Doctor of Medicine (M.D.)

Brief History

In April 1959 Texas Governor Price Daniel signed House Bill 9 to establish the South Texas Medical School, the first component of the institution that would soon become the Health Science Center. In July 1968 the medical school, now known as The University of Texas School of Medicine at San Antonio (SOM), and the Bexar County Teaching Hospital, now known as University Hospital, were dedicated. Thirty-three medical students graduated with the Doctor of Medicine degree in the first medical school commencement in June 1970. In 1998 the Texas State Legislature authorized the creation the Regional Academic Health Center (RAHC) in the Lower Rio Grande Valley, which was administered by the SOM, and in June 2002 the RAHC opened its doors to train medical students and residents. Today there are nearly 900 medical students receiving their education at the SOM.

Accreditation

The SOM is fully accredited by the Liaison Committee on Medical Education (LCME), the nationally recognized body for the accreditation of medical education programs leading to the Doctor of Medicine degree in the United States.

Doctor of Medicine (M.D.) Admissions Requirements

Information about specific admission requirements is detailed online under Admissions at the The University of Texas School of Medicine at San Antonio (SOM) website. Applicants must have at least 90 semester hour credits from a United States or Canadian college or university with no grade lower than a C in required course work (see http://som.uthscsa.edu/Admissions/prerequisites.asp). Applicants must take the Medical College Admission Test (MCAT) no later than the first week of September the year preceding anticipated matriculation. Web-based applications are available through the Texas Medical and Dental Schools Application Service (TMDSAS) in Austin. MCAT scores should be forwarded no later than October 15 of the year preceding matriculation. All MCAT scores must be reported to the TMDSAS through the AAMC. MCAT scores are not automatically forwarded to TMDSAS. Applicants must release their MCAT scores to TMDSAS as soon as they are known to the applicant. Scores from later administrations of the MCAT may be considered for purposes of selecting students from the alternate pool.

Acceptance Requirements

The Admissions Committee evaluates each candidate’s application to make an assessment of the individual’s academic background, performance on the MCAT, the recommendation of the premedical advisor, and the nonacademic achievements. Preparation for medical school as reflected in clinical experiences and demonstration of integrity, maturity, motivation, judgment, and resourcefulness are also evaluated. Further evaluation of the most promising candidates is made by means of personal interviews, invitations for which are issued by the Admissions Committee. Only applicants who are permanent U.S. residents or American citizens will be considered for interview and acceptance. The same criteria for evaluation are applied to all candidates. Applicants are encouraged to read the Factors Considered for Applicant Interview and Acceptance at http://SOM.uthscsa.edu/admissions/index.asp. All candidates must meet the required technical standards. The SOM is committed to nondiscrimination policies for all populations including qualified individuals with disabilities or (see Essential Abilities for Completion of the Medical Curriculum or http://SOM.uthscsa.edu/Admissions/essentialabilities.asp). The SOM may offer early acceptances during the TMDSAS pre-match period from October through December.  Other candidates may be accepted through the TMDSAS Match process, results of which are available on TMDSAS on February 1. Candidates whose applications are rejected by the Admissions Committee with or without personal interviews shall be notified as soon as possible after the committee’s action. An applicant receiving an acceptance of admission will be requested to file a letter of intent to enroll within two weeks of receipt of acceptance. The acceptance is contingent upon clearance through a criminal background check (see Student Background Check Policy) and satisfying all coursework prerequisites and meeting all other requirements involved in the matriculation process.

Because some of the medical schools in Texas begin their academic year earlier than September, all LCME-accredited medical schools in Texas have agreed not to offer acceptances to candidates already enrolled at another Texas medical school in the state after July 1.

Facilitated Acceptance to Medical Education (FAME) Program

As a result of the UT System Transformation in Medical Education (TIME) initiative, the UT at San Antonio (UTSA) and SOM, have partnered to create the Facilitated Acceptance to Medical Education (FAME) Program. The FAME Program is an educationally innovative dual degree (B.S./M.D.) program designed to train and graduate primary care physicians. To meet degree requirements set for all college graduates in Texas, core courses have been interwoven into a collaborative seven-year curriculum. This shared project uses traditional lectures, small group sessions, team taught courses, and innovative seminars structured on disease-related experiences. The FAME Program recruits and admits highly qualified students. These students benefit from an accelerated degree program, an innovative curriculum, early immersion into medical education and professional identity formation, and a decreased overall student debt. The FAME Program will play a positive role in helping address the healthcare needs of Texas.

To apply for the FAME Program, student will apply to UTSA online at applytexas.org and complete the UTSA and FAME application process. Applications for the FAME Program will be accepted August 15 – December 1, and invited interviews will be held in January and February of each academic year.

Once accepted in the FAME program the student must:

  • Maintain an overall GPA and science GPA of ≥ 3.6 to be eligible to matriculate to the SOM
  • Complete a minimum of 15 hours per semester at UTSA
  • Complete a minimum of 90 hours at UTSA within 3 years
  • Meet with his/her FAME Program coordinator every semester for academic and career advising
  • Take the MCAT by the end of January of the junior year at UTSA
  • Achieve on the MCAT a minimum overall score of 504 with a minimum score of 126 in each category; if the student fails to meet this bar, medical school matriculation will be delayed and medical school conditional acceptance will be continued for an additional application cycle, pending achievement of required MCAT scores
  • Demonstrate satisfactory performance on all UT System TIME initiative competencies in the areas of:
    • Communication Skills and Collaboration
    • Professionalism
    • Medical Knowledge and Scholarship
    • Patient Care
    • Practice-based Learning and Improvement
    • Systems-based Practice and Management

Students who fulfill all program requirements will be guaranteed admission to the SOM. Upon successful completion of the first year of the SOM curriculum with minimum course grades of “C,” a Bachelor of Science in Biology from UTSA will be awarded. Upon successful completion of SOM curriculum, an M.D. degree will be awarded.

Dual Degree Programs

Dual degree programs of study provide a mechanism for a medical student to obtain a Master in Public Health (M.P.H) or a Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.) degree in addition to an medical degree from the School of Medicine. The purpose of these programs is to offer students the opportunity to become trained as clinical scientists who have not only depth of knowledge in clinical medicine but also experience in research planning and execution.

M.D./Ph.D. Program

The goals of the M.D./Ph.D. Program are: 

  • to prepare physician-scientists to become accomplished health care providers and investigators with problem-solving knowledge and skills
  • to train physician-scientists in the conduct of clinical and translational research in culturally diverse settings
  • to develop future leaders in academic health care and biomedical research

To apply for the M.D./Ph.D. program, applicants must use the American Medical College Application Service (AMCAS) website. Applicants who seek the M.D. program at SOM must use the TMDSAS application system. The deadlines for these applications vary.

The M.D./Ph.D. Program is seven to eight years in length. Students usually begin with two years of the preclinical curriculum in the SOM. After successful completion of the USMLE Step 1, they enter a three to four year Ph.D. program in the Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, after which they return to the SOM for two years of clinical rotations. With the guidance and approval of the M.D./Ph.D. dean and M.D./Ph.D. Program Advisory Committee, students select laboratory rotations, graduate program affiliation in one of many tracks, and Supervising Professors from the graduate school faculty throughout the institution. Enrichment activities include a monthly “Bench-to-Bedside” course, and a six-week clinical refresher course to provide smooth transition from graduate school into the remaining clinical years. Opportunities exist for student research during the fourth year of medical school. With completion of this program, M.D./Ph.D. graduates are prepared for careers as dual-degree physician-scientists.

M.D./M.P.H. Program

The M.D./M.P.H. Program prepares physicians to treat individuals and populations via training in biostatistics, epidemiology, behavioral science, public policy, and environmental health. This program allows for students to accomplish the M.D. and the M.P.H. in four years; however, students may decide to take five years to complete both degrees. Candidates must first be accepted to the SOM and then apply to the School of Public Health at the UT Health Science Center-Houston. If accepted into the dual degree program, students will begin coursework for the M.P.H. with online courses in the summer before starting medical school. The M.P.H. requires completion of 46 credit hours, some of which will be shared with the SOM credit hours.

M.D./Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery (OMS) Certificate Program

The Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery (OMS) certificate program is a six year course of study, leading sequentially to an M.D. degree and then an OMS Certificate. All of the training occurs on the campus of the Health Science Center or on rotations with clinical partners affiliated with the Health Science Center. There are currently no off-site rotations.  Applications to the OMS Certificate Program are submitted through the American Dental Education Association Postdoctoral Application Support Service (ADEA PASS) and acceptances are offered through the Postdoctoral Dental Matching Program at National Matching Services, Inc. The applicants must have a dental degree granted by a Commission on Dental Accreditation (CODA)-recognized school in the United States or Canada, must be a U.S. citizen or legal resident, and must demonstrate outstanding academic ability, maturity, judgment and ambition. The applications are reviewed, and applicants are selected, by the Program’s Admissions Committee, which consists of faculty members of the Department of OMS.  The SOM has agreed to admit those applicants recommended by the Program’s Admissions Committee, with a maximum of 3 students per entering class. Students in the OMS Certificate Program are given advanced standing in the medical school because much of their foundational curriculum was completed during dental school. The SOM will allow for a maximum bulk transfer of 44 credit hours for the successful completion of foundational coursework in a CODA-recognized D.D.S. or D.M.D. program. (The foundational coursework can include Biochemistry, Embryology, Introduction to Professional Ethics, Introduction to History Taking and Physical Exam Skills, Foundations of Professional Development, Gross Anatomy, Histology, Microbiology, Pharmacology, and Physiology).

Doctor of Medicine (M.D.) Curriculum

The acronym CIRCLE (Curricular Integration, Researchers, Clinicians, Leaders, Educators) represents the integrated four-year medical school education program which is described briefly below.

Preclinical Curriculum

The foundational 19 month curriculum is taught in ten learning modules and three longitudinal modules. Within each module there is progression of knowledge in a systematic fashion as follows: normal structure and function, pathogenesis and pathophysiology of the condition or disorder, clinical manifestations of the condition or disorder, pharamacotherapeutic interventions for the condition or disorder, clinical and translational research and evidence-based medicine approach for the condition or disorder, epidemiology or prevention of the condition or disorder, and interpretation of diagnostic tests. Each module has a weekly thematic content which is synthesized via a small group interactive patient case.

Learning Modules:

1.     Molecules to Medicine

2.     Attack and Defense

3.     Hematology

4.     Respiratory Health

5.     Circulation

6.     Renal & Male Reproductive

7.     Mind, Brain, and Behavior

8.     Endocrine/Female Reproductive

9.     Digestive Health and Nutrition

10. Form and Function:  Skin, Bone, and Muscle

Longitudinal Modules:

1.     Medicine, Behavior, and Society

2.     Clinical Skills

3.     Language of Medicine


Clinical Curriculum

Following successful completion of the entire preclinical curriculum students enter the clinical curriculum.  This is comprised of 48 weeks of clerkships, 20 weeks of electives, 8 weeks of selectives, and 4 weeks of didactics.

Clerkships

Students must complete 48 weeks of clerkships in eight specialties. Students will complete four week clerkships for Emergency Medicine and Neurology; six week clerkships for Family Medicine, Obstetrics & Gynecology, Pediatrics, and Psychiatry; and eight week clerkships for Internal Medicine and Surgery. Each student will assume increasing patient care responsibility commensurate with achievement of specific milestones and competencies defined by the Curriculum Committee. A longitudinal educational experience will be provided throughout the clerkships to cover topics that are relevant to all disciplines.

Electives/Selectives

Electives and selectives expose students to additional medical specializations and/or allow the student to return to a core specialty with advanced duties and responsibilities. Students may begin electives following the completion of the preclinical curriculum.  Selectives can be taken after the completion of the clerkships, and consist of a four week inpatient selective and a four week ambulatory selective. Third-year elective experiences allow students to explore other specialties and subspecialties or engage in research before fourth year while still consolidating core knowledge and skills.

Doctor of Medicine (M.D.) Sample Plans of Study:

The tables below represent courses the students will take in their preclinical and clinical years.

Preclinical Curriculum

CIRC 5001Medicine, Behavior & Society Longitudinal Module6
CIRC 5003Language of Medicine Longitudinal Module5.4
CIRC 5005Clinical Skills Longitudinal Module14.75
CIRC 5007Fundamentals: Molecules to Medicine9
CIRC 5009Attack and Defense9
CIRC 5011Circulation5
CIRC 5013Respiratory Health4
CIRC 5015Renal and Male Reproductive5
CIRC 5017Hematology3
CIRC 6007Mind, Brain and Behavior9
CIRC 6009Endocrine & Female Reproductive7
CIRC 6011Digestive Health and Nutrition7
CIRC 6013Form & Function: Skin, Muscles & Bones7.5
Total Credit Hours91.65

Clinical Curriculum

INTD 3030Clinical Foundations3
MEDI 3105Medicine Clerkship8
SURG 3005Surgery Clerkship8
FMED 3005Family Medicine Clerkship6
OBGY 3005Obstetric/Gynecology Clerkship6
PEDI 3005Pediatrics Clerkship6
PSYC 3005Psychiatry Clerkship6
EMED 3005Emergency Medicine Core Clerkship4
NEUR 3005Neurology Core Clerkship4
1 Four-Week Selective (Inpatient Service)4
1 Four-Week Selective (Ambulatory Care)4
20 Weeks of Electives20
4 Weeks of Senior Didactics4
Total Credit Hours83

M.D./Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery (OMS) Certificate Program Plan of Study

 Preclinical Curriculum

INTD 3030Clinical Foundations3
CIRC 6007Mind, Brain and Behavior9
CIRC 6009Endocrine & Female Reproductive7
CIRC 6011Digestive Health and Nutrition7
CIRC 5005Clinical Skills Longitudinal Module14.75
Students are on OMS rotation in mid December after formal semester ends
CIRC 5017Hematology3
CIRC 5013Respiratory Health4
CIRC 5011Circulation5
CIRC 5015Renal and Male Reproductive5
CIRC 5005Clinical Skills Longitudinal Module14.75
Students are on OMS rotation in mid June after formal semester ends

Clinical Curriculum

OBGY 3005Obstetric/Gynecology Clerkship6
PSYC 3005Psychiatry Clerkship6
PEDI 3005Pediatrics Clerkship6
FMED 3005Family Medicine Clerkship6
MEDI 3105Medicine Clerkship8
SURG 3005Surgery Clerkship8
NEUR 3005Neurology Core Clerkship4
EMED 3005Emergency Medicine Core Clerkship4

Advanced Clinical Rotations

The advanced clinical rotations are designed to prepare students for their one-year graduate surgical training prior to the two-year advanced OMS specialty rotations. 

Inpatient sub-internship selective 4 weeks:
ANES 4002Critical Care4
Ambulatory care selective 4 weeks and an elective 20 weeks:
SURG 4012Oral Maxillofacial Surgery4
Didactics 4 weeks:
EMSP 4100Advanced Cardiac Life Support1
INTD 4105Medical Jurisprudence0.5
MEDI 4115Palliative Care0.5
PATH 4290Clinically Applied Laboratory Medicine (CALM)0.5
Three didactic electives chosen by the student (0.5 hours/elective)
Students are on OMS rotation for additional 16 weeks

Students must also pass USMLE Step 1 and USMLE Step 2 CK/CS within three attempts as a requirement for medical school graduation.

Of note during all three years of the M.D. component of the OMS Certificate Program, students may have additional didactic or clinical training requirements that are outside the typical School of Medicine Academic Calendar. These additional requirements are not mandatory requirements for the M.D. degree, but are necessary requirements for the OMS Certificate.

Doctor of Medicine (M.D.) Policies                                             

Medical Student Background Check Policy

Applicability

This policy applies to applicants who have received an offer of admission to The University of Texas School of Medicine at San Antonio (SOM) and current students anticipating clinical assignments. Visiting students assigned placements in an affiliated clinical facility are also subject to the policy.

Policy

Applicants who have received an offer of admission must submit to and satisfactorily complete a background check review as a condition of matriculation to the SOM. An offer of admission will not be final until the completion of the criminal background check(s) with results deemed satisfactory. Admission may be denied or rescinded based on a review of the criminal background check.

Additionally, students who are currently enrolled may have to submit to, and satisfactorily complete, a background check review as a condition to enrolling or participating in educational experiences at affiliated clinical sites as required. Students who return from a leave of absence may also require a criminal background check. Students who refuse to submit to the criminal background check or do not pass the criminal background check review may be dismissed from the medical education program.

Rationale

  1. Health care providers are entrusted with the health, safety, and welfare of patients, have access to controlled substances and confidential information, and operate in settings that require the exercise of good judgment and ethical behavior. Thus, an assessment of an applicant’s or current student’s suitability to function in these settings is imperative to promote the highest level of integrity in health care services.
  2. Clinical facilities are increasingly required by accreditation agencies, such as the Joint Commission of Healthcare Organization, to conduct background checks for security purposes on individuals who provide services within the facility and especially those who supervise care and render treatment. To facilitate this requirement, educational institutions have agreed to conduct these background checks for students and faculty.
  3. Clinical rotations are essential components of the medical school curriculum. Students who cannot participate in clinical rotations due to criminal or other adverse activities that are revealed in the criminal background check are unable to fulfill the requirements of medical school. Additionally, many health-care licensing agencies require individuals to pass the criminal background check as a condition of licensure or employment. Therefore, it is important to resolve these issues prior to a commitment of resources by the applicant, the current student or the SOM.
  4. The SOM is obligated to meet the contractual requirements contained in affiliation agreements between the SOM and the various clinical facilities.

Background Check Report

  1. The SOM will designate approved company(ies) to conduct the criminal background check and issue reports directly to the SOM. Results from a company other than those designated by the SOM will not be accepted. Applicants who have received an offer of admission and current students must contact a designated company and comply with its instructions in authorizing and obtaining the criminal background check. Applicants who have received an offer of admission and current students are responsible for payment of any fees charged by a designated company to provide the criminal background check.
  2. Criminal background checks include the following and cover at least the past seven years:
    1. Criminal history search, including convictions, deferred adjudications or judgments, and pending criminal charges involving felonies, Class A, Class B, and Class C violations
    2. Social Security Number verification
    3. Violent Sexual Offender and Predator Registry search
    4. Office of the Inspector General (OIG) List of Excluded Individuals/Entities
    5. General Services Administration (GSA) List of Parties Excluded from Federal Programs
    6. U.S. Treasury Office of Foreign Assets Control (OFAC), List of Specially Designated Nationals (SDN)
    7. Applicable State Exclusion List
  3. Applicants who have received an offer of admission and current students have the right to review the information reported by a designated company for accuracy and completeness and to request that a designated company verify that the background information is correct. Prior to making a final determination that will adversely affect the applicant or current student, the SOM will provide the applicant or student a copy of or access to the background check report in order to question the accuracy of the report. The designated company is not involved in any decisions made by the SOM.

Procedure

               Applicants

  1. Applicants must complete the required criminal background check following the offer of admission but prior to matriculation.
  2. The criminal background check report will be submitted to and reviewed by the Office of Undergraduate Medical Education (UME). If the report contains concerning findings, the Office of UME may request that the applicant submit additional information related to the finding, such as a written explanation, court documents, and/or police reports. The UME will review all available relevant information and determine appropriate action.
  3. The SOM has authority to refuse the admission of the applicant to the SOM. The SOM decisions are final and may not be appealed.

Current Students

  1. Students satisfactorily completed the criminal background check at the time of admission into the medical education program. Students may have to complete the criminal background check review prior to commencement of an assignment to a clinical facility. Students who return from a leave of absence may require the criminal background check. If a legal violation occurs after matriculation, it is the student’s duty to report the violation to the Office of UME within 30 days. These students may also require satisfactory completion of the criminal background check.  Violations include if you have ever been arrested, charged, or convicted of a misdemeanor or a felony. Serious traffic offenses such as reckless driving, driving under the influence of alcohol and/or drugs, hit and run, evading a peace officer, failure to appear, driving while the license is suspended or revoked MUST be reported.  This list is not all-inclusive, and if in doubt as to whether an offense should be disclosed then it is better to disclose.
  2. Criminal background check reports will be submitted to the Office of UME for review. If the report contains concerning findings, the Office of UME may request that the student submit additional information related to the finding, such as a written explanation, court documents and/or police reports. The Office of UME will review all available relevant information and take immediate action related to the student’s participation in clinical activities, pending full review and decision by the Student Promotions Committee (SPC).

Review Standards

In reviewing the background check reports and any submitted information, the following information may be considered in making determinations: the nature and seriousness of the offense or event, the circumstances surrounding the offense or event, the relationship between the duties to be performed as part of the medical education program and the committed offense, the age of the person when the offense or event occurred, whether the offense or event was an isolated or repeated incident, the length of time that has passed since the offense or event, past employment and history of academic or disciplinary misconduct, evidence of successful rehabilitation, and  the  accuracy  of  the information provided by the applicant who has received an offer of admission or current student in the application materials, disclosure forms, or other materials. Decisions will be made bearing in mind both the safety interests of the patient and the learning environment, as well as the educational interest of the student. In reviewing background checks and supplementary information, advice may be obtained from the Health Science Center Office of Legal Affairs or UT System Office of General Counsel, Health Science Center police, or other appropriate advisors.

Confidentiality and Record Keeping

  1. Criminal background check reports and other submitted information are confidential and may only be reviewed by Health Science Center officials and affiliated clinical facilities in accordance with the Family Educational Records and Privacy Act (FERPA).
  2. Students: Criminal background check reports and other submitted information will be maintained in the Office of UME in accordance with the Health Science Center’s record retention policy for student records.
  3. Applicants Denied Matriculation: Criminal background check reports and other submitted information of applicants denied matriculation into the medical education program will be maintained in accordance with the Health Science Center’s record retention policy.

Other Provisions

  1. The SOM shall inform the applicant/current student who has concerning findings in the criminal background check report. The SOM’s decision to allow the individual to enroll in the medical education program is not a guarantee that every clinical facility will permit the student to participate at its clinical sites, or that any state will accept the individual as a candidate for registration, permit, or licensure. An assigned clinical facility may require a repeat criminal background check. The individual must accept the potential for an inability to complete medical educational degree requirements if the individual is denied participation at a clinical facility fulfilling an essential irreplaceable clinical experience. Clinical affiliates may adopt more stringent requirements than those of the SOM.
  2. The SOM may require repeat criminal background checks for continuously enrolled students. A student who has a break in enrollment such as a leave of absence may be required to complete the re-entry criminal background check.
  3. Falsification of information, including omission of relevant information, may result in denial of admission or dismissal from the medical education program.
  4. Criminal activity that occurs while a student is in attendance at the SOM may result in disciplinary action, including dismissal, and will be addressed through the charge of the SPC.

Policy for Sharing Student Background Checks

  1. Authorization to share information: Student background check reports maintained by educational institutions are records subject to FERPA. FERPA prohibits the release of educational records without the student’s written authorization unless there is a specific FERPA exception authorizing the release. Given that an affiliated clinical facility is offering educational services that would otherwise be provided by the educational institution, FERPA can be reasonably interpreted to permit the institution to release the information to the clinical facility without the student’s authorization. NOTE: HIPAA is not applicable to this scenario.
    1. A general notice will be provided to students that background check reports may be provided to affiliated clinical facilities at which students will attend as part of their required course of study.
    2. A general release will be obtained from students at the time of the criminal background check that authorizes the release of reports or results to any affiliated clinical facility to which students may be assigned.
    3. Information will be released to the affiliated clinical facility upon its request.
  2. Requests   for   Information: Request for criminal background check reports must be submitted in writing by the affiliated clinical facility and state the reason why the information is needed. All requests will be handled by the Office for Student Affairs. Requests for information records will be maintained for as long as the background check reports are maintained.
  3. Transmission of Information: Educational records will be sent to the clinical facility in a confidential manner. This can be achieved either by mailing the information and marking the outside of the envelope confidential, or scanning and e-mailing the records directly to the secure e-mail address for receipt of confidential information as identified by the clinical facility, preferably in the affiliation agreement.
  4. Confidentiality of Information: In releasing educational records to a clinical facility, FERPA requires that the clinical facility maintains the confidentiality of the educational records while the records are in its possession. The affiliated clinical facility will be informed in writing that:
    1. the information is confidential and subject to FERPA;
    2. the information may only be viewed by individuals who have a legitimate need to view the information to verify or audit the qualifications of the student to participate in the medical education program at the clinical facility;
    3. the information may not be disclosed to other entities without the student’s written authorization;
    4. the information must be destroyed when it is no longer needed for the purposes for which the information was provided to the clinical facility; and
    5. improper disclosure of personally identifiable information contained within the report may result in the Health Science Center being prohibited from providing the clinical facility access to this information for at least five years.
  5. Affiliation or Program Agreements:  Affiliation agreements may include a reference for requirements of criminal background checks. If criminal background check reports are shared with the clinical facility, the clinical facility is subject to the requirements of  FERPA as to any documents received by the clinical facility from the SOM regarding the student.

Advanced Standing

The acceptance of students with advanced standing is at the sole discretion of the Office of UME. Each year the SOM considers class size and the imperative of maintaining high quality training in deciding whether additional students with advanced standing will be admitted. In such rare cases, only students currently enrolled in an LCME-accredited medical school who are in good academic standing can be considered. Preference is given to those who have not only the consent but also the active support of their schools for the proposed move. The SOM will determine in each case the viability of the proposed transfer from an academic viewpoint and establish the necessary courses and other requirements and level at which the transfer would take place. No transfers for advanced standing will occur prior to the end of the traditional preclinical curriculum. Application forms and inquiries concerning advanced standing admission should be obtained from and addressed to the Vice Dean for UME. A nonresident of the state of Texas cannot be enrolled with advanced standing if the result of that enrollment would cause the percentage of nonresidents enrolled in the class of interest to rise above ten percent.


Grades

The SOM Curriculum Committee (CC) is the body that provides central oversight and makes recommendations to the Dean of the SOM and Dean delegates for the overall design, management and evaluation of a coherent and coordinated curriculum. The SPC is charged with review of the academic progress and professional development of each student during all components of the four-year medical education program, making recommendations to the Dean of the SOM and Dean delegates. The SPC has primary responsibility for recommending graduation only those candidates who have satisfactorily completed all graduation requirements and demonstrated the professional conduct appropriate for a physician.

