Dual Degree M.D./M.P.H. Program

The M.D./M.P.H. Program prepares physicians to treat individuals and populations through training in medicine, biostatistics, epidemiology, behavioral science, public policy, environmental science, and global health. This program allows students to attain an M.D. and a Master in Public Health (M.P.H.) concurrently by taking classes with the University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston School of Public Health in San Antonio. Classes can be taken online, in person, or through an interactive video link (iTV) to other UTHealth School of Public Health campuses. Students must be accepted into the Long School of Medicine, and then apply and be accepted into the UTHealth School of Public Health in San Antonio. The M.P.H. requires completion of 45 credit hours, 12 of which are shared credit hours for completion of the Long School of Medicine M.D. curriculum. The program allows for both M.D. and M.P.H. degrees to be completed in either 4 or 5 years.

For more information about the program or to be put in contact with program coordinators or faculty at either school, please email MDMPH@uthscsa.edu

Admissions Requirements

Candidates must first be accepted to the Long School of  Medicine and then apply to the School of Public Health at the University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston.

If accepted into the dual degree program, students will begin coursework for the M.P.H. with online courses in the summer before starting medical school.

Degree Requirements

This program allows for students to accomplish the M.D. and the M.P.H. in four years; however, students may decide to take five years to complete both degrees. Students will begin coursework for the M.P.H. with online courses in the summer before starting medical school. The M.P.H. requires completion of 45 credit hours, some of which will be shared with the Long School of Medicine credit hours.

Program Policies

The M.D./M.P.H. Program prepares physicians to treat individuals and populations via training in biostatistics, epidemiology, behavioral science, public policy, and environmental health. This program allows for students to attain the M.D. and the M.P.H. concurrently; however, students may decide to take five years to complete both degrees. Candidates must first be accepted to the Long School of Medicine and then apply to the School of Public Health at the University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston (UTSPH). If accepted into the dual degree program, students will begin coursework for the M.P.H. with online courses in the summer before starting medical school. The M.P.H. requires completion of 45 credit hours, some of which will be shared with the Long School of Medicine credit hours.  To be a dual degree student and earn shared credits, you must begin your M.P.H. coursework by the Spring of your second year of medical school.

The UTSPH has a regional campus in San Antonio with full-time faculty. The campus is located less than one mile from the Long School of Medicine, with convenient parking. Classes are offered online and in person with instructors from San Antonio and via ITV with instructors from other SPH campuses. See the San Antonio campus website at: https://sph.uth.edu/campuses/san-antonio/

The M.D./M.P.H. Program expects students who are pursuing the dual degree to maintain standards of academic excellence, to progress in a timely fashion toward both the M.D. and M.P.H. degrees, and to maintain professionalism. Students will be subject to the academic guidelines of both the Long School of Medicine and the UTSPH. Failure to meet or achieve the established standards will result in denial of advancement and dismissal from the M.D./ M.P.H. Program. A student's academic standing and ability to progress with respect to either the Long School of Medicine or the UTSPH is administered through the appropriate dean's office or their designees. M.D./ M.P.H. students shall have the right to appeal a decision of dismissal from the program. The appeal will be heard by the M.D./ M.P.H. Program Advisory Committee. Solely on procedural concerns can a student appeal to a higher institutional administration.