Seminar. 1.5 Credit Hour.

This course is required of all students in the IBMS program, except of those who have signed up for Final Hours. Students are required to attend a minimum of 16 seminars per semester and to complete a requirement to demonstrate their attendance and participation. To fulfill the minimum number of seminars, students may include seminars offered by disciplines other than their own in which they are enrolled. However, to enroll, students should obtain permission from the course Section Director affiliated with the appropriate discipline. The course numbers of the individual course sections are IBMS 6090-1GEN, 6090-2BA, 6090-3CB, 6090-4CGM, 6090-5III, 6090-6MBB, 6090-7NS and 6090-8PP for the IBMS Disciplines: Biology of Aging (BA), Cancer Biology (CB), Cell Biology, Genetics & Molecular Medicine (CGM), Infections, Inflammation & Immunity (III), Molecular Biophysics & Biochemistry (MBB), Neuroscience (NS), and Physiology & Pharmacology (PP). Some students who have not declared a discipline, and have obtained the approval of their academic advisor and the Senior Associate Dean of the GSBS, may sign up for IBMS 6090-1GEN. A list of seminars from all disciplines will be posted on the Graduate School website. Each Section Director will determine, for the relevant IBMS-6090 section, the policy for tracking student's attendance and participation in seminars.

IBMS 6097. Research. 0.5-12 Credit Hours.

This course consists of independent, original research under the direction of a faculty advisor. Students should enroll in the research course section that corresponds to the most appropriate IBMS Disciplines: IBMS 6097-2BA for Biology of Aging (BA), IBMS 6097-3CB for Cancer Biology (CB), IBMS 6097-4CGM for Cell Biology, Genetics & Molecular Medicine (CGM), IBMS 6097-5III for Infections, Inflammation & Immunity (III), IBMS 6097-6MBB for Molecular Biophysics & Biochemistry (MBB), IBMS 6097-6NS for Neuroscience (NS), and IBMS 6097-7PP for Physiology & Pharmacology (PP). All students are required to meet with their research supervising committees at least once per semester. Students who have not declared a discipline should sign up for IBMS 6097-1GEN, General section.

IBMS 6098. Thesis. 1-9 Credit Hours.

Registration for at least one term is required for M.S. candidates. Prerequisite: Admission to candidacy for the Master of Science degree is required.

INTD 5043. Fundamentals Of Neuroscience 2: Systems Neuroscience. 3 Credit Hours.

This course, the second component of our broad survey of the basics of neuroscience, begins at the level of the neural circuit, and guides the students through an understanding of increasingly complex levels of organization and function in the brain. Topics include neurotransmitter systems, sensory and motor function, motivated behavior, regulation and integration of autonomic, behavioral, and emotional responses in the limbic system, higher order cognitive processes, and the neurobiological basis underlying some important psychiatric disorders and their treatment.

INTD 5047. Neuroanatomy. 2 Credit Hours.

The purpose of this course is to provide students with a practical working knowledge of the structure of both the peripheral and central nervous system. The emphasis will be on the organization of the human brain, although the brains of other species may also be included if appropriate for a specific brain region. The course will look at each of the individual components of the central nervous system in some depth but will also emphasize the complex integration of these various components into a functional brain. The topics covered in the course are specifically designed to mesh in time with those covered in Fundamentals of Neuroscience 2 describing the function of these areas. For this reason, it would be best if these two courses were taken concomitantly. The course will be didactic with digital images, models, and wet specimens included in the course.

INTD 6002. Ethics In Research. 0.5 Credit Hours.

This course covers topics relevant to ethics in scientific research. The course is taught on a case-study basis, dealing with real and hypothetical situations relevant to the conduct of scientific research. Topics discussed will include, but will not be limited to: data management, peer review, recognizing scientific misconduct, authorship, and The University of Texas regulations relevant to human and animal research. This course is required of all doctoral graduate students.

INTD 6097. Research. 0.5-12 Credit Hours.

This course is intended for first-year IMGP students only. Students will be required to attend a minimum of 10 departmental (any) seminars during the semester and submit a 100-150 word synopsis of each seminar within two weeks of the seminar.

PHAR 5013. Principles Of Pharmacology & Physiology 1. 3 Credit Hours.

Topics include principles of drug action; receptor classification and quantitation; dose response relationships; cellular mechanisms of drug action; fundamental concepts of drug receptor interactions; voltage gated and ion channels; drug actions mediate by transduction and non-transduction enzymes; time course of drug action; absorption, distribution, biotransformation and elimination of drugs; pharmacokinetics; and experimental approaches to drug action.

PHAR 5014. Integrative Physiology & Therapeutics. 4.5 Credit Hours.

This course provides students with a base of knowledge in physiology and pharmacology taking an integrative approach to understanding experimental and clinical therapeutics. Primary focus will be on understanding normal physiologic functions, cellular mechanism underlying disease, and systematic consideration of the pharmacology, clinical applications, and toxicities of the major classes of drugs. This required 4.5 credit hour course for Pharmacology and Physiology students is comprised of three sections, each covering major areas of physiology and pharmacology along with their corresponding therapeutics. The three sections include: 1) autonomic nervous system control and therapeutics, 2) cardiovascular, renal and respiratory physiology and therapeutics, and 3) metabolism, hormones, GI physiology and therapeutics. Each section is to be offered separately as an independent micro-elective for students from other programs within the Graduate School of Biomedical Science. Prerequisites: IBMS 5000 and PHAR 5013.

PHAR 5020. Basics Of Research Design. 2 Credit Hours.

This course aims at teaching first-year graduate students fundamentals of research design and analysis of scientific literature to orient them with setting up scientific experiments and writing grant proposals. The course is divided into three sections: research design, communicating scientific data, and getting scientific ideas funded.

PHAR 5092. Special Problems In Pharmacology: Research Practicum. 1-9 Credit Hours.

This is a full-semester research experience for the principal investigator to evaluate if a student demonstrates the potential for productive and independent investigation during the summer following the first year. The course concludes with a 15 minute oral presentation given by the student and a written report in a journal style.

PHYL 5041. Excitable Membranes. 1 Credit Hour.

This course addresses fundamental mechanisms of cell excitability in neurons and other excitable tissues. The format is a combination of lectures, readings, discussions, a laboratory demonstration, and online simulations (where available). Examples of the latter include activities to simulate the resting membrane potential and action potentials. The module will emphasize contemporary issues in the scientific literature as well as translational science where dysfunction in ion channels underlie common disorders such as Alzheimer's Disease, Myasthenia Gravis, Cystic Fibrosis, Long QT Syndrome, and Epilepsy to name just a few. PHYL 5041 is a co-requisite for Fundamentals of Neuroscience I as it is the first module of that course, but it also can be taken as a standalone one-hour course.

TSCI 5070. Responsible Conduct Of Patient-Oriented Clinical Research. 2 Credit Hours.

This interdisciplinary course is designed to train participants in the responsible conduct of patient-oriented clinical research. Students will have the opportunity to learn to and, by the end of the course, be required to: (1) delineate a history of hallmark abuses of humans enrolled in clinical research; (2) describe the evolution of national and international codes and regulations guiding inclusion of human subjects in clinical investigations; (3) list the elements of informed consent and describe procedures and precautions for enrolling special populations into clinical investigation; (4) write a consent form in understandable language; (5) recognize different forms of scientific misconduct; (6) describe the role and processes of a peer review board to judge violations in research ethics; (7) develop strategies for self-assessment and validation of scientific objectivity in one's own research; and (8) recognize the ethical responsibilities and consequences of whistle blowing.