For purposes of the policy, the preclinical years include modules taught from the beginning of the first academic year through mid-spring of second academic year. The clinical years include all clerkships and selective/elective courses. The academic standards for successful completion of a preclinical module are determined by the module director, adhering to a grading rubric approved by the CC, but may be appealed to the SPC. In the clinical years, academic standards for successful completion of a clerkship or selective/elective are determined by the clerkship or course director, remaining within the bounds of applicable CC standardization and subject to SPC appeal.

The grade composition for preclinical modules and clerkships is set by the module/clerkship leaders in accordance with the CC policy and UME standards. Final grades are calculated and released to students no later than 6 weeks after the end of a module, clerkship, elective, or selective. Final grades in the curriculum will be submitted to the Office of UME and ratified by the SPC. 

Grades for Preclinical Modules and Clerkships

Grades are based on an A, B, C, F system for all preclinical modules and clerkships. Grades of A, B, and C are considered passing. A=outstanding performance, B=very good performance, C=satisfactory performance and F=indicates failing performance. No grade of D will be issued. The grade of Incomplete (I) is reserved for circumstances in which academic work is not completed due to illness, family emergency, or other non-academic extenuating circumstances. A grade of I is disallowed for substandard academic performance.

For purposes of class rank, each letter grade is assigned a point value as follows:

Letter Grade Grade Point Average
A4 points
B3 points
C2 points
F 0 points

Remediation grades (as described below) will be classified as “Pass” or “Fail”. For purposes of class rank, a course that is remediated to a “Pass” will be given the same grade point value as a “C.”

Class rank will be calculated twice during the four year medical education program as follows: 1) at the conclusion of the pre-clinical curriculum 2) at the date that the clerkships must be completed during the clinical years.

Grades for Electives and Selectives

Grades for electives and selectives will be based on a pass/fail system. Clinical course student assessment is based on competency and professionalism as per the elective or selective grading rubric. 


Academic Progression

Student Promotions Committee

The Student Promotions Committee (SPC) monitors the progress of students throughout the four-year medical education program. Students must satisfactorily complete all required modules in the preclinical years and all required clerkships and courses in the clinical years, as well as meet pre-determined requirements for additional selectives and electives, to progress through the medical education program and be recommended for graduation. Remediation guidelines are set by the CC, but the SPC makes final remediation and progression decisions after a review of the individual student’s performance in modular components and previous modules. Certain curricular component remediation guidelines state that demonstration of competency in the domain of concern during the next module is sufficient. 

Interruptions to Academic Progression

Interrupted Progress for Academic Reasons

The SPC considers a variety of approaches to interrupted academic progress. These approaches may include Remediation, Repetition, and/or Dismissal.

Remediation is an academic activity designed to correct a failure in the preclinical years or a clerkship or course in the clinical years. As module grades are derived from different components, students who fail to meet passing standards in any component will receive a failing grade. Module remediation policies are set jointly by the CC and SPC. Only students who have not failed another module in the same academic year or two prior courses are eligible for remediation. When remediation is approved to correct a failure, the nature of the remediation activity will be determined by the SPC according to established policy. 

Students who are successful in remediation activities continue in their academic progression. Successful remediation of any failed curricular component will be transmitted to the registrar and recorded on a student’s official transcript as “F-Remediated to Pass”. 

Repetition is a specific remediation activity that consists of repeating part or all of an academic year due to substandard academic performance.  When repetition is approved to correct a failure, the nature of the remediation activity will be determined by the SPC according to established policy. 

Dismissal means permanent separation from the SOM and will be warranted in some instances, as outlined below.

Interrupted Progress for Non-Academic Reasons

Students may elect to take a Leave of Absence (LOA) from the SOM.  Some reasons for LOA include, but are not limited to, medical/health reasons, personal reasons, research/special study, etc.  Students must meet with the Office of Student Affairs, complete an internal UME ‘LOA Request Form’, and if approved, they must then complete the ‘Student Clearance Form’ from the Office of the University Registrar.  It is the student's responsibility to contact the Office of UME for advisement 90 days prior to the agreed upon return date.  Upon return from the LOA, the student will resume course/clinical work.    

Policy on Academic Progression

Year 1

1. Failure of modules:                      

a. one module failed in Year 1:     Remediation activity

b. two modules failed in Year 1:     Repetition of all modules in Year 1

c. three or more modules failed in Year 1:     Dismissal from the SOM

2. Failure of a remediation activity:

a. remediation activity failed in Year 1:     Repetition of all modules in Year 1

Year 2

1. Failure of modules:                      

a. one module failed in Year 2:     Remediation activity

b. two modules failed in Year 2 (excluding longitudinal modules):     Repetition of all modules in Year 2 including portion of longitudinal module in Year 2

c. two modules failed in Year 2 (including one longitudinal module):     Remediation of each module in Year 2

d. three or more courses failed in Year 2:     Dismissal from the SOM

2. Failure of a remediation activity:

a. remediation activity failed in Year 2:     Repetition of all modules in Year 2, including portion of longitudinal module in Year 2

Clerkships

1. One failure:

a. NBME exam failed:      Remediation by exam

b. failure of the clinical portion of the clerkship:     Repetition of all components of the clerkship

2. Two failures:

a. NBME exam failed:     Remediation by exam    

b. failure of the clinical portion of the clerkship:     Dismissal from the SOM

3. Three failures:

a. NBME exam failed:     Dismissal from the SOM    

Electives/Selectives

1. One failure for any reason:     No credit for course

2. Two failures for any reason:     Dismissal from the SOM

Year 1 through Year 4

1. Three courses failed Year 1 through 4:     Dismissal from the SOM

2. Students will not be allowed to participate in either the first-year curriculum or the second-year curriculum more than twice. Failing to meet benchmarks for progression to the next level of training during a second encounter with the first- or second-year curriculum meets criteria for dismissal.

3. Students who repeat an entire academic year must meet established benchmarks for promotion to the next academic level wholly within the repeated academic year. Courses with passing grades from the initial unsuccessful academic year will not carry forward. In this situation, any failure of a previously passed course will count as a failure and be subject to this policy.

4. Students who repeat a preclinical module, an elective course, or a core clerkship due to previous failure of that same module, course, or clerkship, and who fail a second time, meet criteria for dismissal.

5. The SPC can mandate a LOA for the student experiencing difficulty.

6. The SPC can mandate that a struggling student be required to meet with the Deans for Student Affairs and for Curriculum.

7. Restrictions on activities for students in academic difficulty:  A student with any failure in an academic year is restricted from participating in Health Science Center extracurricular activities until successful remediation has occurred.  This may include being removed from an office or activity in which the student is currently participating.


NBME Comprehensive Basic Science Exam

The National Board of Medical Examiners (NBME) offers the Comprehensive Basic Science Exam (CBSE), an achievement test covering material typically learned during basic science education. The CBSE is designed to reflect the content of USMLE Step 1 exam, and is typically used to gauge readiness for USMLE Step 1 and to identify areas of individual strength and weakness in basic science material. Scores on CBSE can be correlated to scores on USMLE Step 1.

All students must take the CBSE at the conclusion of the preclinical phase of the curriculum at a date and time established by the Office of UME. Students are subject to a testing algorithm and to meeting score benchmarks established by the Office of UME in order to progress to the clinical/elective phase of the curriculum, including clerkships. Inability to test on that date may delay planned coursework. Students who miss testing on this date must participate in the testing algorithm by taking the CBSE at the next offered opportunity.

On this initial CBSE administration:

  1. Students who meet or exceed a CBSE score benchmark (established by the Office of UME and communicated to students in advance of the test) may proceed to take clerkships/electives, as well as USMLE Step 1.

  2. Students who score below the benchmark established by the Office of UME cannot proceed to take clerkships/electives, nor to take USMLE Step 1.

  3. Students who score below the benchmark established by the Office of UME for the initial CBSE are required to continue in the CBSE testing algorithm until they demonstrate a score that equates to or exceeds a passing score on USMLE Step 1. The Office of UME will provide opportunities every 4-6 weeks for students who remain in the testing algorithm to sit for a CBSE.

On these subsequent CBSE administrations:

  1. Students who meet or exceed a score that equates to a passing score on USMLE Step 1 may proceed to take clerkships/electives, as well as USMLE Step 1.

  2. Students who do not achieve a score that equates to a passing score on USMLE Step 1 cannot proceed to take clerkships/electives, nor to take USMLE Step 1.

  3. Students who remain in the testing algorithm into their chronological third year of medical school may experience a delay in graduation.

  4. All students remain subject to the timelines for taking and passing USMLE Step 1 as outlined below in the policy “United States Medical Licensing Examination”.


United States Medical Licensing Examination

The United States Medical Licensing Examination (USMLE) is jointly sponsored by the NBME and the Federation of State Medical Boards. A passing score on each portion of the USMLE is accepted by medical boards in every state as evidence of core competency to practice medicine. The current required exams are USMLE Step 1, USMLE Step 2 CK (Clinical Knowledge), USMLE Step 2 CS (Clinical Skills), and Step 3. Step 3 is taken after medical school graduation.

It is essential that medical students meet required benchmarks that lead to medical licensure. Although designed for the purpose of licensing physicians, scores on USMLE Step 1 and USMLE Step 2 CK are often used by graduate medical education programs in decisions to interview and rank medical students for residency positions. It is therefore incumbent upon the SOM to establish policies pertaining to the timing and passage of the USMLE in order to optimize career outcomes for students and to ensure that graduates meet at least minimal licensing requirements.

Policy on Failure of USMLE Step 1

  • Students must take and pass USMLE Step 1 in order to graduate from the SOM.
  • Students must take USMLE Step 1 following these established rules:    
    • Students must take USMLE Step 1 prior to December 15 of the chronological third year of the medical education program.  Any student who does not meet this deadline will be forwarded to the SPC. The student will be allowed to continue with coursework while awaiting the scheduled exam date.
    • If the student has not made a first attempt on USMLE Step 1 by July 1 of the chronological fourth year of the medical education program, he/she will be placed on a mandatory LOA until the exam is taken. Graduation may be delayed.
    • If a passing score is not achieved on the first attempt, the student will have the option to immediately make a second attempt to pass USMLE Step 1 or to complete additional coursework prior to a second attempt.
    • If necessary, a second attempt on USMLE Step 1 must be completed by July 1 of the chronological fourth year of the medical education program. Failure to do so by this date will result in the student being placed on a mandatory LOA until the exam is taken, at which time coursework can resume.  Graduation may be delayed. 
    • Clinical coursework can resume while awaiting the score from a second attempt on USMLE Step 1.
    • A second failure on USMLE Step 1 will result in the student being placed on a mandatory LOA until he/she completes and receives a passing score on a third attempt on USMLE Step 1, after which time coursework can resume. Graduation may be delayed.
    • A student who fails to achieve a passing score on USMLE Step 1 within three attempts meets criteria for dismissal from the SOM.

Policy on Failure of USMLE Step 2 CK 

  • Students must take and pass USMLE Step 2 CK in order to graduate from the SOM.
  • Students must take USMLE Step 2 CK following these established rules:    

    • Students are strongly encouraged to take USMLE Step 2 CK by September of the chronological fourth year of the medical education program.

    • Students must take USMLE Step 2 CK by December 15 of the chronological fourth year of the medical education program.  Any student who does not meet this deadline will be forwarded to the SPC.  The reason for the deficiency and the scheduled exam date will be provided to the SPC.

    • If the student has not taken USMLE Step 2 CK by December 15 of his/her chronological fourth year of the medical education program, he/she will be placed on a mandatory LOA until the exam is taken. Clinical coursework can resume while awaiting the score on USMLE Step CK.

    • If a passing score is not achieved on the first attempt, the student will schedule a second attempt to pass USMLE Step 2 CK at the earliest time available. The student will be allowed to continue coursework while awaiting the scheduled exam date.

    • A second failure on USMLE Step 2 CK will result in the student being placed on a mandatory LOA until he/she completes and receives a passing score on a third attempt on USMLE Step 2 CK. Clinical coursework can resume while awaiting the score from a second attempt on USMLE Step CK. Graduation may be delayed.

    • If the student has not passed USMLE Step 2 CK by the graduation date, he/she will not receive a diploma for the M.D. degree with his/her class. The student will remain a fourth year student until the exam is taken and passed.

    • If the exam in not taken and passed by one year after the student’s original graduation date or by six years after matriculation into medical school (whichever comes first), the student meets criteria for dismissal from the SOM.

    • A student who fails to achieve a passing score on USMLE Step 2 CK within three attempts meets criteria for dismissal from the SOM.

Policy on Failure of USMLE Step 2 CS 

  • Students must take and pass USMLE Step 2 CS in order to graduate from the SOM.

  • Students must take USMLE Step 2 CS following these established rules:    
    • Students are strongly encouraged to take USMLE Step 2 CS by October of the chronological fourth year of the medical education program.
    • Students must take Step 2 CS by November 1 of the chronological fourth year of the medical education program. Any student who does not meet the November 1 deadline will be forwarded to the SPC. The reason for the deficiency and the scheduled exam date will be provided to the SPC.  The student will be allowed to continue with coursework while awaiting the scheduled exam date. 
    • If a passing score is not achieved on the first attempt, the student will schedule a second attempt at the earliest time available. The student will be allowed to continue coursework while awaiting the scheduled exam date.
    • A second failure on USMLE Step 2 CS will result in the student being placed on a mandatory LOA until he/she completes and receives a passing score on a third attempt on USMLE Step 2 CS. Clinical coursework can resume while awaiting the score from a second attempt on USMLE Step CS. Graduation may be delayed.
    • If a student has not passed USMLE Step 2 CS by the graduation date, he/she will not receive a diploma for the M.D. degree with his/her class. The student will remain a fourth year student until the exam is taken and passed.
    • If the exam is not taken and passed by one year after the student’s original graduation date or by six years after matriculation into medical school (whichever comes first), the student meets criteria for dismissal from the SOM.
    • The student who fails to achieve a passing score on USMLE Step 2 CS within three attempts meets criteria for dismissal from the SOM.

Academic Dismissal

Authority for decisions on dismissal for academic reasons resides with the SPC.

Students meet criteria for dismissal from the SOM as per CC and SPC policy. Criteria for dismissal are described in the sections above.

Additional criteria for dismissal from the SOM for academic reasons include:

  1. No more than two years may be taken to complete any one year of the medical education program.
  2. No more than six years may be taken to complete the medical education program without permission from the SPC.
  3. Students exhibiting egregious or a pattern of unprofessional behavior.

Graduation

The degree of Doctor of Medicine (M.D.) is awarded by the Board of Regents upon a student’s successful completion of the graduation requirements, recommendation of the Faculty Council to the Dean of the SOM, and certification by the Dean of the SOM to the President of the UT Health Science Center at San Antonio. Candidates must:

  1. be at least 18 years of age at the time the degree is awarded
  2. present evidence of good moral character
  3. offer evidence of having satisfactorily fulfilled all academic requirements of the four year medical education program
  4. comply with all necessary legal and financial requirements

Scholastic Honors

Alpha Omega Alpha Honor Medical Society

Alpha Omega Alpha (AOA) Honor Medical Society is a national professional organization whose aims are the “promotion of scholarship and research in medical schools, the encouragement of a high standard of character and professionalism among medical students and graduates, and the recognition of high attainment and service in medical science, patient care, and related fields”. Election is based on academic excellence, and on activities and achievements that promote the values of AOA. The top 25 percent of the graduating medical school class is eligible for nomination to the society. From this top quartile of students, up to one-sixth of the class may be elected to the society based on academic achievement, leadership, character, community service, and professionalism. Students may be chosen in the junior or senior year.

Gold Humanism Honor Society

The Gold Humanism Honor Society, sponsored by the Arnold P. Gold Foundation, recognizes students who best exemplify and manifest humanism in their interactions with patients, peers, faculty, and community. Additionally, elected students demonstrate excellence in clinical care, leadership, compassion and dedication to service. Society membership participates in a community service project that is formulated by the group. 


Code of Professional Conduct

Preamble 

Because practicing medicine is an honor earned every day, we—the faculty and students of the SOM —subscribe to the highest standards of conduct. Our aim is professional behavior beyond reproach. In particular, we subscribe to the following points of conduct: 

Code 

I will promote and maintain an honest and effective learning environment. I will: 

• do my part to ensure that the environment promotes acquisition of knowledge and mastery of skills, including the timely submission of constructive feedback and evaluation; 

• not tolerate harassment, flagrant disruption of the learning process, demeaning language or visual aids, disrespectful behavior, or lack of respect for life and living things; 

• exhibit the highest standards of conduct, honesty, and professionalism; 

• identify and report those who exhibit academic or professional misconduct; and 

• appreciate each individual as a person of value and help maintain dignity during the learning process. 

I will place primary emphasis on the health and welfare of patients. I will: 

• attain and maintain the most current knowledge in the healing arts and the skills to apply that knowledge; 

• display respect and compassion for each patient; 

• foster and preserve the trust that exists between the health care professional and the patient;

• respect and maintain the confidentiality of the patient; and 

• let no patient in whose care I participate suffer physically or emotionally as a consequence of unprofessional behavior by myself or others. 

I will conduct myself at all times in a professional manner. I will: 

• exhibit honesty, openness, and evenhandedness in dealing with others; 

• maintain my personal hygiene and appearance in such a way that it does not interfere with my ability to communicate with patients, colleagues, or community; 

• not engage in language or behavior which is disrespectful, abusive, or insulting; 

• take responsibility for my actions, acknowledge my limitations, and ask for assistance when needed; 

• assure the welfare of others is not compromised as a result of my inadequacy or impairment; 

• not be deceitful or self-serving; 

• achieve satisfactory balance in personal, community, and professional activities; 

• not allow personal conflicts to interfere with objectivity in relationships with colleagues or patients; 

• accommodate a fellow health care professional’s request for my knowledge and expertise; 

• refrain from the manifestation of bias, including sexual, marital, racial, ethnic, or cultural harassment; 

• support my fellow health care professionals if they should falter; and 

• identify colleagues whose ability to provide care is impaired, support them as they seek rehabilitation, and help them to reintegrate into the medical community. 

http://som.uthscsa.edu/StudentAffairs/documents/CodeofProfessionalConductSOM_000.pdf

Administration of the Code of Professional Conduct for Students  

Medical students are expected to maintain the highest standards of professional and ethical conduct. Medical students are expected to conduct themselves in a professional manner in interaction not only with patients, but also with peers, faculty, and staff of the Health Science Center and the broader community. The SOM, Health Science Center and UT System have written expectations of professional conduct. Medical students are governed by the above Code of Professional Conduct in the SOM. Each module, clerkship or course director may also develop written expectations of professional conduct. These expectations are distributed to students, or posted for each module, clerkship or course.

A report of professional misconduct is investigated in accordance with previously established policies and procedures within the SOM, Health Science Center and the UT System: 

At present a potential violation of professional conduct is reported to a Dean for Student Affairs who meets with the complainant to determine the charges and to explain the investigative process. If the charges are not in writing, the Dean for Student Affairs will prepare a statement of the charges and obtain verification of the charges from the complainant. The Dean for Student Affairs will be responsible for ensuring that no retaliation is made against the complainant. The Dean for Student Affairs will interview the accused student, allowing the accused student the opportunity to respond to the charges and to review the available evidence supporting the charges. The Dean for Student Affairs will interview others as indicated. All Health Science Center personnel and students must cooperate with the investigation. The investigation will be conducted in a timely manner. At the conclusion of the investigation, the Dean for Student Affairs will prepare a written report detailing the charges, the investigative process and the results of the investigation. The Dean for Student Affairs will present the written report to the SPC for recommendations. Any disciplinary action/sanction(s) recommended by the SPC shall be in accordance with applicable SOM and Health Science Center policies (see “sanctions” below). The decision of the SPC is final, pending further appeal to the Dean of the SOM. The sanctioned student may file a written appeal to the Dean of the SOM within five business days from receipt of the SPC written decision. Within 30 calendar days from receipt of the student’s appeal, the Dean of the SOM will provide a written decision to the student, the Vice Dean for Undergraduate Medical Education and the Chair of the SPC. The decision of the Dean of the SOM is final. Within five business days of the Dean of the SOM’s decision, the student may file a written appeal to a higher administrative institutional official, but only on procedural concerns (See “Medical Student Academic Grievance Procedures” for details).

The following sanctions may be assessed by the SPC or the Dean of the SOM:    

  1. Warning    
  2. Probation
  3. Withholding of grades, official transcript, and/or degree
  4. Bar against readmission
  5. Restitution or reimbursement for damage to or misappropriation of UT System or Health Science Center property
  6. Suspension of rights and privileges deriving in whole or in part for the SOM, including participation in extracurricular activities
  7. Suspension of eligibility for any student office or honor
  8. Cancellation of credit for scholastic work done
  9. Failing grade or reduction of a grade for an examination, assignment, or course
  10. Suspension from the Health Science Center for a specified period of time
  11. Dismissal
  12. Denial of degree
  13. Revocation of degree and withdrawal of diploma
  14. Formal letter of reprimand in the academic file
  15. Other sanction(s) as deemed appropriate under the circumstances

Medical Student Grievance Procedures

Academic Grievance

An academic grievance is a complaint regarding an academic decision or action that affects the student’s academic record. Academic grievances in the SOM may be handled by informal resolution or formal resolution.     

Procedure for Informal Resolution in the Preclinical Curriculum

A student who feels that he/she has an academic grievance in the preclinical curriculum, usually regarding an examination score, attendance record, or module grade, may attempt to informally resolve the concern by contacting the Dean of Curriculum in writing within five business days from the date the student knew or should have known of the academic concern. Within 30 calendar days from receipt of the student’s written communication, the Dean for Curriculum will investigate the concern and provide the student a written decision.    

Procedure for Informal Resolution in the Clinical Curriculum

A student who feels that he/she has an academic grievance in the clinical curriculum may attempt to informally resolve the concern by contacting the Clerkship Director/Course Director in writing within five business days from the date the student knew or should have known of the academic concern. The student will contact the Clerkship Director/Course Director to discuss the academic concern, usually related to narrative evaluation comments, attendance record, overall evaluation, an examination score or a course grade. The Clerkship Director/Course Director will investigate the student’s concern, employing departmental education processes such as committee review, as per departmental practice. Within 30 calendar days from receipt of the student’s written communication, the Clerkship Director/Course Director will investigate the concern and provide the student a written decision.

Procedure for Formal Resolution (“Appeal”) in the Preclinical and Clinical Curriculum

The process and procedures for formal academic grievance ("appeal") resolution are sequenced below. Academic grievance applies to concerns adversely influencing the student's academic status. Examples include, but are not limited to, examination score, module, course or clerkship grades, remediation, repetition, suspension, probation, professionalism sanctions, and dismissal.

1. A student must file written notice of appeal with the Dean for Student Affairs and the Chair of the SPC within five business days from the date the student knew or should have known of the concern, unless the student first pursues an informal grievance process. In that instance, the student must then file the formal written notice of appeal within five business days of the written decision for the informal grievance.

If the student chooses not to attempt informal resolution of a grievance, he/she must file a formal written notice of appeal not more than five business days from the date the student knew or should have known of the academic concern. 

2. The aggrieved student must meet with the Dean for Student Affairs to ensure factual accuracy of the basis for appeal, review the processes and procedures, and anticipate preparation of documentation for the SPC meeting. In the written appeal, the student must describe the rationale for the grievance in detail and propose a resolution. The entire written appeal, including all supporting documentation, must be submitted to the Dean for Student Affairs within ten business days from the date the student knew or should have known of the concern unless the student first pursues an informal grievance process. In that instance, the student must then file the formal grievance within ten business days of the written decision for the informal grievance.

An ad hoc group of the SPC, including the Chair of the SPC and two members of the SPC, will investigate the grievance, meeting with the student as necessary to ensure a comprehensive review. The Dean for Student Affairs will also be present to provide information as needed by the SPC ad hoc group, such as background information about SOM policies and course requirements, as well as information about a student’s global performance. The Chair of the SPC will present the student's written statement and any supporting documentation, as well as the ad hoc investigation of the formal grievance, to the SPC at the next scheduled SPC meeting. The SPC may defer a decision if more information/documentation is required to make a responsible decision, and may request a face-to-face meeting with the student prior to rendering a decision. The SPC will provide the student a written decision within five business days after the meeting. The decision of the SPC is final, pending appeal to the Dean of the SOM. The student continues in the curriculum until the appeal process is exhausted unless the student's continuance poses a safety concern.

3. The student may file a written secondary appeal to the Dean of the SOM within five business days from receipt of the SPC written decision. The student must also inform the Dean for Student Affairs in writing of the intent to appeal, also within the same five business days. The entire written appeal, including all supporting documentation, must be submitted within ten business days from receipt of the SPC written decision. The student's appeal portfolio must include a justification statement for secondary appeal, and all documentation in its entirety must be provided to the Dean for Student Affairs who will submit it to the Dean of the SOM. Upon review of the student's record and appeal portfolio, the Dean of the SOM may elect to:

a)    take no action, allowing the SPC decision to stand 

b)    modify the SPC decision 

c)    make an alternate decision

d)    impanel an ad hoc committee to re-examine the grievance and make recommendations

The ad hoc committee will be composed of three SOM faculty members appointed by the Dean of the SOM. Faculty disallowed includes members of the SPC, UME professional leadership, and module/clerkship/course directors. The committee will have full investigative authority and make recommendations directly to the Dean of the SOM. At the discretion of the Dean of the SOM and/or the ad hoc committee, a face-to-face meeting with the aggrieved student may be required. The Dean for Student Affairs will accompany the student in any/all face-to-face meetings with the Dean of the SOM and/or ad hoc committee. Within 30 calendar days from receipt of the student’s appeal, the Dean of the SOM will provide a written decision to the student, the Vice Dean for Undergraduate Medical Education and the Chair of the SPC. The decision of the Dean of the SOM is final. The Dean for Student Affairs will meet with the student to inform about the Dean of the SOM’s decision. At the next scheduled SPC meeting, the Chair of the SPC will present the Dean of the SOM’s decision for entry into the minutes. 

Nonacademic Grievance

A student who has a nonacademic grievance concerning perceived violation of her/his student rights; discrimination based on age, color, disability*, family status, gender, national origin, race, religion, veteran status, sexual orientation; or sexual harassment/sexual assault** may seek grievance resolution. The student may file a nonacademic grievance against another student, faculty, staff or official publication of the Health Science Center via a written statement to the Dean for Student Affairs. Nonacademic grievances in the SOM may be handled by informal resolution or formal resolution.

Procedure for Informal Resolution

A student pursuing an informal nonacademic grievance resolution must contact the Dean for Student Affairs, in writing, within five business days of the alleged grievance. If the grievance involves staff, faculty, student(s) from the broader Health Science Center community, the Dean for Student Affairs will liaison with other appropriate authorities, as indicated. The Dean for Student Affairs will assist the student in the informal resolution of the grievance, to be completed within 30 calendar days from the grievance stimulus. If an informal resolution is not achieved, the aggrieved student has an additional five business days to file a formal written grievance. 

Procedure for Formal Resolution

The process and procedure for formal nonacademic grievance resolution are sequenced below. 

  1. A student considering pursuit of a formal nonacademic grievance must contact the Dean for Student Affairs for review of applicable policies and procedures.
  2. A formal grievance must include the following information: relevant name(s), date(s), location(s), witness(es) and complete description(s) of the grievance and a proposed resolution, if possible. 
  3. The student must file the formal grievance, in writing, with the Dean for Student Affairs within five business days from the alleged grievance stimulus. A student initially attempting informal grievance must file the formal grievance, in writing, within five business days of the 30 calendar days allowed for informal resolution. 
  4. If the grievance involves/accuses Health Science Center non-medical students or employees, the Dean for Student Affairs will facilitate engagement with appropriate advocacy/supervisory institutional authorities to ensure that coordination of investigatory and resolution processes transcend interschool and student/employee boundaries.
  5. Copies of the written grievance will be made available to named parties and the appropriate advocacy/supervisory institutional authorities. 
  6. The Dean for Student Affairs and appropriate institutional authorities noted above may, at her/his discretion, hold discussions with or without the involved/accused individual(s) to hear and resolve the grievance, schedule a meeting between the student and the involved/accused individual(s) and/or involve other parties in facilitating a resolution of the grievance. This process will be afforded 30 calendar days from receipt of the formal written grievance to resolve the grievance, providing the aggrieved student a written summary of resolution. 
  7. If the aggrieved student is dissatisfied with the resolution, he/she may file a formal written appeal with the Dean of the SOM within five business days of receipt of the decision. The Dean of the SOM has 30 calendar days to provide a written decision to the student and to the Dean for Student Affairs. The decision of the Dean of the SOM is final.
  8. Within 5 business days of receipt of the Dean of the SOM’s decision, the student may file a formal written appeal to a higher administrative institutional official, but only for procedural concerns. 
  9. In rare circumstances the Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board (THECB) will investigate student complaints. Please refer to the THECB website for more information.

*see additional related Health Science Center policies/procedures: "Nondiscrimination Policy and Complaint Procedure" at www.uthscsa.edu/eeo/non-discrimination.asp.

**see additional related Health Science Center policies/procedures: "General Regulations and Requirements, Sexual Assault Policy" at www.uthscsa.edu/eeo/harassment.asp.


Student Mistreatment

Mistreatment of students will not be tolerated. Mistreatment, intentional or unintentional, occurs when behavior shows disrespect for the dignity of others and interferes with the learning process. Student mistreatment may take many forms all of which impact student performance. Sexual harassment and assault, which are defined by policy through the Health Science Center’s Equal Employment Opportunity/Affirmative Action Office, are included in this section as forms of student mistreatment. Student access to personnel and processes for resolution without retaliation is detailed below.

Examples of behavior that are unacceptable to the SOM and Health Science Center include: 

  • Physical or sexual harassment/assault
  • Discrimination or harassment based on race, gender, age, ethnicity, religious beliefs, sexual orientation, or disability 
  • Disparaging or demeaning comments about an individual or group  
  • Loss of personal civility including shouting, displays of temper, public or private abuse, belittling, or humiliation 
  • Use of grading or other forms of evaluation in a punitive or retaliatory manner 
  • Sending students on inappropriate errands 

Medical students who feel they have been mistreated may report such perceptions to any of the following: 

  • Dean for Student Affairs 
  • Director, Equal Employment Opportunity/Affirmative Action Office 
  • Student Counseling Center
  • Office of Student Services
  • Course/Clerkship Director 

These school representatives are empowered to informally discuss a student’s perceptions related to mistreatment, providing guidance. These school representatives should refer the student immediately to the Dean for Student Affairs for further instructions. 

A grievance involving perceived mistreatment can be resolved in an informal or a formal manner. A student pursuing an informal nonacademic grievance resolution must contact the Dean for Student Affairs, in writing, within five business days of the alleged grievance. (If the grievance involves staff, faculty, student(s) from the broader Health Science Center community, the Dean for Student Affairs will liaison with other appropriate authorities, as indicated.) The Dean for Student Affairs will assist the student in the informal resolution of the grievance, to be completed within 30 calendar days from the written grievance. If an informal resolution is not achieved, the aggrieved student has an additional five business days to file a formal written grievance. 

A student considering a formal nonacademic grievance must contact the Dean for Student Affairs for review of applicable policies and procedures. If the allegation is one of sexual harassment/assault, the Dean for Student Affairs will engage the Health Science Center’s Director of Equal Employment Opportunity/Affirmative Action Office. (Please see additional related policies “General Regulations and Requirements, Sexual Assault Policy” at www.uthscsa.edu/eeo/harassment.asp). 

The student must file a formal written grievance with the Dean for Student Affairs within five business days from the alleged incident. A student initially attempting informal grievance must file the formal grievance, in writing, within five business days of the 30 calendar days allowed for informal resolution. The formal grievance must include a detailed description of the grievance and a proposed resolution, if possible. If the grievance involves/accuses Health Science Center non-medical students or employees, the Dean for Student Affairs will facilitate engagement with appropriate advocacy/supervisory institutional authorities. Copies of the written grievance will be made available to named parties and the appropriate advocacy/supervisory institutional authorities. The Dean for Student Affairs (and appropriate institutional authorities noted above) may, at her/his discretion, hold discussions with or without the involved/accused individual(s) to hear and resolve the grievance, schedule a meeting between the student and the involved/accused individual(s) and/or involve other parties in facilitating a resolution of the grievance. This process will be afforded 30 calendar days from receipt of the written grievance to resolve the grievance, providing the aggrieved student a written summary of resolution. 

If the aggrieved student is dissatisfied with the resolution, he/she may file a formal written appeal with the Dean of the SOM within five business days of the decision. The decision of the Dean of the SOM is final. The Dean of the SOM has 30 calendar days to provide a written decision to the student and to the Dean for Student Affairs. 


Scholastic Dishonesty 

Medical students are expected to maintain the highest standards of professional and ethical conduct. Medical students are expected to conduct themselves in a professional manner in interaction not only with patients, but also with peers, faculty, and staff of the Health Science Center and the broader community. The SOM, Health Science Center and UT System have written expectations of professional conduct.  Medical students are governed by the Code of Professional Conduct in the SOM. Each module, clerkship or course director may also develop written expectations of professional conduct. These expectations are distributed to students, or posted for each module, clerkship or course.

A student who commits an act of scholastic dishonesty is subject to discipline, after thorough investigation by a Dean for Student Affairs. Scholastic dishonesty includes but is not limited to cheating, plagiarism, collusion, signing a classmate’s name for an activity or attendance, submission for credit of any work or materials that are attributable in whole or in part to another person, taking an examination for another person, any act designed to give unfair advantage to a student or the attempt to commit such acts. Any such act may also constitute a violation of professionalism by the student. 

Students should report such acts to a Dean for Student Affairs, the module/clerkship/course director, or other faculty. If the reporting is not made directly to the Dean for Student Affairs, then it will be the module/clerkship/course director or faculty’s responsibility to report to a Dean for Student Affairs. 

The conduct of the investigation of a report of scholastic dishonesty is in accordance with previously established policies and procedures within the SOM, Health Science Center and UT System: 

At present a potential act of scholastic dishonesty is reported to a Dean for Student Affairs who meets with the complainant to determine the charges and to explain the investigative process. If the charges are not in writing, the Dean for Student Affairs will prepare a statement of the charges and obtain verification of the charges from the complainant. The Dean for Student Affairs will be responsible for ensuring that no retaliation is made against the complainant. The Dean for Student Affairs will interview the accused student, allowing the accused student the opportunity to respond to the charges and to review the available evidence supporting the charges. The Dean for Student Affairs will interview others as indicated. All Health Science Center personnel and students must cooperate with the investigation. The investigation will be conducted in a timely manner. At the conclusion of the investigation, the Dean for Student Affairs will prepare a written report detailing the charges, the investigative process and the results of the investigation. The Dean for Student Affairs will present the written report to the SPC for recommendations. Any disciplinary action/sanction(s) recommended by the SPC shall be in accordance with applicable SOM and Health Science Center policies (see “sanctions” below). The decision of the SPC is final, pending further appeal to the Dean of the SOM. The sanctioned student may file a written appeal to the Dean of the SOM within five business days from receipt of the SPC written decision. Within 30 calendar days from receipt of the student’s appeal, the Dean of the SOM will provide a written decision to the student, the Vice Dean for Undergraduate Medical Education and the Chair of the SPC. The decision of the Dean of the SOM is final. Within five business days of the Dean of the SOM’s decision, the student may file a written appeal to a higher administrative institutional official, but only on procedural concerns (See “Medical Student Academic Grievance Procedures” for details).

The following sanctions may be assessed by the SPC or by the Dean of the SOM:    

  • Warning    
  • Probation
  • Withholding of grades, official transcript, and/or degree
  • Bar against readmission
  • Restitution or reimbursement for damage to or misappropriation of UT System or Health Science Center property
  • Suspension of rights and privileges deriving in whole or in part for the SOM, including participation in extracurricular activities
  • Suspension of eligibility for any student office or honor
  • Cancellation of credit for scholastic work done
  • Failing grade or reduction of a grade for an examination, assignment, or course
  • Suspension from the Health Science Center for a specified period of time
  • Dismissal
  • Denial of degree
  • Revocation of degree and withdrawal of diploma
  • Formal letter of reprimand in the academic file
  • Other sanction(s) as deemed appropriate under the circumstances

Standards of Conduct for the Teacher-Learner Relationship

The SOM is committed to creating an environment that promotes academic and professional success in learners and teachers at all levels. The institution strives to create an environment free of behaviors that can adversely affect the Teacher-Learner Relationship. Both teachers and learners share the responsibility in creating and maintaining this environment of respect, fairness, and trust.

Responsibilities in the Teacher-Learner Relationship

Responsibilities of teachers:

Treat all learners with respect, fairness, and equality regardless of age, gender, race, ethnicity, national origin, religion, disability, or sexual orientation

Responsibilities of learners:

Treat all fellow learners and teachers with respect, fairness, and equality regardless of age, gender, race, ethnicity, national origin, religion, disability, or sexual orientation

Behaviors Inappropriate to the Teacher-Learner Relationship

Behaviors that demonstrate disrespect for others or lack of professionalism in interpersonal conduct are inappropriate and will not be tolerated by the institution. These include, but are not limited to, the following:

  • unwanted physical contact (e.g. hitting, slapping, kicking, pushing) or threat of the same
  • unwanted verbal contact including loss of personal civility such as shouting, personal attacks, insults, or displays of temper (such as throwing objects)
  • sexual harassment (including romantic relationships between teachers and learners in which the teacher has authority over the learner’s academic progress) or harassment based on age, gender, race, ethnicity, national origin, religion, disability or sexual orientation
  • discrimination of any form including in teaching and assessment based upon age, gender, race, ethnicity, national origin, religion, disability, or sexual orientation
  • requests for others to perform inappropriate personal errands unrelated to the didactic, investigational, or clinical situation at hand
  • grading/evaluation on factors unrelated to performance, effort, or level of achievement

These inappropriate behaviors are presented to new Health Science Center employees in the form of a mandatory educational module through the Knowledge Center, and the information can also be found in the Handbook of Operating Procedures. Health Science Center employees review these standards of conduct in the form of a mandatory educational module through the Knowledge Center bi-yearly. Interns in all medical and surgical disciplines review policies regarding standards of conduct between teacher and learner during mandatory house staff orientation; interns, residents and faculty members review these standards of conduct during department-specific presentations designed to address AGCME core competencies. 

Medical students receive education on standards of conduct between teacher and learner during orientation, including an on line EEO/AA module addressing topics such as sexual harassment and sexual misconduct and actions taken if victimized. Many clerkship orientations also review these standards of conduct as important ACGME core competencies. 

If such inappropriate behaviors occur, the student is encouraged to state that to the behavior instigator. If the student is uncomfortable doing this, the next course of action is to report the inappropriate behavior to any of the following:

  • Dean for Student Affairs
  • Director, Equal Employment Opportunity/Affirmative Action Office
  • Counseling Services
  • Office of Student Services
  • Course/Clerkship Director

These school representatives are empowered to informally discuss the student’s perceptions related to inappropriate teacher-learner behavior, providing guidance. These school representatives should refer the student immediately to the Dean for Student Affairs for further instructions. 

A grievance involving an inappropriate teacher-learner relationship can be resolved in an informal or a formal manner. A student pursuing an informal nonacademic grievance resolution must contact the Dean for Student Affairs, in writing, within five business days of the alleged grievance. (If the grievance involves staff, faculty, student(s) from the broader Health Science Center community, the Dean for Student Affairs will liaison with other appropriate authorities, as indicated.) The Dean for Student Affairs will assist the student in the informal resolution of the grievance, to be completed within 30 calendar days from the written grievance. If an informal resolution is not achieved, the aggrieved student has an additional five business days to file a formal written grievance. 

A student considering a formal nonacademic grievance must contact the Dean for Student Affairs for review of applicable policies and procedures. If the allegation is one of sexual harassment/assault, the Dean for Student Affairs will engage the Health Science Center’s Senior Director, Student Success & Title IX Director. (Please see additional related policies “General Regulations and Requirements, Sexual Assault Policy” at www.uthscsa.edu/eeo/harassment.asp). 

The student must file a formal written grievance with the Dean for Student Affairs within five business days from the alleged incident. A student initially attempting informal grievance must file the formal grievance, in writing, within five business days of the 30 calendar days allowed for informal resolution. The formal grievance must include a detailed description of the grievance and a proposed resolution, if possible.  If the grievance involves/accuses Health Science Center non-medical students or employees, the Dean for Student Affairs will facilitate engagement with appropriate advocacy/supervisory institutional authorities. Copies of the written grievance will be made available to named parties and the appropriate advocacy/supervisory institutional authorities. The Dean for Student Affairs (and appropriate institutional authorities noted above) may, at her/his discretion, hold discussions with or without the involved/accused individual(s) to hear and resolve the grievance, schedule a meeting between the student and the involved/accused individual(s) and/or involve other parties in facilitating a resolution of the grievance. This process will be afforded 30 calendar days from receipt of the written grievance to resolve the grievance, providing the aggrieved student a written summary of resolution. 

If the aggrieved student is dissatisfied with the resolution, he/she may file a formal written appeal with the Dean of the SOM within five business days of the decision. The decision of the Dean of the SOM is final. The Dean of the SOM has 30 calendar days to provide a written decision to the student and to the Dean for Student Affairs. Within five business days of the Dean of the SOM’s decision, the student may file a written appeal to a higher administrative institutional official, but on for procedural concerns (See “Medical Student Nonacademic Grievance Procedures” for details).


Academic Advising

Academic, career and personal advising resources for medical students include: the Vice Dean for Undergraduate Medical Education, Deans for Student Affairs, Module, Clerkship and/or Course Directors, VERITAS Career Advising Leaders/Groups, and the Health Science Center’s Counseling Services. Additionally, academic and career advising activities are planned at specific junctures over the four year medical education program and delivered in many different formats.

VERITAS is the SOM’s student advising system. Each incoming student is randomly assigned to one of 20 VERITAS Groups. Each VERITAS Group is led by a clinical faculty member and three 4th year medical students (“Mentors in Medicine=MiMs”) and three 2nd year medical students (VERITAS Peer Advisors=VPA”). The groups are clustered into five societies. The structure of VERITAS allows a cohesive interclass system in which students receive consistent academic, career and personal advising in the same VERITAS groups over the four years of medical school. For career advising one resource accessed heavily is the AAMC “Careers in Medicine” program. 

For students who encounter academic difficulty, the module, clerkship or course director is typically the first line of consultation. Deans for Student Affairs, in consultation with the Vice Dean for Undergraduate Medical Education, monitor students’ progress through centralized processes in order to identify problems as early as possible and provide guidance accordingly.

A primary mission of the medical education program is to promote the retention and advancement of medical students throughout the four year curriculum. As such, student services and support include weekly Deans' Hours, individual and group tutoring, large-group review sessions for preclinical courses, consultation services for study skills, time management issues, test-taking assistance, and more. The Health Science Center’s Counseling Services provides aid, support and counsel to students dealing with the complex personal, social and academic demands of medical school. 


Guidelines for Clinical Activities by Medical Students

Medical students rotate in the clinical setting to achieve competencies in all aspects of patient care to include the following: obtaining patient histories, performing thorough physical examinations, formulating differential diagnoses, learning to make decisions based on appropriate laboratory and radiological studies and procedures, interpreting results of special studies and treatment, communicating with patients on all aspects of disease and prognosis and collaborating with members of the health care team.

To this end, the medical student may participate in activities that include the following: 

  • Patient contact for obtaining a medical history, performing a physical exam, and following the inpatient and/or outpatient course 
  • Patient medical record review, including laboratory reports, x-ray reports, etc. 
  • Performance of appropriately supervised procedures as authorized by the patient’s attending physician. The student may perform procedures (such as venipuncture) for which the student is trained and deemed competent, without direct supervision. 
  • Performance of basic laboratory studies such as urinalysis, under appropriate supervision and review
  • Writing orders for specified patients based on student clinical preparedness and graduated responsibility. All of the orders written by a medical student must be reviewed and countersigned by the responsible resident or attending physician before forwarding to the nursing service. 
  • Writing patient progress notes in the medical chart which must be reviewed and countersigned by the responsible resident or attending physician

Medical students CANNOT write orders independently, without review and counter-signature by the responsible resident or attending physician. Medical students CANNOT give verbal orders. Medical students CANNOT be in the primary lines of communication in the critical value reporting process. Medical students CANNOT have primary responsibility for communication of vital patient related information to the patient or their family members.


Medical Student Duty Hours Policy 

Duty Hours Policy for Clinical Years

1. Students will have a limit of 80 duty hours per week, with in-hospital hours during call from home counted

2. In recognition that many rotations end on a Friday and there is a weekend off between rotations, the following are minimum days off on rotations, with the distribution of the scheduled days off at the discretion of the clerkship or course director: 

  • 1 day off on a 2 week rotation 
  • 3 days off on a 4 week rotation 
  • 5 days off on a 6 week rotation 
  • 7 days off for an 8 week rotation    
  • a day off is one full (24-hour) day 
  • a day absent counts as a day off 

3. Call will be scheduled no more than every third night 

4. There is a limit of 30-hours on continuous duty

5. There must be a 10-hour minimum rest between duty periods (this does not apply to night or weekend call) 

6. Students will be educated about fatigue and fatigue management 

7. Students may report duty hour violations to the 24/7/365 hour hotline: 1-800-500-0333. (All calls are treated confidentially and no self-identification is necessary) 

8. Clerkship directors and course directors are responsible for the enforcement of this policy 

Policy adopted by the Curriculum Committee August 2007 and appended in May 2013. 


Required Attire

During the preclinical curriculum, students spend most of their time in lectures, small group sessions, laboratories, or other activities that do not involve patient contact. At such times, students are expected to dress comfortably, but without detracting from attentiveness and learning. When patients are present, either in a clinical setting or in the classroom, students are expected to dress professionally and to wear the white jacket with the school logo and the required student badge. Module directors should be consulted about proper attire in specific circumstances.

In the clinical setting, students are expected to dress as health care professionals, wearing both the white jacket with the school logo and the required student badge. On clinical rotations footwear must be professional; open toe footwear is never appropriate because it does not offer adequate protection from biohazards. Clerkship and course directors should be consulted if there is a question about appropriate attire.

All students are required to wear the student badge at all times in a visible manner in all preclinical and clinical settings. 


Providers of Care to Medical Students

Purpose:

  • To assure that academic evaluation/progression are independent from confidential or protected health information.
  • To ensure that individuals charged with academic evaluation/progression base their decisions on agreed upon performance measures.
  • To assure that medical students can obtain and receive private and confidential medical care from the Student Health Center and/or psychological/psychiatric care from the Student Counseling Center, and that health care providers of sensitive medical or psychological/psychiatric care to medical students have no role in evaluation/progression of medical students through the academic curriculum.

Policy:

The SOM is committed to providing an educational environment that is supportive and respectful to its faculty, staff and students. This policy is established to ensure that students are evaluated based on common agreed upon performance measures that are independent of confidential or protected health information. This is essential to ensure that student academic performance is evaluated properly and to ensure that students are not discouraged from seeking medical and/or psychological/psychiatric care that is held in the strictest standards of patient privacy and confidentiality, without concern for consequent adverse actions or repercussions.

Students and health care providers should follow these procedures to make certain that the appropriate care is sought and provided.

Health care professionals who provide medical and/or psychological/psychiatric care to medical students must:

  • have no role in the formal academic or professionalism evaluation of medical students at the present or future time.
  • have no role in advancement/progression/graduation of medical students at the present or future time.
  • recuse himself/herself from the formal academic or professionalism evaluation of medical students and from academic or professionalism decisions of advancement/progression/graduation of medical students, if a dual relationship with medical students is anticipated or is discovered, and, when appropriate and without breaching confidentiality, alert a Dean for Student Affairs immediately.

Students should:

  • seek medical care through the Student Health Center (Room 1.422 Nursing Building). This medical care is usually provided by Registered Nurses or Advanced Nurse Practitioners under the supervision of the Student Health Center Medical Director. The health care providers in the Student Health Center may refer medical students to other academic or community health care providers for further/follow-up care.
  • seek psychological/psychiatric care through the Student Counseling Center (Room 101F Medical School). A multidisciplinary staff, who is not involved in academic or professionalism evaluation and/or decisions of advancement/progression through the curriculum, provides evaluation and short-term treatment including counseling, psychotherapy, and medication management when necessary to medical students with mental health, situational, social, or academic concerns. The health care providers in the Student Counseling Center may refer medical students to other academic or community health care providers for further/follow-up care.
  • inform staff in the Student Health Center and the Student Counseling Center that they are students at the SOM.

Student Employment

Because of the intensity of the medical curriculum, students are encouraged to refrain from outside employment during the academic year. Students who feel employment is essential are advised to consult with a Dean for Student Affairs before accepting employment offers. Some opportunities for employment are available for students in good academic standing such as tutoring through the Office of UME.


Student Governance

Class officers are responsible for the management of class activities and are the official class representatives in interaction with the administration of the SOM and Health Science Center. In addition to the usual slate of officers, two students from each class are elected as representatives to the Student Government Association.

Elections are held in the spring to choose officers and representatives for the next academic year. In the case of the first year class, elections occur in October. The Office of Student Affairs supervises elections.

Committees of the SOM and the Health Science Center (both standing and ad hoc) have student representation. Appointments to SOM committees are approved by the Deans in the Office of UME and those to Health Science Center committees by the Vice President for Academic, Faculty and Student Affairs upon recommendation from the Deans for Student Affairs. 

The following committees have student representation:

                SOM Committees:

  • Admissions 
  • Curriculum

                Health Science Center Committees:

  • Campus Health and Wellness 
  • Computing Resources
  • Infection Policy and Education
  • International Relations
  • Library
  • Parking & Traffic Safety 
  • Student Governance Association 
  • Student Health Advisory 

Organization of Student Representatives

The Organization of Student Representatives (OSR) is the organizational entity of the Association of American Medical Colleges which deals specifically with medical student issues. This is a national organization that addresses issues common to students from all medical schools. Individual input from each school is through the class representative to the OSR. That representative is selected through the Office of Student Affairs. The selection of each class representative will occur during the second semester of the first year. Each representative serves through the fourth year.


Medical Student Organizations

Medical Student Organizations must be approved by the Office of Student Affairs and managed by the Office of Student Life in Student Services. Contact the Office of Student Life for more information on the varied organizations in which students can participate.


Scholarships

Scholarship assistance may be available within the SOM. Scholarships are awarded based on need, merit, or a combination of both. The SOM determines the selection of scholarships based on criteria established by the donor. Scholarships may be renewable depending upon academic performance and/or stated scholarship conditions. 

The student will apply for scholarships online through the student portal. The student must have filed the Free Application for Federal Student Aid in order to be considered for scholarships. The SOM Scholarship Committee will make recommendations for selection of candidates for scholarships; these recommendations will be forwarded to the Office of Financial Aid and Veterans Affairs for processing to student accounts. If the student receives a scholarship, after he/she has been fully awarded, the Office of Financial Aid and Veterans Affairs may need to reduce other aid on the account in order to prevent an over-award of federal funds.


Dual Degree Programs

M.D./Ph.D.

The M.D./Ph.D. Program is under the supervision of the Deans of the SOM, the Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences (GSBS), the M.D./Ph.D. Advisory Committee, and the M.D./Ph.D. Steering Committee. The M.D./Ph.D. Advisory Committee, with representation from the SOM and GSBS, provides direction and oversight of all activities of the M.D./Ph.D. Program. The M.D./Ph.D. Steering Committee provides strategic planning and oversight of financial support of the M.D./Ph.D. Program. An independent M.D./Ph.D. Program Promotions Board reviews the progress of M.D./Ph.D. students every six months throughout medical and graduate school enrollment. Progression is assessed on the basis of academic performance, USMLE Step 1 and USMLE Step 2CK and CS scores, research rotation reports, research and scholarly activities, evaluations from the Supervising Professor, and student self-assessments. Recommendations from the M.D./Ph.D. Promotions Board are reviewed at the next monthly meeting of the M.D./Ph.D. Advisory Committee.

The M.D./Ph.D. Program expects students who are pursuing the dual degree to maintain standards of academic excellence, to progress in a timely fashion toward both M.D. and Ph.D. degrees, and to maintain professionalism. Students will be subject to the academic guidelines of both the SOM and the GSBS. However, they will be subject to additional requirements as specified by the M.D./Ph.D. program in order to remain members of that program.

Students in the M.D./Ph.D. Program must satisfactorily achieve milestones and criteria established by the M.D./Ph.D. Advisory Committee and the SPC policies. Failure to meet or achieve the established standards will result in denial of advancement and dismissal from the M.D./Ph.D. Program. A student's academic standing and ability to progress with respect to either the SOM or the GSBS is administered through the appropriate dean's office or their designees. M.D./Ph.D. students shall have the right to appeal a decision of dismissal from the program. The appeal will be heard by the M.D./Ph.D. Advisory Committee. Solely on procedural concerns can a student appeal to a higher institutional administration.

M.D./M.P.H.

The M.D./M.P.H. Program prepares physicians to treat individuals and populations via training in biostatistics, epidemiology, behavioral science, public policy, and environmental health. This program allows for students to attain the M.D. and the M.P.H. concurrently; however, students may decide to take five years to complete both degrees. Candidates must first be accepted to the SOM and then apply to the School of Public Health at the UT Health Science Center-Houston (UTSPH). If accepted into the dual degree program, students will begin coursework for the M.P.H. with online courses in the summer before starting medical school. The M.P.H. requires completion of 46 credit hours, some of which will be shared with the SOM credit hours.  To be a dual degree student and earn shared credits, you must begin your M.P.H. coursework by the Spring of your second year of medical school.

The UTSPH has a regional campus in San Antonio with full-time faculty. The campus is located less than one mile from the School of Medicine, with convenient parking. Classes are offered online and in person with instructors from San Antonio and via ITV with instructors from other SPH campuses. See the San Antonio campus website at: http://www.sph.uth.tmc.edu/Campuses/San-Antonio.

The M.D./M.P.H. Program expects students who are pursuing the dual degree to maintain standards of academic excellence, to progress in a timely fashion toward both the M.D. and M.P.H. degrees, and to maintain professionalism. Students will be subject to the academic guidelines of both the SOM and the UTSPH. Failure to meet or achieve the established standards will result in denial of advancement and dismissal from the M.D./ M.P.H. Program. A student's academic standing and ability to progress with respect to either the SOM or the UTSPH is administered through the appropriate dean's office or their designees. M.D./ M.P.H. students shall have the right to appeal a decision of dismissal from the program. The appeal will be heard by the M.D./ M.P.H. Program Advisory Committee. Solely on procedural concerns can a student appeal to a higher institutional administration.


M.D. Degrees with Distinction

M.D. Degree with Distinction in Research

The M.D. with Distinction in Research Program recognizes medical students who demonstrate a dedicated commitment to enriching their medical education with independent research while maintaining high academic standards during medical school. Students are strongly encouraged to consider applying for the distinction as soon as possible, as the distinction may support a competitive residency application. Requirements for achieving the distinction are designed to ensure objective evaluation of merit for the distinction:

  • Maintain a minimum GPA of 3.25 throughout medical school
  • Mentor must be a UTHSCSA faculty member
  • Complete at least one Medical Student Research Elective course (INTD 4210, 4211, or 4212)
  • Should complete an intent to apply form by September 1 of chronological third year
  • Present a poster at Medical Student Research Day during medical school
  • Document at least 640 hours of research activity during medical school
  • Produce and submit to the Medical Student Research Committee a scientific manuscript based on the student's research that is suitable for a peer-reviewed journal; ideally the manuscript should be submitted for publication prior to submitting an application for the distinction. Publication of a manuscript does not guarantee the distinction.

Students who wish to achieve the distinction MUST complete their application packet by September 1 of the chronological fourth year for inclusion of the distinction in the Medical Student Performance Evaluation that supports the residency application OR by December 1 of the chronological fourth year for acknowledgement on the diploma only. After the committee reviews all projects and capstone presentations are complete, the committee will determine the students who have achieved the distinction.

M.D. Degree with Distinction in Medical Education 

The M.D. with Distinction in Medical Education Program provides medical students with an opportunity to spend part of their medical school career participating in activities focused on different components of teaching and educational research. This program is designed to instruct and train medical students in multiple domains of medical education and to emphasize the educational duties that physicians have in all aspects of their work.  Students are strongly encouraged to consider applying for the distinction as soon as possible, as the distinction may support a competitive residency application. Requirements for achieving the distinction are designed to ensure objective evaluation of merit for the distinction:

  • Maintain a minimum GPA of 3.25 throughout medical school
  • Should complete an intent to apply form by September 1 of chronological third year
  • Create an advisory committee of three faculty members, one who assumes the role of primary advisor and two additional members who support the students’ scholarly interests
  • Complete at least one enrichment elective course focused on academic medicine
  • Present a poster at Medical Student Research Day during medical school
  • Document at least 500 hours of activity for the distinction during medical school
  • Complete an educational scholarly project which describes the development, delivery and evaluation/assessment of the teaching activity
  • Deliver a capstone presentation and prepare a reflective summary to the Distinction in Medical Education Review Committee and the student’s advisory committee
  • Produce and submit to the Distinction in Medical Education Review Committee a manuscript based on the student's teaching activity that is suitable for a peer-reviewed journal; ideally the manuscript should be submitted for publication prior to submitting an application for the distinction. Publication of a manuscript does not guarantee the distinction.

Students who wish to achieve the distinction MUST complete their application packet by September 1 of the chronological fourth year for inclusion of the distinction in the Medical Student Performance Evaluation that supports the residency application OR by December 1 of the chronological fourth year for acknowledgement on the diploma only. After the committee reviews all projects and capstone presentations are complete, the committee will determine the students who have achieved the distinction. 

M.D. Degree with Distinction in Medical Humanities

The M.D. with Distinction in Medical Humanities provides medical students with the opportunity to spend part of their medical school career exploring the interdisciplinary program offerings of the Center for Medical Humanities & Ethics (CMHE). Students in this program will ultimately be expected to produce a Capstone Project, which demonstrates a sustained work of academic research or sustainably fills a specific and substantial need for a selected community within one of the four tracks supported by the CMHE: 1) Community Service Learning, 2) Global Health, 3 )Arts & Humanities, and 4) Medical Ethics. We expect that the interprofessional nature of this distinction will expose students to novel career options while enabling them to develop a strong record in both academics and community outreach that will be well regarded by residency selection committees.

ANES Courses

ANES 4000. Special Topic. 4 Credit Hours.

This is a self-designed course created by both the student and the department to cover a specific topic. A Course Approval Form must be completed along with documentation of the designed course description.

ANES 4001. Clinical Anesthesiology. 4 Credit Hours.

Students are required to participate in Anesthesiology at one of the general hospitals affiliated with the Health Science Center with supervised, graded responsibility for anesthetic management during all phases of the peri-operative period. Objectives are to develop skills for physical assessment, choice of anesthetic management, administration of anesthesia, airway maintenance, and basic life support of the anesthetized patient.

ANES 4002. Critical Care. 4 Credit Hours.

Students are required to participate in the adult surgical intensive care unit at Audie Murphy VA Hospital. Emphasis will be placed on the diagnosis and treatment of all aspects of acute respiratory failure, especially that occurring in the postoperative state, including post-cardiac surgery. The principles of pulmonary, renal, cardiac, and nutritional support will be discussed. The ethics of life support are also discussed.

ANES 4003. Anesthesiology Research. 4 Credit Hours.

Research experiences are in either the clinical or basic sciences. Clinical research includes developing an understanding of clinical study design, procedures involved in the clinical study and data analysis. Studies are carried out largely in the operating room environment. Basic research can include studies of vascular control, studies on anesthetic agent interactions with the central nervous and cardiovascular systems, CNS ischemic or traumatic injury, and electrophysiologic monitoring and drug kinetics across the human maternal/fetal placental barrier.

ANES 4004. Obstetrical/Analgesia Mgmt. 4 Credit Hours.

Participation in Obstetric Anesthesiology at University Hospital, teaching will emphasize practical care with the student taking an active part in the monitoring of and assisting in the anesthetic care of healthy or complicated women in labor, as well as those undergoing cesarean section. Students will have the opportunity to perform intubations, epidurals, and spinals. Management of GYN outpatient anesthesia will also be included. Emergency resuscitation for hypotension, convulsions, aspiration, and respiratory cardiac arrest may be reviewed as well as prophylactic measures for the prevention of these conditions.

ANES 4005. Pain Management. 4 Credit Hours.

Students participate in the University Center for Pain Medicine at University Hospital. Students participate in the management of chronic pain patients using a multi-disciplinary approach. Students will be exposed to areas of pain management that include operative vs. non-operative options for chronic pain patients and physical therapy and mobilization techniques. Student's responsibilities include evaluating new patient with a focused and detailed physical exam, seeing follow up patients for medication management, and managing patient pre, during, and post procedures. The student is required to become proficient in accurately evaluating back pain, neuropathies, radiculopathies, and pain diseases including regional complex pain syndromes. This rotation is designed for any student; especially those interested in primary care, anesthesiology, orthopedics, neurology, neurosurgery, or has in interest in learning how to deal with patients with chronic pain.

ANES 4008. Cardiothoracic Anesthesia. 4 Credit Hours.

Students will be involved in care of the cardiothoracic patients at University Hospital. Emphasis will be on anesthesia for patients with cardiovascular and thoracic disease, cardiopulmonary physiology and pharmacology, and invasive hemodynamic monitoring. Students will work directly with one of the cardiothoracic faculty in the Anesthesiology Department.

ANES 4202. Clinical Anesthesiology-Harlingen. 4 Credit Hours.

Senior students function as "interns" under private practice anesthesiologists who are clinical faculty at the Regional Academic Health Center. They perform preoperative anesthetic assessment on surgical patients in the outpatient clinics, in the ICUs, and on the general wards. They develop appreciation for medical conditions that affect choice of anesthetic agent. They have the opportunity to develop expertise in local, regional, and general anesthesia management. They have the opportunity to develop expertise in airway management. They have the opportunity to become knowledgeable in induction and maintenance anesthetic agents. They have the opportunity to develop expertise in intraoperative monitoring techniques of the anesthetized patient. They follow patients in the recovery room and develop appreciation for complications that may occur in the intra- and post-operative period. They present cases, attend all conferences, and take call as designated by the service. They mentor third-year medical students on the designated service.

ANES 6081. Anesthesia Rotation. 1.5 Credit Hour.

Students rotate through the operating room and peri-operative patient areas of the hospital to evaluate patients undergoing general anesthesia and deep conscious sedation. Primary purposes of this clinical rotation are to allow the student to become comfortable with airway management and patient monitoring.

ANES 7000. Off Campus. 4 Credit Hours.

All off campus rotations must be approved by the designated faculty member prior to the beginning of the rotation (at least one week before the course begins). Credit will not be given for any rotation that has not been approved in advance. Required paperwork includes: "Course Approval" form, a written letter or email for acceptance form the physician preceptor with the start and end dates of the course/rotation, and a course description of your learning objectives and responsibilities during the rotation. Forms must include a complete address and telephone number for the off campus location or residence address for the student while at the off campus site. Forms will not be approved after the rotation has already begun. Contact the department for assistance with enrolling in this course.

BIOC Courses

BIOC 0003. Scientific Writing: Development and Defense of a Research Proposal. 2 Credit Hours.

The course consists of writing a progress report describing research results during the last year. The course is required of all graduate students beginning the first semester after selection of a supervising professor.

BIOC 4000. Special Topic. 4 Credit Hours.

This is a self-designed course created by both the student and the department to cover a specific topic. A Course Approval Form must be completed along with documentation of the designed course description.

BIOC 4001. Biochemistry Research. 4 Credit Hours.

This course is an opportunity to work in close collaboration with a member of the department on a problem in research of mutual interest. A sincere interest to acquire research experience or techniques, but no formal research training, is required.

BIOC 5013. Biochemistry. 3.5 Credit Hours.

Primarily lectures and conferences, this course is designed as a survey course for dental students. On a limited basis, a small number of graduate students may be accommodated. Content deals with the chemistry and metabolism of carbohydrates, amino acids, lipids, proteins, and nucleic acids. Special topics relating to the biochemistry of the oral cavity will be presented. The relationship between biochemistry and clinical aspects of dentistry is presented by clinical correlation speakers.

BIOC 5083. Hydrodynamic Methods. 2 Credit Hours.

This course is intended to provide students with the opportunity to gain a solid understanding of hydrodynamics and macromolecular transport processes, such as sedimentation and diffusion. The focus will be on hydrodynamic methods involving analytical ultracentrifugation and light scattering. Topics in sedimentation velocity, sedimentation equilibrium, buoyant density sedimentation, as well as static and dynamic light scattering and the complementarity of these approaches will be discussed. Macromolecular interactions involving mass action, concentration dependent nonideality, and reaction rates are covered. This course will also cover a range of data analysis approaches including the van Holde-Weischet method, the second moment method, direct boundary fitting by finite element modeling, the C(s) method, the 2-dimensional spectrum analysis, genetic algorithm optimization, nonlinear least squares fitting approaches to user-defined models. Statistical analysis using Monte Carlo and bootstrap methods also will be covered.

BIOC 5085. Biophysical Methods In Biology. 2 Credit Hours.

This course is required for all students enrolled in the Molecular Biophysics and Biochemistry track. The course covers modern biophysical methods for studying biological macromolecules in sufficient detail to understand the current literature. Topics to be covered include macromolecular structure determination by X-ray crystallography and NMR spectroscopy; absorbance, fluorescence, and EPR spectroscopy; circular dichroism; light scattering; mass spectrometry; and hydrodynamics, including diffusion, electrophoresis, sedimentation velocity, and sedimentation equilibrium.

BIOC 5087. Molecular Genetics And Biotechnology. 1 Credit Hour.

This course is required for all students enrolled in either Molecular Biophysics & Biochemistry Track. The objective of this course it to provide comprehensive treatment of approaches to experimental biochemistry and [biophysics rooted in genetics, recombinant DNA technology, and genomics.

BIOC 5091. Special Topics In Biochemistry: Hydrodynamic Methods. 1 Credit Hour.

This course is intended to provide students with the opportunity to gain a solid understanding of hydrodynamics and macromolecular transport processes, such as sedimentation and diffusion. The focus will be on hydrodynamic methods involving analytical ultracentrifugation and light scattering. Topics in sedimentation velocity, sedimentation equilibrium, buoyant density sedimentation, as well as static and dynamic light scattering and the complementarity of these approaches will be discussed. Macromolecular interactions involving mass action, concentration dependent nonideality, and reaction rates are covered. This course will also cover a range of data analysis approaches including the van Holde-Weischet method, the second moment method, direct boundary fitting by finite element modeling, the C(s) method, the 2-dimensional spectrum analysis, genetic algorithm optimization, nonlinear least squares fitting approaches to user-defined models. Statistical analysis using Monte Carlo and bootstrap methods also will be covered.

BIOC 5092. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy For Biochemists. 2 Credit Hours.

This course provides a working knowledge of the basic underlying theory of modern pulsed Nuclear Magnetic Resonance methods in the study of the structures and internal dynamics of biological macromolecules in solution. The theoretical concepts to be covered include an overview of pulse excitation, digital sampling, and Fourier transformation. The product operator formalism will be used to describe how modern multinuclear multidimensional pulse methods function to yield the desired signals. The practical concepts to be covered will include an overview of modern methods for obtaining sequential resonance assignments, determining high-resolution three-dimensional structures, and analyzing internal dynamics.

BIOC 5093. Data Analysis In Biochemistry And Biophysics. 1 Credit Hour.

This course is required for all students enrolled in either Molecular Biophysics & Biochemistry Track, or the Diabetes & Metabolic Disorders Track, and is open to all students enrolled in the Integrated Multidisciplinary Graduate Program. The course covers statistical and mathematical analysis of typical biochemical data. Topics to be discussed include: enzyme kinetics, first and second order chemical reactions, ligand binding, scintillation counting of radioactivity, UV-VIS difference and derivative spectra, analytical ultra-sedimentation, and solution of multiple simultaneous equations using matrix algebra. Emphasis is placed upon the use of computers to analyze experimental data using programs running under Windows, or Linux platforms. Students will also become familiar with file transfers between these two platforms and the use of VNC viewer to enable their PC computers to be used as a Linux terminal.

BIOC 6010. Gene Expression. 2 Credit Hours.

The course covers gene expression focusing on regulation at the levels of transcription, RNA processing, transport and stability, and translation. Proteins and other regulatory molecules involved in these processes will also be covered. Particular emphasis will be placed on transcriptional control mechanisms including: RNA polymerases, chromatin remodeling, methylation and other epigenetic modifications, families of transcription factors including their DNA binding properties, protein-protein interaction domains, trans-activation mechanisms, regulation by ligand binding, phosphorylation and other signaling mechanisms and nuclear-cytoplasmic transport; posttranscriptional mechanisms including: mechanisms of RNA splicing, nuclear-cytoplasmic transport of RNA, RNA localization and targeting, RNA stability; and translational control. Post-transcriptional and translational control mechanisms will highlight the roles of RNA binding proteins and their modifications in these processes. Prerequisite: INTD 5000.

BIOC 6015. Metabolic Disorders. 2 Credit Hours.

This course will present an introduction to dysfunctions in normal metabolic processes that lead to major human disorders and pathologies. Major topics to be covered include the causes and pathogenesis associated with Type 2 diabetes, obesity, and related hormonal signaling pathways. Other topics will focus on lipid and protein metabolic disorders, and on dysfunctions associated with mitochondrial and extracellular matrix defects.

BIOC 6029. MBB Journal Club and Student Research Presentations. 2 Credit Hours.

To be taken by all graduate students in the MBB track each semester starting with the second year. Students will each make one presentation per semester. Presentations will typically be of a recent journal article in the area of biochemistry or biophysics. Journal articles for presentations must be approved by the instructor. With permission, a student may present a summary of his or her doctoral research. In the Spring semester of their third year, students will present a review of literature relevant to their doctoral research. Grading will be based on both the presentation and involvement in class discussion.

BIOC 6035. Drug Design And Discovery. 2 Credit Hours.

This course covers state-of-the-art approaches to the discovery and design of drugs - from small molecules to peptides - as well as drug delivery vehicles, with a strong emphasis on structure-based approaches. Topics to be covered will include the following: high-throughput screening, fragment based drug discovery, protein:protein and protein:ligand interactions, use of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR),surface plasmon resonance (SPR) and fluorescent methods in drug discovery, virtual (in silico) screening, peptides and peptidomimetics, structure based drug design, and use of macromolecular assemblies as drug delivery vehicles and as targets for drug therapy. Prerequisites: INTD 5000.

BIOC 6036. Macromolecular Structure & Mechanism. 2 Credit Hours.

This course will cover the fundamentals of protein and nucleic acid structure and of enzyme catalysis. The course is required of students in the Molecular Biochemistry and Biophysics Track.Topics to be covered include: DNA and RNA structure, protein structure, protein folding, ligand binding by proteins, and enzyme catalysis.

BIOC 6037. Integration Of Metabolic Pathways. 2 Credit Hours.

The course is required of students in the Molecular Biophysics and Metabolic Pathways track. The objective is to provide an understanding of the individual reactions in intermediary metabolism and how the reactions are integrated by regulatory mechanisms. Topics include carbohydrate, lipid, and nitrogen metabolism and mechanisms of regulation of individual enzymes and metabolic pathways.

BIOC 6038. Surface Plasmon Resonance Workshop. 0.5 Credit Hours.

Surface plasmon resonance can be used to measure the equilibrium and rate constants of a variety of biomolecular interactions, including protein-protein, protein-small molecule, protein-nucleic acid and protein-phospholipid. In this laboratory intensive workshop, students will be exposed to the principles of experimental design, data collection, and data analysis utilizing state of the art instrumentation and model interactions.

BIOC 6069. Contemporary Biochemistry Student Review. 1 Credit Hour.

The course has two aspects. In the first, students will have the opportunity to put together a didactic lecture on a biochemical topic, essentially an oral review. Alternatively, students who attend a scientific meeting may pick a theme that was presented at that meeting in any of multiple venues (symposia, platform presentations, posters) and develop it as a presentation equivalent to an oral review. In each case, students will research the background of the material and present the latest findings. This is not intended to be a journal club but rather a didactic or teaching lecture. The course Director will work with the students ahead of time to assist them in preparing their presentation. The second aspect is that students who are not themselves presenting are required to attend the presentations. Biochemistry students must present at least once in years 3.5 of their matriculation in order to graduate with the Ph.D. degree. May be repeated for credit.

BIOC 6071. Supervised Teaching. 1-9 Credit Hours.

This course consists of teaching medical or dental biochemistry under close supervision of instructors. Management of small conference teaching groups as well as formal lecture presentations will be included.

BIOC 6097. Research. 1-12 Credit Hours.

This course consists of independent, original research under the direction of a faculty advisor.

BIOC 6098. Thesis. 1-12 Credit Hours.

Registration for a least one term is required of M.S. candidates.

BIOC 7099. Dissertation. 1-12 Credit Hours.

Registration for at least two terms is required for Ph.D. candidates.

CIRC Courses

CIRC 5001. Medicine, Behavior & Society Longitudinal Module. 6 Credit Hours.

The Medicine, Behavior, and Society module explores the areas of history, law, ethics, clinical, social and cultural contexts of medicine as well as human behavior & development over the lifespan (cognitive, social and emotional development from infancy to death.) The course will focus on global issues such as the health care system and on local issues such as the physician-patient relationship. Students will be introduced to communication skills, professionalism, research, and cultural competency.

CIRC 5003. Language of Medicine Longitudinal Module. 5.4 Credit Hours.

The Language of Medicine component of the curriculum serves as the common denominator necessary for students to be able to discuss systematic anatomy in the integrated modules to follow. Basic structure, conceptual anatomical principles and development of the human body presented. Knowledge is acquired in didactic sessions emphasizing clinical relevance, reinforced by practical application during laboratory application during laboratory sessions in which supervised cadaver dissection is performed by the students. Imaging techniques, prosections, demonstrations, and presentations by clinical specialists supplement the laboratory work.

CIRC 5005. Clinical Skills Longitudinal Module. 14.75 Credit Hours.

The Clinical Skills Longitudinal module threads throughout the entire first and second year curriculum. Using standardized and real patients, students learn medical history taking and physical examination techniques. In addition, through didactic sessions, simulations, small group sessions and labs, students master the knowledge, communication skills, professional, and interpersonal skills necessary for fostering positive doctor-patient relationships.

CIRC 5007. Fundamentals: Molecules to Medicine. 9 Credit Hours.

The Fundamentals: Molecules to Medicine module provides the foundation for subsequent courses and clinical practice. Through active, collaborative learning activities which may include, but are not limited to, laboratory, small group, and clinical case sessions the students gain a deeper understanding of the homeostatic structure of molecules, cells, and tissues. Students develop problem-solving skills in a multidisciplinary approach to human health and disease.

CIRC 5009. Attack and Defense. 9 Credit Hours.

The Attack and Defense module is an integrated and innovative look at microbiology, immunology, and infectious disease including public and international health issues. Students are prepared for clinical encounters requiring diagnosis, treatment, and preventive measures for immunological conditions and disorders and infectious diseases by fostering critical thinking skills. The learning environment promotes professional identity formation, effective communication and professionalism. Students acquire a broad understanding of normal and abnormal immune system function through active, collaborative leaning activities which may include, but are not limited to laboratory, small group, and clinical case sessions.

CIRC 5011. Circulation. 5 Credit Hours.

The Circulation module provides an integrated approach to the basic and clinical science concepts related to the cardiovascular and hematopoietic systems. Students acquire a broad understanding of normal structure and function of the cardiovascular and hematopoietic systems including the cardiac cycle, cardiovascular pressures and flows, nutrients and oxygen delivery, hematopoiesis, and the hemostasis system through active, collaborative learning activities which may include, but are not limited to, laboratory, small group, and clinical case sessions. A comprehensive, multidisciplinary overview of the pathophysiology, epidemiology, biostatistics, interpretation of diagnostic tests, and pharmacotherapeutic and other therapeutic principles related to cardiovascular and hematopoietic disorders is included.

CIRC 5013. Respiratory Health. 4 Credit Hours.

The Respiratory Health module integrates basic science and clinical concepts related to respiratory health disease. A comprehensive study is conducted of the normal structure and function, pathophysiology/pathology, clinical manifestations, and interpretation of diagnostic tests for respiratory diseases. The student is immersed in a multidisciplinary study of pharmacotherapeutic approaches to treatment, interventional therapies, the use of evidence-based medicine and research, epidemiology, and prevention in the field of respiratory health. Students acquire a broad understanding of normal and abnormal respiratory system function through active, collaborative learning activities which may include, but are not limited to laboratory, small group, and clinical case sessions.

CIRC 5015. Renal and Male Reproductive. 5 Credit Hours.

The Renal and Male Reproductive module is a comprehensive overview of the structural and urologic components of the renal and the male reproductive system. Students gain a deeper understanding of glomerular and tubular function and pathology, as well as acute and chronic kidney injury and also benefit from a multidisciplinary approach represented by adult and pediatrics, and biochemistry. A broad understanding of normal and abnormal renal and male reproductive system function is achieved through active, collaborative learning activities that may include, but are not limited to laboratory, small group, and clinical case sessions.

CIRC 5017. Hematology. 3 Credit Hours.

The goal of this course is to expose students to the pathogenesis and pathophysiology of disease and disorders as they pertain to the specialty of hematology. During the module, the first year medical students will come to appreciate the basic science foundation for the clinical practice of Hematology. Students will gain an understanding of the medical non-medical factors that effect the hematology system.

CIRC 6001. Medicine, Behavior & Society Longitudinal Module. 6 Credit Hours.

The Medicine, Behavior, and Society module explores the areas of history, law, ethics, clinical, social and cultural contexts of medicine as well as human behavior & development over the lifespan (cognitive, social and emotional development from infancy to death.) The course will focus on global issues such as the health care system and on local issues such as the physician-patient relationship. Students will be introduced to communication skills, professionalism, research, and cultural competency.

CIRC 6005. Clinical Skills Longitudinal Module. 14.75 Credit Hours.

The Clinical Skills Longitudinal module threads throughout the entire first and second year curriculum. Using standardized and real patients, students learn medical history taking and physical examination techniques. In addition, through didactic sessions, simulations, small group sessions and labs, students master the knowledge, communication skills, professional, and interpersonal skills necessary for fostering positive doctor-patient relationships.

CIRC 6007. Mind, Brain and Behavior. 9 Credit Hours.

Mind, Brain, and Behavior module provides a comprehensive introduction to the normal anatomy, development, physiology and radiological features of the human nervous system and its pathologic disorders. Through active learning methods, students will practice clinical assessment of the nervous system while learning the major features of common neurological, neurosurgical, psychiatric and psychological disorders and pharmacological approach for the nature of the experience of the brain. The student will gain an appreciation for the nature of the experience of having an illness affecting the brain and mind, and a deepened compassion for patients with these illnesses.

CIRC 6009. Endocrine & Female Reproductive. 7 Credit Hours.

The Endocrine- Reproductive module provides an integrated, comprehensive study of the normal structure and function of the endocrine and reproductive systems as well as the clinical manifestations of endocrine and reproductive disorders. Innovative, active learning methods which may include, but are not limited to laboratory, small group, and clinical case sessions allow students to develop critical thinking skills and gain a deeper understanding of the role of the endocrine system in regulation of metabolic activity, water and electrolyte balance, the endocrinology of the menstrual cycle, pregnancy, as well as human reproduction. The students benefit from a multidisciplinary approach incorporating the study of pharmacotherapeutic modalities, evidence based medicine, as well as current clinical/translational research applications into the endocrinology/reproductive medicine curriculum.

CIRC 6011. Digestive Health and Nutrition. 7 Credit Hours.

The Digestive Health and Nutrition module provides an integrated overview of the basic science and clinical concepts related to digestive health and nutrition. Through innovative learning methods that may include, but are not limited to laboratory, small group, and clinical case sessions, students gain a deeper understanding of the normal structure and function of the digestive system, as well as pathophysiology/pathology, clinical manifestations and interpretation of diagnostic tests as they relate to digestive health and nutrition. This comprehensive, multidisciplinary study includes pharmacotherapeutic approaches to treatment, interventional therapies, psychosocial aspects of digestive disease, the use of evidence-based medicine and research, epidemiology, and prevention in the field of digestive health and nutrition.

CIRC 6013. Form & Function: Skin, Muscles & Bones. 7.5 Credit Hours.

The Musculoskeletal and Dermatology module provides a comprehensive study of the development, structure, and function of the musculoskeletal and integumentary systems. Students acquire a broad understanding of normal and abnormal musculoskeletal and dermatologic function through active, collaborative learning during laboratory, small group, and clinical case sessions. Diagnostic and therapeutic techniques in the management of musculoskeletal and dermatologic disorders are discussed.

CSBL Courses

CSBL 3005. Advanced Anatomy. Credit Hours.

Selected students will participate in lectures, detailed dissections, presentations, and teaching of Pre-Matriculation students in the gross anatomy laboratory .A special project or readings in the surgical anatomy literature will be assigned. This elective is considered to be a full-time commitment (40 hours per week). Students are expected to 1) attend all lectures given in the Pre-Matriculation program, 2) to teach in all scheduled laboratory sessions, 3) to prepare and present prosections, 4) to help prepare a laboratory examination, 5) to write and present a literature review on an original topic of interest to the student related to the region of the body being studied.

CSBL 4000. Special Topic. 4 Credit Hours.

This is a self-designed course created by both the student and the department to cover a specific topic. A Course Approval Form must be completed along with documentation of the designed course description.

CSBL 4001. Anatomy of the Newborn. 4 Credit Hours.

Detailed gross dissection and study of newborn specimen with special emphasis on developmental origins as well as features and relationships differing from the adult; combined with library study of developmental malformations. Course fees: Lab fee $30.

CSBL 4002. Regional Anatomy. 4 Credit Hours.

Anatomy associated with one of the usual medical or surgical specialties, such as gastroenterology, neurology, orthopedics, obstetrics and gynecology, etc. Activities include detailed dissection, presentation of dissected material, assigned readings, and individual project. Course fees: Lab fee $ 30.

CSBL 4004. Selected Research Project. 4 Credit Hours.

Individual research projects to be arranged between the student and faculty members with whom he/she wishes to work.

CSBL 4005. Advanced Anatomy. 4 Credit Hours.

Selected students are required to participate in lectures, detailed dissections, presentations of prosected material, and teaching in the first year medical gross anatomy laboratory. Special projects, activities, and assigned readings in the surgical anatomy and history of anatomy literature. Course fees: Lab fee $30.

CSBL 4017. Advanced Neuroanatomy. 4 Credit Hours.

Selected students will be assigned a special project and readings in the neuro anatomical literature. Course Fees: Lab fee $30.

CSBL 4024. History of Anatomy In Situ: Reawakening & Development of Anatomy in the 14th - 18th Century Italy. 4 Credit Hours.

An in-depth study of the awakening and development of anatomy in 14th - 18th century Italy, visiting the sites where this occurred in Padua, Bologna, and Florence. The course consists of one week of didactic lectures and discussion prior to two weeks in Italy visiting anatomical museums and two of the oldest universities in the world, and ending with a week of student presentations based on a paper focusing on a historical, social, or scientific issue arising during this period in the Italian medical schools and currently relevant to the students' chosen field of medicine.

CSBL 4025. Anatomy Mentored Teaching. 4 Credit Hours.

The Mentored Teaching Elective allows 3rd and 4th year medical students to serve as teaching assistants for the spring CSBL 5022 Inter-professional Human Gross Anatomy course. CSBL 5022 serves students in the occupational therapy, physical therapy, physician assistant and biomedical engineering programs, and students in the Masters of Anatomy graduate program. Teaching assistants will serve as instructors for laboratory dissections which cover the central and peripheral nervous systems, vertebral column and back, the upper and lower limbs, head and neck, body wall, thorax, abdomen, pelvis, and perineum. Other teaching assistant duties include preparation of prosection specimens for teaching and demonstration, lab practical exam setup and grading, and preparation and presentation of a brief topical review relevant to anatomy. Applicants should have attained a minimum grade of B in Language of Medicine and in Musculoskeletal/Dermatology and exhibit the highest standards of professionalism. Enrollment is by permission of the Undergraduate Medical Education Office and by the course directors.

CSBL 5007. Methods In Cell Biology. 1 Credit Hour.

Through a combination of lectures and demonstrations, the instructors will introduce students to techniques which are currently being used in cellular biology laboratories. The emphasis will be on the applications themselves, their uses, limitations, and the necessary controls. The following topic areas will be covered: imaging and microscopy, immunological techniques, bioinformatics (DNA and protein), rodent anatomy and histology, cytogenetics, and in vitro cell growth and transfection.

CSBL 5012. Physician Assistant Gross Anatomy. 5 Credit Hours.

This course will cover the basic principles of human anatomy. Lectures are correlated with laboratory sessions in which students will learn human gross anatomy of the adult through the study of cadaver prosections, bones, models, atlas drawings and radiographs. Emphasis will be placed on basic systems anatomy as they apply to the physician's assistant. Course Fees: Gross Anatomy fee $30.00.

CSBL 5013. Gross Anatomy. 6 Credit Hours.

This course will teach structural and functional anatomy of the normal human body. Lectures will serve as introductory information for the laboratory dissections to follow and to clarify the interactions of the various anatomical components to accomplish the function of the body. The course will cover the central and peripheral nervous systems, vertebral column and back, head and neck, body wall, thorax, abdomen, pelvis, and perineum, and the upper and lower limbs. Special emphasis will be placed on the laboratory experience in which the learner will perform a detailed dissection of the entire human body in order to achieve an understanding of the three-dimensional relationships and thus the interactive function of the body. These dissections will be supplemented by the study of prosecuted specimens, models skeletons, and other demonstration materials. Course fees: Lab fee $30 Human Materials fee $865.

CSBL 5015. History Of Anatomy. 2.5 Credit Hours.

The history of anatomy course is designed to acquaint medical, dental, and graduate students with the history of medicine and especially with the physicians and scientists who made essential discoveries in human anatomy. Using a biographical approach, the course is presented as a seminar with lectures, assigned readings and student presentations.

CSBL 5016. Dental Gross Anatomy. 6 Credit Hours.

The focus of this course is the structure of the human body, with emphasis on the functional anatomy of the trunk, neck, head, and nervous system. Regional dissection of a human cadaver, by groups of students, is supplemented by individual study of prosections, models, skeletons, and other demonstration materials and is guided by lectures, conferences, and films. The first part of the course, which deals with the anatomy of the thorax and abdomen, presents a general overview of the functional architecture of most major body systems. The emphasis is on principles of structure, to allow development of a holistic understanding of human biology, both normal and pathological. The latter half of the course is devoted to study of the head and neck; greater emphasis will be placed on anatomical relationships with obvious reference to clinical dentistry. Course Fees: Human materials fee: $865 Lab fee: $30.

CSBL 5019. Gross Human Anatomy For Graduate Students. 6 Credit Hours.

This course will teach structural and functional anatomy of the normal human body. Lectures will serve as introductory information for the laboratory dissections to follow and to clarify the interactions of the various anatomical components to accomplish the function of the body. The course will cover the central and peripheral nervous systems, vertebral column and back, head and neck, body wall, thorax, abdomen, pelvis and perineum, and the upper and lower limbs. Special emphasis will be placed on the laboratory experience in which the learner will perform a detailed dissection of the entire human body in order to achieve an understanding of the three-dimensional relationships and thus the interactive function of the body. These dissections will be supplemented by the study of prosected specimens, models skeletons, and other demonstration materials. Permission of course director if required to enroll. Course fees: Human materials fee $ 865 Lab fee $30.

CSBL 5020. Dental Neuroscience. 1.5 Credit Hour.

This course will present the student with the basics of neuroanatomy underlying somatosensory perception, special senses, orofacial reflexes, and common neurological disorders. The emphasis will be on neuroanatomical pathways relevant to the head and neck, especially those mediated by the trigeminal system. The course also will include consideration of motor pathways and the special senses, disorders of which will necessarily influence treatment plans developed by future dental practitioners. Acquisition of a basic understanding of the neuroanatomical pathways discussed in lectures will be reinforced by laboratory sessions with representative images of brain and spinal cord sections.

CSBL 5022. Inter-professional Human Gross Anatomy. 5.5 Credit Hours.

This courses will teach structural and functional anatomy of the normal human body. Lectures will serve as introductory information for the laboratory dissections to follow and to clarify the interactions of the various anatomical components to accomplish the function of the body. The course will cover the central and peripheral nervous systems, vertebral column and back, the upper and lower limbs, head and neck, body wall, thorax, abdomen, pelvis, and perineum. Special emphasis will be placed on the laboratory experience in which the learner will perform a detailed dissection of the entire human body in order to achieve an understanding of the three-dimensional relationships and thus the interactive function of the body. The dissections will allow the student to understand the anatomical basis for disease and dysfunction in organ systems and their applications to clinical practice. They will be supplemented by the study of prosected specimens where possible, models skeletons, and other demonstration materials.

CSBL 5023. Development. 1 Credit Hour.

The course provides a survey of concepts in developmental biology (induction, cell-cell interactions, morphogen gradients, morphogenetic movements, transcription regulation, organogenesis) using experimental examples from both invertebrate and vertebrate embryos. The first set of lectures will focus on gametogenesis, fertilization, and early developmental events, such as cleavage, midblastula transition, gastrulation, and axis formation. The second set of lectures will explore the fates of germ layers in the contexts of cell type-specific differentiation and cell-cell interactions during organogenesis.

CSBL 5024. Genomics. 1 Credit Hour.

This course covers historical aspects of the Genomic project and high throughput methods (microarray, SAGE, proteomics, etc.) to perform global analysis of gene expression; the course also provides an overview of new biological fields such as systems biology, functional genomics, and comparative genomics. The students will have the opportunity to become familiarized with tools, methods, databases, and approaches used to extract biological information from global analyses. Hands-on training on biological databases and classes covering examples of the use of genomics to answer questions related to cancer and diseases is an important part of the course, helping the students to visualize how genomics can be used in their own research projects.

CSBL 5025. Genetics. 1 Credit Hour.

This course is designed to provide an overview of genetic research. Topics to be covered include: cytogenetics, mitochondrial genetics, cancer genetics, linkage analysis, complex traits, population genetics, animal models, sex determination, and epigenetics.

CSBL 5026. Stem Cell Biology. 1 Credit Hour.

This course is an up-to-date overview on current topics in stem cell biology. It is intended for the (future) basic scientist who is interested in studying the regulatory mechanisms of stem cells as well as for the (future) clinician who is interested in how stem cell biology will continue to impact patient care. Topics that will be discussed are: (1) basic biology and stem cells, including embryonic stem cells, adult stem cells, stem cells in different tissues and model systems; (2) microenvironment-mediated; (3) epigenetic regulators of stem cells; (4) stem cells in medicine, including regenerative medicine, cancer and aging; and (5) ethics.

CSBL 5032. Dental Histology. 5 Credit Hours.

Through lectures, demonstrations, and laboratory work, students in this course will be given the opportunity to study the microscopic structure of the basic tissues and organs of the human body, followed by details of the embryologic development and microscopic structure of the various organs of the oral cavity. Current concepts in cellular biology are presented during the portion of the course in which they are most relevant. The general purpose of this course is to give students the opportunity to become acquainted with the basic embryology, cytology, and histology of normal human tissues and organs, thereby providing a foundation of knowledge for the understanding of normal activity and disease processes. Course Fees: Included in general lab fee. $48 microscope fee for the Freshman year includes this course.

CSBL 5033. Brain Health Journal Club. 1 Credit Hour.

A journal club with an emphasis on brain health. The scope of the journal club is broad, with topics ranging from molecular mechanisms to the impact of injuries on behavior. Brain injuries ranging from stroke, spinal cord injury and traumatic brain injury (TBI) to age-associated neurodegeneration will be emphasized. Scientific articles on relevant or state-of-the-art techniques will also be encouraged. On a rotating basis, participants will be expected to present to the group either a paper of interest and relevance to their work or an update on their ongoing research or some combination of the two. PowerPoint slides are discouraged in favor of a chalk talk when presenting to the group.

CSBL 5074. Introduction to Research. 0.5 Credit Hours.

This course is required of all MS students in the Anatomy Track in Cellular & Structural Biology and is available to the Biotechnology Track students. Students will have the opportunity to learn about the research interests of faculty in the program. This course will introduce students to the research strategies and help them identify a mentor and committee members.

CSBL 5077. Scientific Writing. 2 Credit Hours.

This course will provide students with the opportunity to develop skills in scientific writing and the presentation of research results. It will emphasize learning-by-doing-and-re-doing. Students will be required to write something every week. The capstone project for students will be to write a grant proposal and defend it in front of the class. One hour per week will be devoted to lecture and critique of published work; the other hour will consist of critique and revision of student writing by other students, as well as by the course director. Topics to be covered include: (1) fundamentals of writing clearly, (2) principles of revision, (3) effective presentation of data, (4) fundamentals of oral presentation, (5) writing/presenting to the appropriate audience, (6) how to write background/introductory sections, (7) how to write materials and methods, (8) how to write the discussion section, and (9) how to constructively critique one's own and others writing.

CSBL 5083. Practical Optical Microscopy. 1 Credit Hour.

This course will be a one-hour elective for graduate students consisting of eight (8) one-hour lectures plus eight (8) one-hour laboratories. The course focuses on the practical aspects of using optical microscopes. The objectives are to teach students the fundamental principles of optical microscopy and to provide them with hands-on experience using the optical instrumentation in the Institutional Imaging Core.

CSBL 5089. Graduate Colloquium. 2 Credit Hours.

This course is designed to provide graduate students with training in evaluating the scientific literature and in presentation of research in a seminar or journal club format. The course will focus on critical thinking, including evaluation of existing literature, interpretation of experimental results, and comparison of alternative models and interpretations. These tools are essential both for oral presentations and for writing grant proposals and manuscripts. Emphasis will be placed on evaluation of the science, organization of the manuscript, and on oral presentation skills.

CSBL 5091. Special Topics. 1-9 Credit Hours.

No description available.

CSBL 5095. Experimental Design And Data Analysis. 3 Credit Hours.

The purpose of the course is to provide an introduction to experimental design and statistical analysis. The emphasis of the course will be on the selection and application of proper tests of statistical significance. Practical experience will be provided in the use of both parametric and nonparametric methods of statistical evaluation. Among the topics to be covered are: data reduction, types of distributions, hypothesis testing, scales of measurement, chi square analysis, the special case of the comparison of two groups; analysis of variance; a posteriori multiple comparisons tests, tests of the assumptions of parametric analyses, advanced forms of the analysis of variance, linear regression, and correlation analysis. This course involves the use of statistical software; therefore, access to a laptop or a computer with web access for classes and examinations is required.

CSBL 6015. Selective Topics In Oncology: Gynecological Cancers. 2 Credit Hours.

This advanced elective course for the Cancer Biology Track provides a unique learning experience intended to prepare students in the emerging research areas of gynecological cancers for designing research experiments using pre-clinical and clinical research materials. The entire course comprises a small-group format in which students interact closely with a group of faculty who has active research or clinical programs focusing on molecular, clinical, and therapeutic areas of gynecological cancers.

CSBL 6021. Animal Models. 3 Credit Hours.

The relevant biology, applicability, and practical use of a number of animal models to biomedical research is covered. Invertebrate (e.g., C. elegans) and vertebrate (e.g., fish and rodents) model systems are included in the course. Strengths and weaknesses of each organism that render them particularly valuable as animal models are emphasized. Experimental approaches and tools that are utilized in conjunction with each animal model are rigorously examined. The course is taught from primary scientific literature using classic historical publications and recent publications.

CSBL 6040. Gross Anatomy Mentored Teach. 1 Credit Hour.

The Gross Anatomy Mentored Teaching Elective allow students in the Integrated Biomedical Sciences Program, School of Health Professions, and other qualified students to serve as preceptors for the spring CSBL 5022 Interprofessional Human Gross Anatomy course. CSBL 5022 serves students in the occupational therapy, physical therapy, physician assistant and biomedical engineering programs, and students in the Masters of Anatomy graduate program. Preceptors will serve as instructors for laboratory dissections which cover the central and peripheral nervous systems, vertebral column and back, the upper and lower limbs, head and neck, body wall, thorax, abdomen, pelvis, and perineum. Other preceptor duties include preparation of prosection specimens for teaching and demonstration, lab practical exam setup and grading, and preparation and presentation of a brief topical review relevant to anatomy. Students enrolling in this elective must have taken an approved human gross anatomy course (as determined and agreed upon by the course directors) with a minimum final grade of B within the previous five years.

CSBL 6048. Biology of Aging. 4 Credit Hours.

Biology of Aging is the core course of the Biology of Aging Track. The course consists of two modules: Aging and Longevity Mechanisms and Molecular and Cellular Mechanisms of Aging. The purpose of this course is to provide students with the most up-to-date information on the current understanding of the aging process. This advanced interdisciplinary graduate course provides experimental understanding of the interrelated areas of aging and age-related diseases. Faculty from several departments will be involved in teaching this course, which will cover the molecular and cell biology of aging, model systems used for aging studies, age-related changes in organs and tissues, and age-related diseases.

CSBL 6049. Cellular and Molecular Mechanisms of Aging. 2 Credit Hours.

This course provides up-to-date information on the current understanding of cellular and molecular mechanisms that contribute to aging. The focus is on investigation of specific mechanisms of aging including oxidative stress, nutrient sensing signaling pathways, stem cells and senescence, and genome stability. Experimental design and analysis, including pros and cons of approaches used to gain knowledge and how to appropriately interpret data, will be discussed throughout the course. The relationship between age-related changes in function and potential contributions age associated diseases will be examined via recently published research.

CSBL 6050. Aging and Longevity Mechanisms. 2 Credit Hours.

This module will focus on and evaluate several approaches used to modulate longevity and how these are used to discover the genetic, physiological and intracellular foundation of aging processes. The course will consist of interactive lectures complemented by guided reading of currently research papers. Students will be taught to hone critical reading skills and develop testable hypotheses to carry research forward. Topics will include: Genetics of Aging, Exceptional Longevity, Pharmacological Interventions, Calorie Restriction, Healthspan and Pathology of Aging.

CSBL 6058. Neurobiology Of Aging. 2 Credit Hours.

The nervous systems of many species, including humans, show obvious declines in function as a result of increasing age. In addition to the gradual decline observed in neural function, it is clear that increasing age also results in increased susceptibility of the nervous system to degenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's Disease, Parkinson's Disease, and Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis. This course will focus on recent findings and topics related to the underlying pathology of aging in the nervous system and the relationship of aging to neurodegenerative disease.

CSBL 6059. Stem Cells & Regenerative Medicine. 1 Credit Hour.

The fields of stem cells and regenerative medicine are rapidly evolving and have great potential to change the way medicine is practiced. This course will encompass topics from basics of tissue specific stem cell biology to pre-clinical animal models, strategies and progress in regenerative medicine. We will discuss some of the most current research being done in regenerative medicine from stem cell transplantation to biomaterials. Prerequisite: INTD 5000.

CSBL 6060. Anatomical Sciences Thesis. 1-4 Credit Hours.

Designed as an alternative to a "bench research"- based thesis, this longitudinal course for the Anatomical Sciences track in the Masters Program will culminate in the production of a thesis ideally suitable for adaption as a scholarly publication in a peer-reviewed journal. The thesis should focus on assessment of an unanswered and important question on a relevant and approved subject, involve in-depth research and demonstrate critical thinking on the part of the student. A student in the Anatomical Sciences Track will meet with the Course Director during the spring semester of his/her first year in the program to begin to identify a research area and specific topic(s) for his/her thesis proposal. Areas of focus include (but are not limited to) the following: 1) Clinical Anatomy - anatomy related to medical procedures and/or training of health professionals; 2) Anatomical Variations - comparative research utilizing human cadavers in the gross anatomy laboratories or comparative research in animal models; 3) Anatomical Sciences Education - education research on anatomy teaching methods and approaches to teaching anatomy to health professions students;4) History of Anatomy - research on the development of human anatomical studies, comparative anatomy concepts, anatomy education, or involving other applications of the humanities to anatomical sciences (e.g. medical illustration, literature, music); 5) Human and rodent micro-anatomy /histology; or 6) Anatomical aspects of a biomedical research endeavor.

CSBL 6064. Genes & Development. 4 Credit Hours.

Genes and Development is the core course of the Genetics, Genomics, and Development Track. The course consists of four modules: genetics, genomics, developmental biology, and stem cell biology. Basic concepts in genetics such as cytogenetics, mitochondrial genetics, cancer genetics, linkage analysis, complex traits, population genetics, animal models, sex determination, and epigenetics will be presented. The genomics section will include historical aspects of the genome project and high throughput analysis. The students are introduced to new techniques in global analysis as well as have hands-on experience. The developmental biology section provides a survey of concepts in developmental biology (induction, cell-cell interactions, morphogen gradients, morphogenetic movements, transcriptional regulation, organogenesis) using experimental examples from both invertebrate and vertebrate embryos. The stem cell biology section includes the following topics: basic biology of stem cells, including embryonic stem cells, adult stem cells, stem cells in different tissues and model systems; microenvironment-mediated and epigenetic regulators of stem cells; stem cells in medicine, including regenerative medicine, cancer, and aging; and ethics. Required for the Genetics, Genomics & Development Track.

CSBL 6068. Cancer Biology Core 1. 2 Credit Hours.

This course reviews select topics in molecular and cellular biology of importance to molecular oncology. Topics examined include oncogenes, tumor suppressor genes, apoptosis, control of cell cycle regulation, and control of cellular growth and proliferation. The goal of the course is to prepare graduate students to critically evaluate published research in molecular oncology. Required for Cancer Biology Track.

CSBL 6069. Cancer Biology Core 2. 2 Credit Hours.

This course is designed to provide an overview of the molecular alterations identified in the most common cancer types in humans. The general guidelines on recent diagnosis and therapeutic advances in oncology will be presented. In addition, it will offer an overview on special populations affected by cancers or by less frequent but biologically informative cancers and basic concepts related to experimental tools relevant to cancer biology, including mouse models of tumors and molecular profiling. The conceptual notions on clinical trials of cancer drugs and the process of development of novel therapeutic drugs in cancer will be discussed. Required for Cancer Biology Track. Prerequisites: Cancer Biology Core 1.

CSBL 6070. Cancer Biology Preceptorial. 0.5 Credit Hours.

This is a discussion-based course to help unify our cancer biology students. The idea is to work in a small team based manner for students to disseminate knowledge that they are obtaining by participating in advanced courses of different topics by presenting the topic, methods and relevance to cancer biology to their peers. The intent is that participating students will discuss the topic in detail to understand how it might be useful to cancer biology research, in effect an active learning process. The goal is to provide an integrated multidisciplinary view on cancer research. Prerequisites: CSBL 6068 and CSBL 6069.

CSBL 6071. Supervised Teaching. 1-12 Credit Hours.

This course consists of participation in the teaching program of the first-year medical, dental, or health professions curriculum. Semester hours vary depending on the time spent in teaching.

CSBL 6072. Presentation Skills. 0.5 Credit Hours.

This course is designed to provide graduate students in the CSB masters program the opportunity to develop their skills in oral presentation. The course will focus on critical thinking, clear and concise presentation of research endeavors, and communicating science to the public, to students, and to other scientists. The course will meet for 1 hour every other week and is intended for MS students in their second year of study. Part I (Fall Semester) will focus on general scientific presentation skills.

CSBL 6073. Selective Topics In Oncology: Gynecological Cancers. 2 Credit Hours.

This is an advanced elective course for the Cancer Biology Track. The course is a unique learning experience in preparing students in the emerging research areas of gynecological cancers for designing research experiments using preclinical and clinical research materials. The entire course is a small-group format in which student interact closely with a group of faculty who have active research or clinical programs focusing on molecular, clinical, and therapeutic areas of gynecological cancers.

CSBL 6074. Molecular Aspects Of Epigenetics. 2 Credit Hours.

The purpose of this course is to develop an understanding of the molecular aspects of epigenetics. This advanced course will be a unique learning experience that prepares the student to evaluate and design new research in the areas of epigenetic processes including imprinting, gene slicing, X chromosome inactivation, position effect, reprogramming, and the process of tumorigenesis. This module concerns epigenetic mechanisms. Topics include: DNA methylation, histone modifications, epigenetics and stem cells, cancer epigenetics, RNA interference and epigenetics, bioinformatics and epigenetics, and translational epigenetics. This course will include a didactic program and student discussion. For the student discussion module, faculty and students will jointly discuss key publications that serve to bridge the gap between the student's prior understanding of the field and the state of the art in that area.

CSBL 6090. Seminar. 1-9 Credit Hours.

Attendance and participation in the regularly scheduled department seminar series is required each semester the course is offered. The activities included in the seminar course are attendance at invited seminars, journal club, and the student presentations including student annual progress and final dissertation and thesis presentations.

CSBL 6094. Advanced Neuroanatomy. 0.5 Credit Hours.

This course in neuroanatomy is offered to graduate students seeking to advance their knowledge beyond the fundamental level. The course consists of reading from more advanced texts and current anatomical literature as well as dissection of deep white matter tracts within the cortex. The student must also complete a 20-page paper on a neuroanatomical topic.

CSBL 6095. Functional Genomic Data Analysis. 2 Credit Hours.

This course covers basics of genomic data analysis. Focus is on general computational methods, their biomedical basis, and how to evaluate analysis results. Qualitative algorithm descriptions are expected. Prerequisites: CSBL 5095 or Equivalent.

CSBL 6097. Research. 1-12 Credit Hours.

This course consists of independent, original research under the direction of a faculty advisor.

CSBL 6098. Thesis. 1-12 Credit Hours.

This course consists of instruction in the preparation of the thesis. Registration for at least one term is required of M.S. candidates. Admission to candidacy for Master of Science degree is required.

CSBL 6165. Medical Genetics. 3 Credit Hours.

This course provides an introduction to the basic concepts of medical genetics and current areas of medical genetic research. The course reviews basic genetic concepts including the principles of Mendelian and nontraditional inheritance, cytogenetics, molecular genetics, quantitative and population genetics, and discuss important medical aspects of genetic counseling and pedigree analysis, dysmorphology, cancer genetics and counseling for inherited cancers, developmental genetics, prenatal diagnosis, newborn screening, and pharmacogenetics. Diagnosis and current research toward treatment and cure of common genetic disorders affecting metabolism, reproduction, the endocrine system, the functioning of the eye and the nervous system are discussed. An important aspect of the course will be a discussion of ethical issues in medical genetics. A basic background in genetics, cell biology, and biochemistry is assumed. Prerequisites: A basic background in genetics, cell biology, and biochemistry.

CSBL 7014. Anatomy 1. 5 Credit Hours.

This course provides the basic principles of human anatomy. Students have the opportunity to learn human anatomy as it relates to function through the study of bones, cadaver prosections, models, atlas drawings and photographs, and their own bodies. Concentration is on osteology, radiology, arthrology, neuromuscular, vascular, and basic systems anatomy as they apply to physical therapy. Course fees: Lab Assistance fee $10 per hour Gross Anatomy Lab fee $30.

CSBL 7099. Dissertation. 0.5-12 Credit Hours.

Registration for at least one term is required of Ph.D. candidates. Prerequisites: admission to candidacy for Doctor of Philosophy degree.

CSBL 8010. Anatomy 2. 2 Credit Hours.

This course reinforces principles of human anatomy studied in CSBL 7014. Students study human anatomy as it relates to function through cadaver dissection. Concentration is on osteology, radiology, arthrology, neuromuscular, vascular, and basic systems anatomy as they apply to physical therapy. Course fees: Lab Assistance fee $10 per hour Gross Anatomy Lab fee $30 Human Materials fee $865.

CTSR Courses

CTSR 4008. Cardiothoracic Surgery. 4 Credit Hours.

Senior students function as "sub-interns" on the cardiothoracic surgery service, taking part in all aspects of pre-operative and post-operative care in addition to observing and assisting in the operating room. They will be exposed to a wide range of pathophysiology, including cardiovascular, pulmonary and foregut disease, as well as hemodynamics and critical care. Daily responsibilities include rounding and presenting patients in the intensive care unit and inpatient ward, keeping daily records, seeing in patient consults, assisting with patient discharges and mentoring third-year medical students. Students will also evaluate patients in the outpatient clinics and emergency room. They will attend education conferences and present a case at department grand rounds. They will take call as designated by the cardiothoracic surgery services.

CTSR 4050. Congenital & Cardiac Surgery. 4 Credit Hours.

Students will attend daily rounds with the congenital heart team, including cardiologists, cardiac surgeons, pediatric internists and neonatologists. They will participate in the pre-operative evaluation and post-operative care of patients with congenital heart disease, including attendance at weekly conferences with the team. They will perform histories and physical examinations in the hospital and in the cardiology and surgery clinics. They will scrub in for congenital heart operations and cardiac catheterization procedures and present these patients to the team on daily rounds.

CTSR 7000. Off-Campus Rotation In Cardiothoracic Surgery. 4 Credit Hours.

In this course the student will work closely with the preceptor in a clinical setting that can be either in-patient or out-patient or both. The physician can work either in private practice or a residency program setting. The preceptor must be board-certified in CT surgery and have clinical faculty appointment with a LCME-Accredited Medical School. The student must not be a relative of the preceptor. Students must arrange the preceptorship directly with the attending physician.

DEHS Courses

DEHS 5001. Foundations of Ed for the Deaf. 2.5 Credit Hours.

History of the education of the hearing impaired including Deaf Culture and American Sign Language (ASL). Impact of hearing loss on academic access, vocational choice, and personal development. Current trends in academic programming, parent-infant through college, and provisions for multicultural populations.

DEHS 5003. Speech Mech-Anatomy/Physiology/Acoustics. 2.5 Credit Hours.

This course is a study of the component parts of the speech mechanisms and their coordination to permit functional speech, physiology and acoustics of speech, impact of hearing loss on development and maintenance of functional speech skills, and individual assessment procedures. Practicum included.

DEHS 5005. Factors In Child Language Acquisition. 2.5 Credit Hours.

Course content includes the normal progression of language, cognition and social development, and how hearing loss impacts on development; an overview of acquisition of language by children who may have more than one handicapping condition; the nature of bilingual and ESL language learning in relation to hearing loss, including the impact of visual language learning through speech reading and signing systems; and the nature of language development as related to learning theories, communicative functions, and culture. Practicum included.

DEHS 5007. Introduction to Audiology. 3 Credit Hours.

Nature of sound, anatomy, and physiology of hearing; types of testing for hearing loss; analysis of audiograms; fitting of ear molds; operation and design of hearing aids; use and maintenance of FM units; and Cochlear implants and assistive technology. Practicum included.

DEHS 5009. Intro Sign-ASL & Signed English. 2.5 Credit Hours.

This course is a study of the evolution of the various forms of manual communication, review of options available in Texas public schools, and implications of American Sign Language as a first language.

DEHS 5011. Language Development. 3 Credit Hours.

Course content includes the assessment of present language and listening levels in hearing impaired children and methods of aural habilitation and language instruction/therapy. Practicum included.

DEHS 5021. Teaching/Management Apprenticeship 1. 4 Credit Hours.

Students spend time in the education and management/coordination of services for the hearing impaired. Students spend time teaching both hearing and hearing-impaired students and in managing and coordinating social, education, and health services for the hearing impaired. Course fees: Practicum $10.

DEHS 5090. Independent Study. 0.5-4 Credit Hours.

This course will be arranged through DEHS faculty. Topic and mode of study are agreed upon by student and instructor. Semester hours are variable and credit hours will be determined per topic. The course is offered any term. The course may be repeated for credit when topics vary.

DEHS 6002. Comp Assessment, Counseling, Management. 1.5 Credit Hour.

The impact of a hearing loss upon the child, the family, and the community; reactions and adjustments identified and evaluated; delivery of services from birth through adulthood; and newborn screening are included. Crisis periods are identified and coping mechanisms evaluated. Also included are the role of classroom teacher and health professional in providing support to the family, and a multi-professional team approach to long-term management for the hearing impaired.

DEHS 6004. Curriculum Mod-Child W/Hear Loss. 2.5 Credit Hours.

Course content includes the development and adaptation of curricular materials and instructional procedures for the child with hearing impairment; selection and writing of objectives for speech, language, and listening within the content of early childhood education best practices; impact of current research in the effective teaching of reading and the language arts for children with hearing loss, including the identification of techniques and materials useful in meeting the individual needs of each student. Students will have the opportunity to learn adaptive strategies to address the needs of students with multiple handicaps. Practicum included.

DEHS 6006. Best Practices in Early Intervention. 2.5 Credit Hours.

Provision of services to infants, toddlers and preschoolers and their families through public and private agencies. Use of the Auditory-Verbal Therapy approach emphasizing the development of optimum listening skills in children with hearing impairment and the recognition of caregivers as the primary models of spoken language. Includes parent guidance, counseling, education and support. Practicum is included.

DEHS 6008. Speech for Hearing Impaired Student. 2.5 Credit Hours.

This course addresses: specific development and remedial techniques for articulation therapy; assessment of phonetic and phonologic level skills; strategies for elicitation, development; transfer and maintenance of all English phonemes and suprasegmentals; and choosing techniques appropriate to auditory/visual/tactile modalities available to the child with hearing loss. Practicum included.

DEHS 6009. Aural (Re) Habilitation. 2.5 Credit Hours.

This course is designed to study methods of pediatrics aural rehabilitation available for children with hearing loss and the impact of new technologies on therapy and teaching.

DEHS 6010. Mainstream Services for Children with Hearing Loss. 1.5 Credit Hour.

Management of resource and mainstream services in school settings. Logistical considerations in grouping, teacher placement, and the development of individualized educational plans combining language/speech/listening consideration with academic instruction. Development of consultative style of interaction with regular education personnel.

DEHS 6022. Teaching/Management Apprenticeship 2. 4 Credit Hours.

Continuation of Teaching/Management Apprenticeship I. Students will be required to develop a comprehensive portfolio of their experiences and abilities. Outcomes of their knowledge and skills gained in the program are emphasized. Course fees: Practicum $10.

DEHS 6099. Comprehensive Examination. Credit Hours.

The comprehensive examination is required prior to graduation. The examination, which incorporates all critical elements of the curriculum, tests for mastery of knowledge as well as professional skills.

ELEC Courses

ELEC 4077. Wilderness Medicine Enrichment Elective. Credit Hours.

The curriculum consists of lectures, hands-on scenarios and case-based learning. Students will work as a team to care for patients in the backcountry. All scenarios will conclude with a debriefing by the faculty. Lecture content will include an introduction to Wilderness Medicine and medical content topics including tick bites, hyperthermia, hypothermia and infectious diarrhea, splinting, envenomations, lightning injuries and animal bites. Other educational activities will include safe water procurement, map utilization, patient extrication from the wilderness and basic camping skills. The scenarios will consist of role playing by participating faculty and will include different cases encountered in the wilderness. The medical students will work together as a team to find, care for and extricate the patient as necessary. During the three-day trip we will spontaneously role play during other wilderness activities such as hiking, building a fire or even during a lecture. Patients become ill at any point and we try to maintain some element of surprise with the scenarios. Students will be evaluated on their participation in group-based scenarios and a short quiz administered at the conclusion of the course. This is an enrichment elective and "credit" will be given to the students who showed active participation in the learning sessions.

ELEC 5004. Surgical Oncology Service. Credit Hours.

Purpose and objective of this elective is to expose the student to the current and multi-modal approach in the diagnosis and management of cancer. Students will observe and monitor all activities directed to the workup, treatment, and follow-up of patients with cancer. Students will have the chance to observe and participate in the different surgical procedures, specifically those related to the treatment of cancer. He or she will be introduced to and familiarized with the principles and concepts of adjuvant chemotherapy, immunotherapy, and hormonal therapy before and after surgical treatment of different diseases. They will also have the opportunity to observe and partake in the different activities in the conduct of clinical trials as sponsored by the different national cooperative groups, i.e. the Southwest Oncology Group and the National Surgical Adjuvant Breast and Bowel Program. The students will learn the necessity for establishing different protocols in the quest for a greater understanding and improvement in the management of malignant diseases and will participate in the discussion of problems related to cancer patient care during rounds and more didactic teachings during Grand Rounds and the regular conferences of the service. Upon completion of this elective, students will have a fairly significant introduction and familiarization into clinical surgical oncology.

ELEC 5006. Beginning Medical Spanish. Credit Hours.

This is not a Spanish language course, per se, but is designed to teach medical students how to perform specific tasks in Spanish. As such, there is no specific Spanish prerequisite to enroll in this course. Students who are interested in acquiring Spanish language in general are invited to enroll in a traditional Spanish course.

ELEC 5022. History Of Anatomy. Credit Hours.

This course is designed to acquaint medical, dental and graduate students with the history of medicine and especially with the physicians and scientists who made essential discoveries in human anatomy. Using a biographical approach, the course is presented as a seminar with lectures, assigned readings and student presentations.

ELEC 5023. Sports Medicine Perspectives. Credit Hours.

Course will expose students to the clinical practice of orthopaedic sports medicine. This includes exposure to high school, collegiate and professional sports. Emphasis will be on injury evaluation, prevention and treatment. Sports may include football, basketball, track and field, baseball, soccer, gymnastics and water sports.

ELEC 5027. Family Violence Education. Credit Hours.

The course will analyze the dynamics of family violence, including the statistics, myths, types of abuse, characteristics of battered persons, the effect of violence on children, characteristics of batterers, treatment programs, the skills needed for intervention and the responsibilities of the medical profession, the legal profession and law enforcement in family violence.

ELEC 5029. Environmental Medicine/Border Health. Credit Hours.

The South Texas Environmental Education and Research (STEER) program gives participants the opportunity to learn about environmental and public health using an in vivo approach "Show, don't tell". During this month-long elective, participants learn about indoor and outdoor air quality, wastewater treatment, food sanitation, heavy metals, pesticides, international health programs, risk management, epidemiology, and zoonosis control, focusing on border health concerns. Participants will learn from local experts about water pollution, tuberculosis, dengue fever, rabies and traditional health practices such as consulting folk healers. This elective is taught in Laredo, Texas. Participants receive free housing and free transportation to and from activities. This opportunity is open to medical students, residents, nursing students, public health students and health care professionals.

ELEC 5030. Advanced Neuroanatomy. Credit Hours.

This enrichment selective is intended to reinforce basic principles learned in Medical Neuroscience and to explore in greater depth current research and thought in neuroanatomy. Clinical relevance will also be stressed whenever applicable. The instructor will meet with the student(s) 2-3 hours per week for 4 weeks. A 20-page library research paper is also required. The course will be subdivided into the following components - 1) Essential Concepts - Cell Biology of Neurons & Glia, Electrochemical Basis of Neuronal Integration, Development of the Nervous System & Its Disorders; 2) Regional Neuroanatomy- Ventricles and Meninges, Cerebrovascular System, Spinal Cord, and Brainstem Anatomy; 3)Systems Neurobiology - Somatosensory System Chemosenses, Special Senses, Motor System, Extrapyramidal System, Cerebellum, Limbic System; and 4) Homeostatic Mechanisms.

ELEC 5031. Introduction To Emergency Medicine. Credit Hours.

Students will be exposed to clinical emergency medicine in an extracurricular setting by working with assigned preceptors in the University Hospital Emergency Department (with the possible addition of BAMC ED or a community ED experience, including toxicology experience). Students will learn about the specialty of Emergency Medicine and its subspecialties. Students will also receive lectures on core emergency medicine topics and attend case presentations.

ELEC 5032. Interdisciplinary Issues & Approaches to Death & Dying. Credit Hours.

The course provides an opportunity to explore issues and interdisciplinary approaches related to death and dying at both the personal and professional levels. Emphasis is placed on the positive and necessary values of compassion, listening and tolerance for varied beliefs. The course encourages participants to engage in constructive critical analysis through self-discovery about death and dying. Areas for discussion include: values clarification, definitions of death, stages of dying, emotions surrounding loss, survivorship, ethical and legal components of death, and transcultural aspects related to death and dying. Communication will be presented as a primary intervention method in dealing with death related issues. Critical analysis of a variety of situations will be stressed as an integral part of the interdisciplinary approach in determining appropriate therapeutic interventions.

ELEC 5036. Let Your Life Speak: Authentic Decision-Making For Your Medical School Career. Credit Hours.

This course is designed to give students in their first or second year of medical school a unique opportunity to evaluate their personal decision-making process. The course will provide a forum for learning and dialoguing with other students about the various factors from a student's history and present circumstances that impact how the student makes decisions. Questions like, "How will I choose a specialty?" and "How will I maintain my passion for medicine?" will be addressed as the anatomy of the decision-making process is considered. Class will be held in a guided group discussion format with each student also receiving a one-hour personal coaching session with the instructor during the semester.

ELEC 5038. Literature and Medicine 1. Credit Hours.

An elective for second- and fourth-year students, the purpose of the course is for students to use their readings as a tool to prepare for and process their clinical experiences, and to approach their development as people and as physicians. The course also will allow students to interact with other second- and fourth-year students and faculty in a venue that is open and informal. Most of the course will take place on the Web via Blackboard. After each reading block, there will an evening meeting to discuss the story and/or poem. Students will be expected to read the assignments and attend as many of the evening meetings as possible.

ELEC 5039. Literature and Medicine 2. Credit Hours.

An elective for second- and fourth-year students, the purpose of the course is for students to use their readings as a tool to prepare for and process their clinical experiences, and to approach their development as people and as physicians. The course also will allow students to interact with other second- and fourth-year students and faculty in a venue that is open and informal. Most of the course will take place on the Web via Blackboard. After each reading block, there will an evening meeting to discuss the novel and/or poem. Students will be expected to read the assignments and attend as many of the evening meetings as possible.

ELEC 5040. Trauma Enrichment Elective. Credit Hours.

This course is designed to give first- and second-year medical students an introduction to the exciting field of trauma and trauma surgery. It will offer students the opportunity to observe how attendings, medical residents, medical students, and hospital staff work towards caring for patients who suffer from traumatic injury. Students may also have the opportunity to observe the surgeries if approved by the attending on duty.

ELEC 5041. Homelessness, Addiction, & How To Better Care For Patients. Credit Hours.

The goals and objectives of this course are to increase awareness about homelessness and addiction and how they relate to healthcare; to prepare first-and second-year students for working at student-run clinics; and encourage student teaching within all four years of medical school. This a student-run courses, led by MS4 students in the Humanism fellowship, for MS1 and MS2 students with a special interest in learning about issues of homelessness and addiction, and how these relate to the provision of healthcare.

ELEC 5042. Enrichment Elective In Ethics. Credit Hours.

In this longitudinal course, students will be required to undertake an independent study into a specific issue in medical ethics or medical humanities. Students will be required to read on research methods in medical ethics as well as literature in their issue of interest, and then to propose and conduct an original study project, a literature review, a position paper, or an ethical analysis of a particular topic or case. Students will be expected to write an academically rigorous final research report of 10 to 15 pages. Students will be encouraged to produce a final paper that can be submitted for publication in a peer-reviewed bioethics or medical humanities journal. Students will be required to meet with the instructor and/or chosen faculty advisor over the course for assistance, guidance, and discussion.

ELEC 5043. Public Health And The Physician. Credit Hours.

The purpose of this course is to provide a basic understanding of some of the important health issues faced by modern physicians. Each hour of this survey course covers a different public health topic. Half of the class hours will be discussion and education on reading assignments of public health topics. Guest speakers from the university and San Antonio will complement lecture and discussion.

ELEC 5044. Enrichment Elective In Interprofessional Community Service Learning. Credit Hours.

This innovative inter-professional community service learning (CSL) course, offered in partnership with the UT School of Pharmacy, PHR 270S, to allow medical students to integrate meaningful community service with instruction, preparation, and reflection to enrich the learning experience, teach civic responsibility, and strengthen communities. Students will have the opportunity to examine social justice and social determinant of health issues and apply these principles in a structured service learning practicum. The student-led service learning project will address the social and health needs of a community partner and will be conducted with a partner agency in a culturally competent manner. Through online learning modules, readings and discussion; monthly class sessions; a group service learning project; and a structured service learning practicum, this course combines community service with preparation and reflection to help foster civic responsibility in the health professions.

ELEC 5045. Clinical Knowledge And Surgical Skills. Credit Hours.

This elective is for second-year medical students who wish to gain extra insight and experience with the basic skills required for third-year clerkships. The goals of this course are to ease the student's "fear of the unknown" when they first start their surgery clerkship and to improve the educational experience by giving students the framework on which to learn, allowing them to hit the ground running on day one of the surgery clerkship. The course consists of all lectures (case presentations, didactic sessions, student/resident panel) in ELEC 5046 and in addition will include the technical skills sessions.

ELEC 5046. Clinical Knowledge For The Surgical Clerkships. Credit Hours.

This elective is for second-year medical students who wish to gain extra insight to the third-year clerkships. The goals of this course are to ease the student's "fear of the unknown" when they first start their surgery clerkship and to improve the educational experience by giving students the framework on which to learn, allowing them to hit the ground running on day one of the surgery clerkship. The course consists of surgery case presentations, didactic sessions, and a student and resident panel. The course is similar to ELEC 5045 but does NOT include the technical skills sessions.

ELEC 5048. Enrichment Elective in Art. Credit Hours.

This is an interactive, interprofessional course that takes students to the McNay Art Museum to learn physical observation skills. Studies demonstrate that increased observational skills translate to improved physical examination skills. Using artwork as patients, students will have the opportunity to learn how to observe details and how to interpret images based on available evidence. Taught jointly by Health Science Center faculty and McNay museum educators, students will have the opportunity to develop and hone their observation, problem solving, and assessment skills. They will also observe, interpret, and give case reports on the original works of art to teach them the skill of verbalizing descriptions of what is seen, and not to accept assumptions made with a first impression.

ELEC 5049. Health, Human Rights and the Physician. Credit Hours.

This is a survey course in which each hour covers a different Health and Human Rights topic. The course is designed to present an understanding of what are human rights and what human rights issues are relevant to the practice of medicine and delivery of appropriate healthcare. Students will have the opportunity to gain a better understanding of the ever increasingly apparent global problems that exist. This course aims to better equip students to address these relevant health and human rights issues as future physicians.

ELEC 5051. Applied Neuroanatomy. Credit Hours.

This course is aimed at students and faculty who are interested in understanding applied neurosensory pathways. The purpose of the course is to reinforce the neurosensory material in the MSI Neuroanatomy course by applying the material to real world situations via interactive activities and clinical vignettes. Additionally, this course would allow students to use different types of art media to express themselves as they learn the material through different types of art media. The course content and schedule is constructed to correspond with the material and schedule of the MSI Neuroanatomy course. This elective will explore four neurosensory modalities: proprioception/balance, vision, auditory and taste/olfaction. Each modality will be covered in one two-hour class session that will be comprised of a lecture component and its corresponding laboratory component. The course will be open to 15 students.

ELEC 5052. Healthcare Practice and The Business Of Medicine. Credit Hours.

This elective will complement the spring Health Care Reform Forum, which focuses in-depth on issues related to the cost of care and healthcare forum, primary care and access, and graduate medical education.

ELEC 5053. Healthcare Reform Forum. Credit Hours.

The Healthcare Reform Forum is a springtime introductory-level elective on topics related to healthcare reform. The elective consists of a series of scheduled discussions on current topics in healthcare policy.

ELEC 5054. Introduction to Culinary Nutrition. Credit Hours.

Introduction to Culinary Nutrition is a medical student enrichment elective that provides the foundation for learning the principles of culinary nutrition and its role in optimizing health and wellness for the physician as a healer as well as encouraging physicians to serve as role models and educators of their patients.

ELEC 5055. Issues in Women's Healthcare. Credit Hours.

A comprehensive introduction to Women's Health, with an emphasis on topics that are not covered in preclinical curriculum. This course is an enriching supplement to medical school education. It will empower future doctors in any specialty to consider female patients in the context of their unique body processes, and potentially catch symptoms of various health problems early. Lectures will be given throughout the semester. Faculty and local experts in the fields under discussion will be our guest lecturers.

ELEC 5057. Global Health Longitudinal Elective. Credit Hours.

Student demand to learn about global health and participate in global health service learning at the School of Medicine to continues to grow every year. To date, the Center for Medical Humanities & Ethics has met this demand successfully. However, students who complete the Longitudinal Global Health elective (ELEC 5047) in their first year are now requesting the opportunity to continue their education in global health and engagement with global health service learning. These experienced students play an important role on subsequent trips as they serve as peer mentors and trip coordinators, improving the overall quality of the services our teams provide abroad. As a result, we are requesting the creation of a new Global Health Longitudinal Elective, specifically for second year medical students who have previously completed ELEC 5047. The Center has set a precedent for offering another elective course for students wishing to participate in the Literature in Medicine course a second time, by offering the course to both second year ( ELEC 5038-5039) and fourth year (MEDI 7004 ) medical students. This proposed elective will utilize a community service learning model, in which preparation, mentorship, evaluation, reflection and reporting are essential in meeting the expressed need of a particular community. The elective will also provide a foundation of practical knowledge in global health and will optimize the students' overseas experiences, maximize the safety of their travel, facilitate their adaptation to working in different cultural settings, and maximize their impact in the communities where they serve. The course material will be presented through a variety of approaches, including lectures, small group case discussions, optional laboratory sessions, practical workshops, and online learning modules. Prerequisites: ELEC 5047.

ELEC 5106. Intermediate Medical Spanish. Credit Hours.

This course is designed to offer first- and second-year medical students the opportunity to acquire important skills to communicate with Spanish-speaking only patients in a culturally sensitive environment. This class is restricted to students who have an intermediate level of written and conversational Spanish and/or have reached at least a Beginner level.

ELEC 5206. Advanced Medical Spanish. Credit Hours.

This course is designed to provide students with the specific medical vocabulary and terminology necessary to communicate with and help treat Latino patients with limited English proficiency. This class is restricted to students who have a previous knowledge of the Spanish language and have reached at least a conversational level. The course will include specific vocabulary groups relating to assessment and care of patients, vocabulary to establish rapport, and discussions leading to cultural competencies. Students will have the opportunity to ask questions and provide answers in common medical situations in Spanish, conduct patient interviews, write medical histories, learn how to conduct physical exams in Spanish, and discuss readings related to the field.

ELEC 6067. Fundamentals of Neuroethics. Credit Hours.

Recent advances in neuroscience have considerably improved our understanding of brain function. However, the fascinating examination of brain's mysteries often intersects with the concerns of ethics and public policy. This course aims at presenting and discussing philosophical and scientific perspectives on major bioethical issues pertinent to neuroscience research. Several subjects will be covered in the course, including the effects of pharmacological and surgical interventions on the brain/min binomial, therapy versus enhancement, brain imaging and mental privacy, neurobiology of decision making, consciousness, unconsciousness, and death.

EMED Courses

EMED 3001. Emergency Medicine. Credit Hours.

This elective introduces the third-year medical student to the specialty of emergency medicine and reviews principles of emergency care that will benefit a graduate entering any specialty.

EMED 3005. Emergency Medicine Core Clerkship. 4 Credit Hours.

This four week core clerkship introduces the 3rd year medical students to the specialty of emergency medicine and reviews principles of emergency care that will benefit a graduate entering any specialty.

EMED 4002. Topics in Emergency Medicine. 2 Credit Hours.

This elective will allow students to create, implement, and/or complete special clinical, research and/or educational projects in the specialty of Emergency Medicine. Specific learning objectives will be written and tailored to the project by the supervising faculty member with approval by the course director prior to the start of the elective.

EMED 4005. Emergency Medicine Selective. 4 Credit Hours.

This sub-internship is designed to prepare students for the intense and responsible role of the intern. The sub-intern is an integral member of the team and will participate in all team activities and medical care for his/her patients, under the supervision of the Emergency Medicine attending. IN additional to working clinical shifts, students are expected to participate in didactic sessions and perform ambulane ride-alongs to successfully complete the course. This course is an outpatient selective. Prerequisite: EMED 3005.

EMED 4051. Emergency Ultrasound. 4 Credit Hours.

Senior (4th year) medical students will be instructed in the basic use of ultrasound equipment and its application in the emergency department. Topics to be covered during this elective include ultrasound equipment and knobology, basic ultrasound physics, ultrasound-guided vascular access(peripheral, central, arterial), Extended Focused Assessment with Sonography for Trauma (E-Fast), aortic ultrasound, pelvic ultrasound, biliary ultrasound, bedside echocardiography, musculoskeletal ultrasound, deep venous thrombosis evaluation, ocular ultrasound, ultrasound guided regional anesthesia, thoracic ultrasound, renal and bladder ultrasound, ultrasound-guided procedures. This training will be accomplished with a combination of didactic lectures, extensive supervised bedside ultrasound training on emergency department patients, independent student ultrasound scanning sessions, required textbook reading, weekly video review sessions and weekly literature review. Each student will be required to complete a minimum of 100 complete ultrasound examinations covering the scope of the course material. This elective is designed to provide a base knowledge in emergency ultrasound for students interested in pursuing an emergency medicine residency.

EMED 4076. Emergency Medicine Rotation - Brooke Army Medical Center. 4 Credit Hours.

BAMC is a Level 1 Trauma Center seeking approximately 50,000 patients per year. All patient types are seen: trauma victims, complicated medical patients, children, OB/GYN patients and psychiatric patients. There is no "compartmentalization" of the Emergency Department. Students work on average of 5 eight-hour shifts per week with a mixture of days, evenings, nights and weekends. Students work one-on-one with staff physicians or senior emergency medicine residents. There are five hours of Grand Rounds per week. There is Morning Report every Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday. Each student has the opportunity to participate in a procedure lab, DPL, chest tubes, thoracotomy, transvenous pacing and cricothyroidotomy. This rotation must be arranged through Vanessa Soto, even if you are a HPSP student. No late Drops will be accepted.

EMED 7000. Off Campus Rotation In Emergency Medicine. 4 Credit Hours.

All off campus rotations must be approved by the designated faculty member prior to the beginning of the rotation (at least one week before the course begins). Credit will not be given for any rotation that has not been approved in advance. Required paperwork includes: "Course Approval" form, a written letter or email of acceptance from the physical preceptor with the start and ending dates of the course/rotation, and a course description of your learning objectives and responsibilities during the rotation. Forms must include a complete address and telephone number for the off campus location or residence address for the student while at the off campus site. Forms will not be approved after the rotation has already begun.

EMST Courses

EMST 5001. Basic Cardiac Life Support. Credit Hours.

Course instruction satisfies AHA guidelines for Basic Cardiac Life Support (BCLS). Successful completion merits AHA BLS Provider course completion card. Topics include basic airway and ventilatory management of the choking and/or unconscious infant, child, or adult victim; cardiac chest compression techniques; automated external defibrillation (AED). AHA standard written and skills exams administered.

FAPR Courses

FAPR 4008. Research in Family Medicine in San Antonio or Harlingen. 4 Credit Hours.

At least 8 weeks before the elective's starting date the student must submit a completed course approval form and a written document that includes: the research topic; a printed literature search on that topic; readings on research design and/or statistical analysis that will be read as part of the course activities; the dates and times and locations of meetings between the student and the faculty member; expected course outcomes (e.g. presentations); and a signed statement from Dr. Sandra Burger (SA) or Dr. Adela Valdez (the RAHC) saying she will mentor and work with the student on the project.

FAPR 4074. Rural Clinical Experience in Family Medicine (AHEC). 4 Credit Hours.

The Department of Family and Community Medicine (DFCM) and the South Central Area Health Education Center (AHEC) at the UT Health Science Center at San Antonio collaborate to provide fourth year medical students strong primary care training at various rural AHEC clinical training sites in South Texas. The experience occurs primarily in ambulatory settings, but may include inpatient experiences with physicians who follow their patients in hospital settings. The student, under the direct supervision of a physician certified by the American Board of Family Medicine, evaluates and manages a wide array of medical problems. The student also gains experience in preventing common disorders and medical problems and works with other health professionals to better understand the health care needs of and services available to patients in rural settings. All paperwork must be submitted to the Department of Family and Community Medicine at least 10 working days prior to the start of the course.

FAPR 4101. Complementary & Alternative Medicine on US/Mexico Border. 0.5 Credit Hours.

Course is designed to enable fourth year medical students to problem-solve common situations where allopathic and alternative medicine interface. Students will meet twice a week for 4 weeks, for one hour, with the instructor. The instructor will teach the students about complementary and alternative medicine practices on the US/Mexico border. The students will be asked to review case vignettes to discuss these practices and how they would deal with certain common situations where alternative medicine interfaces with allopathic medicine. These discussions may lead to ethical and medicolegal issues.

FAPR 4103. Women's Health Seminar. 0.5 Credit Hours.

The students will meet once a week for 5 weeks for two hour, with the course instructor. The instructor will present women patient case vignettes and lead a discussion of the case. The students will then be asked to read medical literature in regarding women's health issues. The case vignettes will be in the one of six health disparities (Diabetes, Cardiovascular Disease, Cancer, HIV/AIDS, Infant Mortality and Childhood and Adult Immunizations).

FAPR 4201. Practice Management-RAHC. 0.5 Credit Hours.

This course will cover Medical Office Management issues. Topics will include Medical Insurance, Coding ICD-9 & CPT-4, Medical Insurance Billing, Computerized Medical Office Software(s), 3rd party payments, contractual issues and other related topics. This course will be beneficial to those medical students in preparation for internship and future office practice.

FAPR 4202. Dermatology: A Short Review Course. 0.5 Credit Hours.

This 8-hour dermatology course will follow the American Academy of Family Practice (AAFP) board dermatology curriculum and will include the following topics: basic components of dermatology and common dermatologic problems, as well as common skin cancers. This is a Family Medicine MS4 didactic elective for Harlingen.

FAPR 4203. Review of Evidence-Based Medicine. 0.5 Credit Hours.

This course aims to provide medical students with a set of evidence-based exercises relating to diagnosis, prognosis, therapy, and harm. Students will be asked to formulate clinical questions so that they can be answered, to search for information, to critically appraise the evidence for validity and clinical importance, and apply the evidence in clinical practice. This is an MS4 didactic elective for Harlingen.

INTD Courses

INTD 1091. Independent Study. 4 Credit Hours.

Students will work directly with a faculty advisor or assistant dean to develop an independent plan of study.

INTD 3001. International Elective. Credit Hours.

Students will work with the course director and Assistant Director of Global Health to identify an appropriate international elective site, using established sites/programs or one that the student discovers on their own. All rotations must be vetted and approved by the course director and will adhere to a community service-learning model that is a structured educational experience combining community service with preparation and reflection. Students are expected to help shape the learning experience around community-identified needs and advance insight related to the context in which service is provided, the connection between service and academic coursework, and students' roles as citizens and professionals. Students will spend 4 weeks living and working at an international service site. Sites may allow for a range of experiences, such as participating in patient care, conducting clinical or public health research, and/or participating in a language immersion program. There may also be opportunities for patient education and emphasis on efforts of local empowerment, aiming to build up the communities in a sustainable way. Regardless of the focus, all sites must be supervised by qualified health care providers. Students are encouraged to integrate themselves into the health care delivery system, to explore community needs that they could address, and when possible, to strive to make an impact through community education, home visits, and research. Reflection essays serve as a way to process experiences, including clinical cases, new perspectives gained, and analysis of health care disparities, and strategies for the overcoming poverty-related health problems. Students are encouraged to share their experiences upon return through a formal presentation.

INTD 3002. School of Medicine Research Elective. Credit Hours.

Students will participate in basic or clinical research projects under the supervision of university faculty. The goal of this elective is to immerse students in a rich research environment and provide an opportunity to work with research mentors to fully engage in the research process from writing the proposal to collecting the data to disseminating research results. This elective is open to students who already have an established working relationship with a faculty member and who wish time to continue their work, students who wish to establish a new project, and for students who are in the MD-MPH degree program and MD with Distinction in Research Program. Interested students must contact the course director prior to the enrollment date to express interest in the elective and receive further instructions on the application process for the research and identification/ confirmation of the faculty mentor.

INTD 3030. Clinical Foundations. 3 Credit Hours.

The purposes of this course are to 1) Prepare students to excel as learners in clinical settings by providing foundations for clinical skills including finding information, presenting cases, charting, writing orders, completing other paperwork, and clinical reasoning including basic EKG and radiograph interpretation; 2) Assist students in developing new skills expected of third-year clerks including lab skills (phlebotomy, ABG, blood cultures, hemoccult cards), IV insertion, PPD placement, sterile gowning/ gloving, basic suturing, nasogastric tube placement, O2 management, and Basic Cardiac Life Support; and 3) Prepare students for their new roles in clinical settings, where they encounter patient care responsibilities along with patient privacy and ethical issues. Successful completion of the first two years of Medical School and approval of the director of the MD/PhD program are required.

INTD 3058. Hospice and Palliative Medicine. Credit Hours.

This rotation offers clinical experience in Hospice and Palliative Medicine (HPM). Palliative care provides treatment for seriously ill hospitalized and ambulatory patients and focuses on symptom management, enhancement of function, physical comfort, quality of life, psychosocial support, and communication about the goals of medical care for the patients as well as their families.

INTD 3091. Independent Study. 9 Credit Hours.

Students will work directly with a faculty advisor or assistant dean to develop an independent plan of study.

INTD 4007. Interprofessional Community Service Learning. 2 Credit Hours.

This is an innovative interdisciplinary service learning (CSL) course offered in partnership with the UT School of Pharmacy, PHR 270S, to allow medical students to integrate meaningful community service with instruction, preparation, and reflection to enrich the learning experience, teach civic responsibility, and strengthen communities. This course will provide the opportunity for students to examine social justice and social determinant of health issues and apply these principles in a structured serviced learning practicum. The student-led service learning project will address the social and health needs of a community partner and will be conducted with the partner agency in a culturally competent manner. Through online learning modules, readings, and discussion; monthly class sessions; a group service learning project; and a structured service learning practicum, this course combines community service with preparation and reflection to foster civic responsibility in the health professions.

INTD 4008. Interprofessional Care in HIV. 0.5 Credit Hours.

Students will have the opportunity to learn how to function as a member of an interprofessional team in HIV case management. The objective is for students to become familiar with issues of patient safety, health literacy, medication reconciliation, and interprofessional teamwork in HIV care. This is an elective didactic course. This is an elective didactic course.

INTD 4009. Interprofessional Care in HIV. 2 Credit Hours.

Students will have the opportunity to learn how to function as a member of an interprofessional team in HIV case management, and become familiar with issues of: patient safety, health literacy, medication reconciliation, treatment guidelines, and interprofessional teamwork in HIV care.

INTD 4015. Humanism in Medicine Fellowship. 2 Credit Hours.

This is a longitudinal 4th-year elective to support and nourish the inherent altruism of our students. This elective will bring together like-minded students and faculty who have a passion for caring for the medically underserved in their communities. The students will take a leadership role in managing and directing the student-run clinics at the Alpha Home, SAMM Transitional Living and Learning Center, Haven for Hope, Travis Park Dermatology (under faculty supervision). Clinical experiences will be at these clinics. This elective will include a few evening seminars throughout the year in which students and faculty meet to discuss social justice, how to start a free clinic, homelessness and topics chosen by the students. Every student will complete a project of their choice over the year.

INTD 4018. Independent Elective in Ethics. 2 Credit Hours.

In this longitudinal course, students will be required to undertake an independent study into a specific issue in medical ethics or medical humanities. Students will be required to read on research methods in medical ethics as well as literature in their issue of interest, and then to propose and conduct an original study project, a literature review, a position paper, or an ethical analysis of a particular topic or case. Students will be expected to write an academically rigorous final research report of 10 to 15 pages. Students will be encouraged to produce a final paper that can be submitted for publication in a peer-reviewed bioethics or medical humanities journal. Students will be required to meet with the instructor and/or chosen faculty advisor over the course for assistance, guidance, and discussion. (Center for Medical Humanities and Ethics).

INTD 4019. Clinical Ethics. 2 Credit Hours.

Students in this two-week course will have the opportunity to focus on work in clinical ethics consultation. The student will be required to participate in rounds as an ethicist, do in-depth reading on clinical ethics consultation, observe clinical ethics consults, attend ethics committee meetings, and provide an educational seminar to hospital staff on an issue of ethical significance.

INTD 4025. Healthcare Practice and Policy Elective. 0.5 Credit Hours.

The Healthcare Practice Elective is an introductory-level, discussion-based, eight-hour course targeted to fourth-year medical students. The course focuses generally on practice and policy issues of payment methodologies, cost-effectiveness, and access to care.

INTD 4030. Preparing for Global Health Work. 2 Credit Hours.

This is a 2-week multidisciplinary course for 4th-year medical students who are planning future global health experiences, arising in response to enormous interest in international medicine, with increasing numbers of students choosing to spend time overseas during medical school. This preparatory course aims to provide a foundation of practical knowledge in global health to optimize the students' overseas experiences, facilitate their adaptation to working in different cultural settings, and maximize their impact in the communities where they serve. Topics include chronic and infectious disease, parasite infection, prioritizing community resources, health disparities, ethical dilemmas, cultural awareness, and professionalism. Course material is presented through a variety of approaches, including lectures, small-group case discussions, laboratory sessions, and online learning modules.

INTD 4045. Patient Notes- Enrichment Elective. Credit Hours.

It is an interactive, inter-professional course that engages students in music listening sessions to teach students active listening skills. Through various forms of music, students will learn how to actively listen for specific details to gain insight on meaning, become comfortable with ambiguity and interpretation, and develop pattern recognition skills to quickly recognize deviation. Students will also develop stronger methodology for writing patients notes through conceptual practice of SOAP format notes for music pieces. Taught jointly by UTHSCSA faculty and professional musicians, this strategy of applying practical skills to an abstract concept such as music will refine these skills for students in clinical settings. Specifically, this course aims to improve interpersonal communication skills, and organizational note writing. This is also an opportunity for students to practice problems solving with other healthcare professionals.

INTD 4048. Art Rounds. 2 Credit Hours.

This is an interactive, interprofessional course that takes students to the McNay Art Museum to learn physical observation skills. Studies demonstrate that increased observational skills translate to improved physical examination skills. Using artwork as patients, students will have the opportunity to learn how to observe details and how to interpret images based on available evidence. Taught jointly by Health Science Center faculty and McNay museum educators, students will have the opportunity to develop and hone their observation, problem solving, and assessment skills. They will also observe, interpret, and give case reports on the original works of art to teach them the skill of verbalizing descriptions of what is seen, and not to accept assumptions made with a first impression.

INTD 4058. Hospice and Palliative Medicine Elective. 4 Credit Hours.

This rotation offers clinical experience in Hospice and Palliative Medicine (HPM). Palliative care provides treatment for seriously ill hospitalized and ambulatory patients and focuses on symptom management, enhancement of function, physical comfort, quality of life, psychosocial support, and communication about the goals of medical care for the patients as well as their families.

INTD 4103. Communication Skills. 0.5 Credit Hours.

To introduce fourth year medical students to the principles of conducting public interviews, presentations and effectively disseminating information to the communities they will serve.

INTD 4104. Improving Patient Outcomes. 0.5 Credit Hours.

This course is designed to increase a student's knowledge of and skills in identifying systemic problems with health care delivery and patient safety, collecting and analyzing data, generating solutions, presenting results and evaluating peers. The course objectives include facilitating systems thinking, exposing students to the ACGME general competencies (with emphasis on practice-based learning and improvement and systems-based practice), increasing understanding of health care economics and working in teams.

INTD 4105. Medical Jurisprudence. 0.5 Credit Hours.

The course will center on the Texas Medical Practice Act and applicable federal laws.

INTD 4106. Practical Ethics For Healers. 0.5 Credit Hours.

The course is the capstone of the four-year longitudinal curriculum in humanities and ethics. The goals are to reflect upon 1) physician's values, attitudes, and their intersection with cultural values and attitudes; 2) the historical and moral traditions of medicine in the context of society, politics, spirituality, and the health care system; and 3) the personal identity of a doctor.

INTD 4107. The Skin Around Us: A View of Skin Disease from a Humanities Perspective. 4 Credit Hours.

This elective is for fourth year medical students with a special interest in learning about skin diseases through a humanities perspective. Throughout the four week course, students will attend daily clinics, create a project and write an essay on activities encountered during the elective. The students will also complete brief writing assignments each week after watching videos, movies, and/or reading books.

INTD 4110. Getting Ready to Teach During Your Residency Program. 0.5 Credit Hours.

The goal of this 8-hour course is to help senior medical students, who will be residents in a few months, develop teaching skills that will enhance the quality of their interactions with students. The course will be conducted in an interactive workshop format to allow participants to practice important teaching skills for residents. These include 1) orienting and priming students to their responsibilities and roles and accepting the personal role of teacher and role model, 2) giving feedback to improve student performance, 3) helping students to improve their patient presentations-the use of questioning, and 4) coaching procedural and technical skills. The participants will practice these skills and receive feedback from their course peers and instructors based on the guidelines for clinical teachers in action with students and provide critiques. Large and small group discussions and role plays will be used to reinforce teaching principles.

INTD 4201. Getting Ready To Teach During Your Residency-RAHC. 0.5 Credit Hours.

The goal of this course is to help senior medical students, who will be residents in a few months, develop teaching skills that will enhance the quality of their interactions with medical students. The course addresses four important residents¿ teaching skills: (1), teaching learners with different learning styles, (2) providing constructive feedback, (3), teaching at the bedside, and (4) teaching psychomotor procedures.

INTD 4205. Veritas Mentors in Medicine Longitudinal Elective. 2 Credit Hours.

This is longitudinal elective and the course work requirements will be for 2 week credit and must be complete by March 1st. Evaluation of MiM performance will include feedback from faculty mentors and students.

INTD 4210. School of Medicine Research Elective Level 1. 4 Credit Hours.

Medical research is multidisciplinary and broad in scope. Students will participate in basic, clinical research, quality improvement, or patient safety research projects under the supervision of faculty in the Health Science Center. The goal of this elective is to immerse students in a rich scholarly environment and provide an opportunity to work with research/faculty mentors to fully engage in a scholarly research process from writing the proposal to collecting the data to disseminating results. This elective is open to students who already have an established working relationship with a faculty member and who wish time to continue their work, students who wish to establish a new project, and for students who are in the MD-MPH degree program and MD with Distinction in Research Program. Interested students must submit a research elective application which includes the faculty mentor the student will work, to the office of UME, no later than 12 weeks before the research elective is to begin. Applications will be reviewed and confirmed or declined no later than 8 weeks prior to the proposed start date of the elective. Students will be able to 1) Formulate a research question and identify a research methodology to answer that question; 2) understand research ethics and apply an ethical approach to research design, implementation, and dissemination 3) design a research study and gather quality data; 4) apply and interpret basic biostatistics relevant to the individual research project; 5) write scientific reports. The supervising faculty member will evaluate the performance of the student using a standard, research specific, medical student evaluation form. Students will receive a Pass or Fail summative grade at the conclusion of the 4 week elective. Faculty will be expected to give the student formative feedback after two weeks to assist the student in meeting all expectations to pass the elective.

INTD 4211. School of Medicine Research Elective Level 2. 4 Credit Hours.

Medical research is multidisciplinary and broad in scope. Students will participate in basic, clinical research, quality improvement, or patient safety research projects under the supervision of faculty in the Health Science Center. The goal of this elective is to immerse students in a rich scholarly environment and provide an opportunity to work with research/faculty mentors to fully engage in a scholarly research process from writing the proposal to collecting the data to disseminating results. This elective is open to students who already have an established working relationship with a faculty member and reflects their increasing experience with the research process. INTD 4210 Level 1 elective or evidence of past experience knowledge and/or skills is a prerequisite. The expectation is that enrolled students will continue with research experiences begun in INTD 4210 Level 1 including students pursuing the MD-MPH degree and MD with Distinction in Research. Interested students must submit a research elective application which includes the faculty mentor the student will work, to the office of UME, no later than 12 weeks before the research elective is to begin. Applications will be reviewed and confirmed or declined no later than 8 weeks prior to the proposed start date of the elective.

INTD 4212. School of Medicine Research Elective Level 3. 4 Credit Hours.

Medical research is multidisciplinary and broad in scope. Students will participate in basic, clinical research, quality improvement, or patient safety research projects under the supervision of faculty in the Health Science Center. The goal of this elective is to immerse students in a rich scholarly environment and provide an opportunity to work with research/faculty mentors to fully engage in a scholarly research process from writing the proposal to collecting the data to disseminating results. Students enrolled in this course will have prior experience with research and ongoing research activities. As such, this elective is open to students who already have an established working relationship with a faculty member and reflects their increasing experience with the research process. INTD 4211 Level 2 electives is a prerequisite. As with INTD 4211 Level 2, the expectation is that enrolled students will continue with research experiences begun in INTD 4210 Level 1 and INTD 4211 Level 2 including students pursuing the MD-MPH degree and MD with Distinction in Research or produce evidence of past experience knowledge and/or skills which are deemed equivalent to these prerequisites. Interested students must submit a research elective application which includes the faculty mentor the student will work, to the office of UME, no later than 12 weeks before the research elective is to begin. Applications will be reviewed and confirmed or declined no later than 8 weeks prior to the proposed start date of the elective. Students will be able to formulate a research question and identify a research methodology to answer that question; understand research ethics and apply an ethical approach to research design, implementation, and dissemination; design a research study and gather quality data; apply and interpret basic biostatistics relevant to the individual research project; write scientific reports. The supervising faculty member will evaluate the performance of the student using a standard, research specific, medical student evaluation form. Students will receive a Pass or Fail summative grade at the conclusion of the 4 week elective. Faculty will be expected to give the student formative feedback after two weeks to assist the student in meeting all expectations to pass the elective.

INTD 5005. Core Course 1: Biochemistry. 2 Credit Hours.

Topics to be covered include: protein structure; properties of enzymes; structure, biosynthesis, and function of lipids; pathways and regulation of carbohydrate metabolism and biosynthesis and regulation of amino acids, nucleotides, and related compounds. Prerequisites: consent of instructor.

INTD 5007. Advanced Cellular And Molecular Biology. 4 Credit Hours.

This course provides an in-depth learning experience that instructs students on the fundamentals of molecular biology and cell biology as well as prepares the student to evaluate and design new research in the cutting-edge areas of modern molecular biology and cell biology. The course combines a didactic program of lectures along with a small group discussion format in which students interact closely with a group of faculty who have active research programs. The course focuses on active areas of research in molecular biology: Chromatin structure, DNA Transcription, DNA Replication and Repair, Recombination, RNA processing and regulation, Protein processing, targeting and degradation and in cell biology: Cell Signaling and Communication, Cell Growth, and Cell Death. Each week, the faculty provide students with didactic lectures on a current research area. Students and faculty will then jointly discuss key publications that serve to bridge the gap between the fundamental underpinnings of the field and the state of the art in that area.

INTD 5013. Perio/Pros/Endo/Orth Interdisciplinary Course 1. 1 Credit Hour.

A seminar that brings together the residents and graduate staff from the periodontic, prosthodontic,endodontic and orthodontic postdoctoral programs to share clinically relevant multidisciplinary information. Patient diagnostic evaluations and treatment plans are evaluated in an interactive environment. Selected topics involving new advancements are presented and discussed.

INTD 5020. Dental Biomed Core 1. 4 Credit Hours.

The Biomedical Core Course will provide a multidisciplinary approach to basic science instruction as it relates to the clinical practice of dentistry. Both basic science and clinical science faculty will participate to provide a sound base of material required by each program. Individual programs will supplement the Biomedical Core Course in the basic science areas particular to that discipline. This combination of core instruction with individual supplementation should provide the advanced education student the appropriate background in biomedical science.

INTD 5021. Dental Biomed Core 2. 1 Credit Hour.

This course is a continuation of MSDS 5020 Dental Biomedical Core Course 1.

INTD 5023. Research Ethics. 1 Credit Hour.

The goal of this course is to provide the Master's student an opportunity to gain the essential standards necessary for training and education approved by the National Institute of Health. This course links to the web-based NIH Clinical Research Training On-Line Course http://www.cc.nih.gov/training/training/crt/infor.html for Principal Investigators that is required for all individuals conducting research.

INTD 5030. Introduction To Patient Care. 5 Credit Hours.

The first component of this course is an informatics module so that students become familiar with their new computers and are trained on specific software. In the second and overlapping component, students are assigned to a variety of small-group rotations in a clinical setting to prepare them for patient-care activities. In the first semester, the students are required to become certified in basic life support. They also are required to rotate through a clinic orientation that is followed by a rotation as an assistant in the General Practice Groups. They are expected to follow proper infection control protocol and utilize some basic assisting skills. They also are required to rotate through a head and neck exam activity, followed with a patient activity in the second semester. Second semester activities also include intraoral radiography technique, a clinic component of their periodontics, and school-based prevention courses, a sealant lab and clinic, and radiographic interpretation. Students are evaluated primarily on professional development expectations.

INTD 5040. Fundamentals Of Neuroscience1: Molecular, Cellular, & Developmental Neuroscience. 2 Credit Hours.

This course is intended to introduce students to a broad survey of the basics of molecular, cellular and developmental neuroscience. The course is organized into a series of three modules: biochemical and cellular properties of nervous system cells, development of neuronal systems, and neutrotransmission and neuromodulation, which covers the fundamentals of these three areas. Current topics and concepts are discussed in discussion sessions that include student participation. Two components; Neuroscience students register for both PHYL 5041 and INTD 5040.

INTD 5043. Fundamentals Of Neuroscience 2: Systems Neuroscience. 3 Credit Hours.

This course, the second component of our broad survey of the basics of neuroscience, begins at the level of the neural circuit, and guides the students through an understanding of increasingly complex levels of organization and function in the brain. Topics include neurotransmitter systems, sensory and motor function, motivated behavior, regulation and integration of autonomic, behavioral, and emotional responses in the limbic system, higher order cognitive processes, and the neurobiological basis underlying some important psychiatric disorders and their treatment.

INTD 5046. Metanalysis In Cognitive Neuroimaging. 2.5 Credit Hours.

The objective of this course is to familiarize students with human functional brain imaging methods, experimental designs, statistical analyses, inferential strategies, and content. Students are guided through a literature-based research project that culminates in a quantitative metanalysis of a set of studies using similar tasks.

INTD 5047. Neuroanatomy. 2 Credit Hours.

The purpose of this course is to provide students with a practical working knowledge of the structure of both the peripheral and central nervous system. The emphasis will be on the organization of the human brain, although the brains of other species may also be included if appropriate for a specific brain region. The course will look at each of the individual components of the central nervous system in some depth but will also emphasize the complex integration of these various components into a functional brain. The topics covered in the course are specifically designed to mesh in time with those covered in Fundamentals of Neuroscience 2 describing the function of these areas. For this reason, it would be best if these two courses were taken concomitantly. The course will be didactic with digital images, models, and wet specimens included in the course.

INTD 5051. Research Methodology and Evidence-Based Practice. 2 Credit Hours.

This course is designed to introduce dental residents and faculty to critical thinking, research methodology, and evidence-based practice skills.

INTD 5064. Applied Statistics for Health Care Practitioners. 3 Credit Hours.

This online course focuses on the application of descriptive and inferential statistics in research studies. Students are expected to gain knowledge and skills that will enable them to understand, interpret, and evaluate statistical results; work with a consultant statistician; and use software to enter, analyze, and summarize data. Course requirements include homework assignments, online discussions and/or chats, and periodic projects.

INTD 5066. Laughter is the Best Medicine: An Interdisciplinary Elective about Humor, Healing, and Healthcare. 1 Credit Hour.

This class is a serious look at humor! The physiological and psychological benefits of humor, as well as its therapeutic use with patient interactions, will be explored. Students will learn how to develop and improve their personal use of humor to combat burn out, through techniques to enhance coping skills and stress reduction. Student participation and interaction is integral to the content delivery.

INTD 5067. Introduction To Bioinformatics And Computational Biology. 2 Credit Hours.

The course will be taught by faculty from Biochemistry, Cellular & Structural Biology, CCRI, Periodontics, and faculty from UTSA. The course will be an introduction to methods and tools for working with DNA sequences and protein families, learning basic Unix networking, overview of numerical modeling, systems biology approaches to complex diseases, gene expression analysis, bioinformatics in clinical research, statistical tools for complex datasets, proteomics, structural methods for protein biology, chemoinformatics, molecular modeling, and mathematical model building.

INTD 5074. Topics In Translational Medical Product Development. 1 Credit Hour.

It is crucial to understand the intricate process of translating basic research into market driven products, navigate the complex pathways of intellectual property management and the regulatory affairs of agencies such as the FDA. This course will offer students in biomedical sciences the opportunity to integrate industry-relevant training and experience with their basic science education. The course will explore the marketing and regulatory process by which a biomedical product is developed and brought to commercialization.

INTD 5075. Complementary Healthcare for the Clinician. Credit Hours.

The goal of this elective is to introduce future doctors to practices outside of the classical medical school curriculum that promote an evidence-based approach to wellness. This is so that the medical students of the UTHSC School of Medicine are informed about the reality, evidence and rumor surrounding a variety of commonly used alternative and supplementary healthcare practices. The of this class is not to make the student an expert in areas such as acupuncture or yoga, but to be well informed of the role of such practices as it relates to patient treatment and wellness. To this end, all the classes will have a practical component which will allow the students to experience the alternative modalities in a structured setting.

INTD 5081. Topics In Cardiovascular Research. 1 Credit Hour.

This course is designed to familiarize students with the current literature related to cardiovascular disease. Each week a different research topic selected from the recent literature is presented and discussed. Students are expected to attend and participate in the discussions. In addition, students are required to prepare and present once during the semester. A list of previous and current course presentations will be available online.

INTD 5082. Responsible Conduct of Research. 1.5 Credit Hour.

This foundational course introduces students to core ethical content necessary for responsible research conduct. Through interactive seminars, students will learn about (1) scientists as responsible members of society (contemporary ethical issues in biomedical research and environmental/social impacts of research), (2) policies for research with human subjects and vertebrate animals, (3) collaborative research, (4) conflicts of interest (personal, professional, financial), (5) data acquisition and laboratory tools (management, sharing, ownership), (6) responsible authorship and publication, (7) mentor/trainee responsibilities and relationships, (8) peer review, and (9) research misconduct (forms of misconduct and management policies).

INTD 5091. Special Topics. 1-4 Credit Hours.

This is a placeholder course, for which graduate students may register, if they are unable to select a specific track core course at the time of registration. Tracks are: Biology of Aging, Cancer Biology; Cell and Molecular Biology; Genetics, Genomics, & Development; Membrane Biology & Cell Signaling; Metabolism & Metabolic Disorders; Microbiology & Immunology; Molecular Biophysics & Biochemistry; Molecular, Cellular, & Integrative Physiology; Neuroscience; and Pharmacology. The course may be repeated for credit.

INTD 5094. Independent Study. 1-4 Credit Hours.

This elective allows for detailed in-depth study in a specific area of study. The area and mode of study are to be agreed upon by the student and instructor. The course may be repeated for credit when the area of study varies. Clock hours are to be arranged. Prerequisites: Graduate standing and consent of instructor.

INTD 6002. Ethics In Research. 0.5 Credit Hours.

This course covers topics relevant to ethics in scientific research. The course is taught on a case-study basis, dealing with real and hypothetical situations relevant to the conduct of scientific research. Topics discussed will include, but will not be limited to: data management, peer review, recognizing scientific misconduct, authorship, and The University of Texas regulations relevant to human and animal research. This course is required of all doctoral graduate students.

INTD 6007. Advanced Cell Biology. 2 Credit Hours.

This course provides an in-depth learning experience that instructs students on the fundamentals of cell biology as well as prepares the student to evaluate and design new research in the cutting-edge areas of modern cell biology. The course combines a didactic program of lectures along with a small-group discussion format in which students interact closely with a group of faculty who have active research programs. The course focuses on active areas of research in cell biology: Cell Signaling and Communication, Cell Growth, and Cell Death. Each week, the faculty the jointly discuss key publications that serve the bridge the gap between the fundamental underpinnings of the field and the state of the art in that area. Students and faculty will then jointly discuss key publications that serve to bridge the gap between the fundamental underpinnnings of the field and the state of the art in that area.

INTD 6008. Mitochondria & Apoptosis. 1 Credit Hour.

This course will focus in depth on Mitochondria and Apoptosis. Topics will include: Mitochondria and Respiration; Mitochondria and Reactive Oxygen Species; Mitochondria and Apoptosis. It will provide an opportunity for a unique learning experience where the student can prepare to evaluate and design new research in the cutting-edge areas of modern cell biology and molecular biology. Instead of a didactic program of lectures, the entire course comprises a small-group format in which students interact closely with a group of faculty who have active research programs. Each week, faculty will provide students with a brief overview of the research area. Students and faculty will then jointly discuss key publications that serve to bridge the gap between the student's prior understanding of the field and the state of the art in that area.

INTD 6009. Advanced Molecular Biology. 2 Credit Hours.

This course will provide an in-depth learning experience on the fundamentals of molecular biology as well as prepare the student to evaluate and design new research in the cutting-edge areas of modern molecular biology. The course combines a didactic program of lectures along with a small- group discussion format in which students interact closely with a group of faculty who have active research programs. The course focuses on active areas of research in molecular biology: Chromatin structure, Transcription, DNA Replication and Repair, Recombination, RNA processing and regulation, Protein processing, targeting and degradation. Each week, the faculty provide students with didactic lectures on a current research area. Students and faculty then jointly discuss Key publications that serve to bridge the gap between the fundamental underpinnings of the field and the state of the art in that area.

INTD 6010. Evidence Based Dentistry. 1 Credit Hour.

Designed to help students establish an "evidence-based practice" the course will provide students the opportunity to learn the skills necessary to evaluate and select new dental products and clinical procedures. This requires an ability to read and evaluate various sources of knowledge, including articles published in the dental and medical literature, advertisements, Internet sources, and continuing education programs. Lectures and readings are designed to provide a basic understanding of clinical research, epidemiology, and statistical procedures such that dental journal articles and other sources of knowledge can be critically evaluated. The long-range goal is to prepare the student to think critically and to make sound judgments regarding the acceptance of new knowledge, products, and procedures in private practice.

INTD 6011. Introduction To Science Of Teaching. 1 Credit Hour.

This course will provide insight into the basic skills of learning and teaching. Faculty from the Academic Center for Excellence in Teaching and the Graduate School will provide the opportunity to learn the skills, strategies, and experiences for a future in academia and teaching. Topics include lecture presentations on why scientists choose to teach, planning a student learning experience in addition to developing a lecture syllabus, curriculum and teaching portfolio and philosophy. The course is recommended for Supervised Teaching Course INTD 6071.

INTD 6014. Perio/Pros/Endo/Orth Interdisciplinary Course 2. 1 Credit Hour.

This seminar brings together the residents and graduate staff from the periodontic, prosthodontic, endodontic and orthodontic postdoctoral programs to share clinically relevant multidisciplinary information. Patient diagnostic evaluations and treatment plans are evaluated in an interactive environment. Selected topics involving new advancements are presented and discussed.

INTD 6019. Pharmacotherapeutics. 1 Credit Hour.

This course is designed to review general principles of pharmacology; current and accepted pharmacotherapy for the medical management of pain, infection, and selected systemic diseases; and associated adverse drug events. It is based on the top 200 drugs dispensed by U.S. community pharmacies for the prevention, diagnosis, and/or treatment of disease with special reference to dentistry.

INTD 6033. Cell Signaling Mechanisms. 2 Credit Hours.

This course covers the molecular mechanisms of action of various extracellular mediators including hormones, neurotransmitters, growth factors, cytokines, etc., and cell signaling events. Several areas will be discussed including: (1) mechanisms of mediator synthesis; (2) interaction of mediators with specific receptors; (3) modulation by mediators of various second messenger systems including cyclic nucleotides, inositol phospholipids, calcium, protein phosphorylation, ion flux, etc.; and (4) intra- and intercellular mechanism for regulating mediator action.

INTD 6041. Basic Science Resident Lecture Series In Neurology. 1.5 Credit Hour.

This is an interdisciplinary advanced elective in which students attend 20 lectures, selected from the full offering of daily one-hour lectures comprising the Neurology Residents' Basic Sciences lecture series. These lectures cover a range of topics, such as Epilepsy, Movement Disorders, the Thalamus, Parkinson's Disease, Alzheimer's Disease, Stroke, Sleep, etc., all given from a clinical perspective. In addition, graduate students will have the opportunity to observe or participate in at least two enrichment activities related topically to the lectures they attend, which may include such settings as case presentations, diagnostic training sessions, or clinical observations, again selected from the list of offerings included in the "Neurology Residents" series.

INTD 6043. Structure & Function Of Membrane Proteins. 2 Credit Hours.

This is a course targeted at students within any of the Graduate Tracks. The objective is to provide a broad view, allowing for in depth consideration in selected areas, of the structure and diverse functions of proteins within a membrane environment. Specific topics covered will include: ion selective channels, large membrane pores, membrane transporters, membrane pumps, and membrane receptors. The format of the course will be didactic lecture followed by student presentations of relevant topics.

INTD 6045. Clinical Practicum In Neuroscience. 1 Credit Hour.

This course will provide students with a brief, but intense and very focused exposure to clinical practice in a relevant area of their choosing, designed and coordinated to best match their interests in close individual collaboration with a clinical mentor in one of the participating components: Neurosurgery, Neurology, Psychiatry, or Endodontics. Representative activities could include participation in case presentation and treatment planning, attending rounds with physicians and residents, direct observation of clinical procedures, patient interviews, follow-up care and outcome review. Potential venues may include inpatient psychiatric ward, sleep clinic, epilepsy clinic, stroke clinic, neurosurgical theater and surgical ICU. In consultation with the course director, students will first select one of the following sub-sections, then design their individually tailored clinical practicum experience with the coordinator for that section.

INTD 6070. Teaching Excellence And Academic Skills (Texas). 1 Credit Hour.

This course, designed to assist graduate students and faculty in acquiring teaching skills, is composed of four modules, each covering a range of topics from lecture and clinical teaching to instructional development to assessing student achievement.

INTD 6088. Clinic Introduction. 4.5 Credit Hours.

The informatics module, one component of this course, is a continuation from the first-year module. Students continue training on a higher level of computer use. The clinic component of the course is a series of small-group rotations for distinct clinic modules including patient assessment, periodontics, caries detection, preventive methods, sealants, pulp testing, local anesthesia, oral surgery, radiographic technique recertification, radiographic interpretation, digital photography, constructing a stabilizing appliance, patient education, infant exam, and opportunities for assisting in various clinics with the Dental School at external sites. At the end of the sophomore year, students will have had the opportunity to become well acquainted with the clinic environment and techniques for initial patient visits scheduled for the summer clinic. Professional development expectations are emphasized in the overall evaluation.

INTD 6097. Research. 0.5-12 Credit Hours.

This course is intended for first-year IMGP students only. Students will be required to attend a minimum of 10 departmental (any) seminars during the semester and submit a 100-150 word synopsis of each seminar within two weeks of the seminar.

INTD 6115. Perio/Pros/Endo/Ortho Interdisciplinary Course 3. 1 Credit Hour.

This is a seminar that brings together the residents and graduate staff from the periodontic, prosthodontic, endodontic and orthodontics postdoctoral programs to share clinically relevant multidisciplinary information. Patient diagnostic evaluations and treatment plans are evaluated in an interactive environment. Selected topics involving new advancements are presented and discussed.

INTD 7002. Neurobiology Of Learning And Memory. 1 Credit Hour.

This course will focus on recent findings and topics related to the underlying aspects of the neural basis of learning and memory. Students will have the opportunity to learn about: molecular basis of memory formation, consolidation and retrieval, memory and emotion, associative learning, memory and amnesia, and recognition memory and the medial temporal lobe. The lectures will be interactive and driven by discussions of key journal articles. Each week the first hour will be reserved for lecturing and the second hour will be reserved for a discussion of a journal article.

INTD 7003. Elective in International Medicine. 4 Credit Hours.

This elective serves as a vehicle for students to participate in international medicine rotations. Students will work with a faculty sponsor to identify a program, either a pre-established site or a site discovered by the student which requires faculty approval. This elective includes: 1) The Center for Medical Humanities and Ethics International Scholars Program in India, a competitive program requiring a separate application through the department of Medicine, 2) Shoulder to Shoulder program in Latin America, which requires a separate application process and some cost (airfare and small project fee), and is available October, January, and April, 3) Programs in Nicaragua, Mexico, Panama, and Guatemala, and 4) Other sites available through online directory: http://www.globalhealth-cc.org/GHEC/Resources/GHonline.htm. All rotations share a commitment to service learning - medical education and self-reflection that arises out of service to needy populations. Students spend up to 4 weeks (or possibly longer) living in an international site and participating in the care of patients, under the supervision of local and visiting health care providers. The clinical settings and caseload will vary based on the location. There may be opportunities for patient education and emphasis on efforts of local empowerment, aiming to build up the communities in a sustainable way. Students will be expected to integrate themselves into the health care delivery system, and when possible, to strive to make an impact through community education and home visits. For certain Latin American sites, fluency in Spanish is a prerequisite. Students are encouraged to seek similar service learning experiences with underprivileged populations in San Antonio and Border communities prior to or after the rotation. End of rotation "reflection essays" are required and will serve to process student experiences.

INTD 7005. Indian Health Care Preceptorship. 4 Credit Hours.

This elective offers the opportunity for an experience in the health care of Native Americans, coordinated through the Indian Health Service. Most experiences involve both inpatient and outpatient care under direct supervision of board certified family physicians or internists. Educational activities such as conferences, teaching rounds, etc., may vary from site to site. All clinical sites are located outside the state of Texas, including sites in New Mexico, Arizona and Alaska. Early application is recommended. Students completing appropriate application forms may be reimbursed for transportation costs and provided room and board by the Indian Health Service.

INTD 7007. Literature and Medicine. 2 Credit Hours.

In this course you are required to read short stories, poems, and a book of nonfiction. While many of the stories or poems directly address medical or ethical issues, the primary purpose is not to enhance your store of knowledge in these areas, but to promote your appreciation of these works through discussions with other students (online via Blackboard and in class) and with authors and lecturers. Your own contributions to the course - not just the insights you've gained as medical students but the wisdom you bring to the class as human beings - will be critical to its success. We hope that the readings will help you prepare for and process your clinical experiences, furthering your development as a person as well as physician. There will be no "right" or "wrong" answers in this course; rather, our goal is to encourage thoughtful and serious responses to the readings and a lively and fulfilling conversation about them and the issues they raise. Students from Christian Medical College in Vellore, India, will join in our discussion online. MSIV students will receive two credits for completion of this longitudinal elective. All students are expected to participate in class discussions. Grades are earned by reading assignments, attendance at class meetings, and posting primary and secondary responses to posted discussion questions.

INTD 7020. Clinical Patient Management. 5 Credit Hours.

This course is designed to help students develop skills in clinical behavioral dentistry through small group discussions, lectures, and routine patient treatment by application of the principles of coordinating patient care; communicating effectively with colleagues, staff, and faculty; and managing time, records, and environment. The students are required to manage their comprehensive care patients in the Junior Clinic following the principles presented in this course.

INTD 7074. Topics In Translational Medical Product Development. 1 Credit Hour.

It is crucial to understand the intricate process of translating basic research into market driven products, navigate the complex pathways of intellectual property management and the regulatory affairs of agencies such as the FDA. This course will offer students in biomedical sciences the opportunity to integrate industry-relevant training and experience with their basic science education. The course will explore the marketing and regulatory process by which a biomedical product is developed and brought to commercialization.

INTD 7091. Independent Studies. 1-9 Credit Hours.

Students will have the opportunity to use this course to study for the National Board, Part II examination, according to their own need. This course also will serve as a framework for a student returning from a leave of absence or from other protracted time away from classes or clinic. At the conclusion of the course, the enrolled student must demonstrate knowledge and/or skills and/or values consistent with the expectations for entering the level of course study from which the student left. An individualized course of study will be developed once the student is enrolled.

MEDI Courses

MEDI 3035. Medical Intensive Care Unit Elective. Credit Hours.

This elective is designed to prepare students for the challenge and responsibility of caring for highly complex patients in the intensive care unit. Students are expected to develop an advanced knowledge of the evaluation, diagnosis, and management of Internal Medicine patients with complicated illness and to prepare for the direct responsibility and professionalism required in caring for patients as a sub-intern.

MEDI 3105. Medicine Clerkship. 8 Credit Hours.

The objectives of this clinical experience are to provide opportunities for students to develop patient evaluation skills, productive self-learning techniques, a sound pathophysiological approach to medical disease, a concern and awareness for the patient's needs, and personal professional behavior. The student spends eight weeks, divided into two 4-week blocks, assigned to the inpatient General Medicine Service. An additional four weeks are spent in outpatient services. Bedside clinical teaching is emphasized by asking the student to perform patient evaluations, to contribute to the care of selected patients, and to participate in the clinical rounds of the services. During this clerkship the student receives intensive instruction from the Internal Medicine house staff and faculty. In addition, the student is expected to undertake independent patient-oriented reading and to systematically review pertinent information introduced during the preclinical years. Finally, students attend a series of clinical conferences including medical grand rounds, morbidity and mortality conferences, clinical subspecialty conferences, and organized courses in electrocardiography and nutrition. Successful completion of all required preclinical courses is prerequisite to enrollment in any of the clinical clerkships. The student spends eight weeks, divided into two 4-week blocks, assigned to the inpatient General Medicine Service. An additional four weeks are spent in outpatient services. Bedside clinical teaching is emphasized by asking the student to perform patient evaluations, to contribute to the care of selected patients, and to participate in the clinical rounds of the services. During this clerkship the student receives intensive instruction from the Internal Medicine house staff and faculty. In addition, the student is expected to undertake independent patient-oriented reading and to systematically review pertinent information introduced during the preclinical years. Finally, students attend a series of clinical conferences including medical grand rounds, morbidity and mortality conferences, clinical subspecialty conferences, and organized courses in electrocardiography and nutrition.

MEDI 4000. Special Topic. 4 Credit Hours.

This is a self-designed course created by both the student and the department to cover a specific topic. A Course Approval Form must be completed along with documentation of the designed course description.

MEDI 4002. Clinical Cardiology. 4 Credit Hours.

Students are required to participate in inpatient consultations and outpatient clinics evaluating patients with cardiovascular disease. Students are required to perform inpatient consultations at University Hospital and Audie L. Murphy V. A. Hospital. Students are required to perform appropriately focused history and physical exam, prepare written and verbal presentations, interpret laboratory data, and develop differential diagnosis and management plan on each assigned patient. Students are required to also have learning opportunities in ECG interpretation, the cardiac catheterization laboratory, and non-invasive test interpretation such as exercise treadmill testing and echocardiograms. Students must meet expectations of clinical performance and professional behavior based on School of Medicine evaluation for fourth year students to "pass" course.

MEDI 4004. Cardiovascular Research. 4 Credit Hours.

Students can participate in original research, basic or clinical, in collaboration with a faculty member of the Division of Cardiology. Students must meet expectations of research responsibilities based on School of Medicine evaluation for fourth year students to "pass" course.

MEDI 4006. Coronary Care Unit - Subinternship - VA. 4 Credit Hours.

This subinternship is designed to prepare students for the intense and responsible role of the intern. The subintern is an integral member of the team and is required to participate in all team activities and participate in all medical care for his/her patients, under the supervision of the Internal Medicine resident, Cardiology fellow, and Cardiology attending. Students are required to care for patients in the CCU and Telemetry ward. The student will be involved in the inpatient care of patients with cardiac disease, including critically ill patients needing hemodynamic and respiratory monitoring and ventilation support. Students must meet expectations of clinical performance and professional behavior based on School of Medicine evaluation for fourth year students to "pass" course.

MEDI 4007. Cardiology Care Unit Sub-Internship-SAMMC. 4 Credit Hours.

This subinternship is designed to prepare students for the intense and responsible role of the intern. The subintern is an integral member of the team and is required to participate in all team activities and participate in all medical care for his/her patients, under the supervision of the Internal Medicine resident, Cardiology fellow, and Cardiology attending. Students are required to care for patients in the CCU and Telemetry ward. The student's clinical performance will be evaluated by the supervising attending. Students are required to participate in the care of patients with a wide spectrum of acute and chronic cardiovascular problems. Emphasis is placed on mastering basic physical assessment through history and detailed cardiovascular physical examination and the interpretation of non-invasive and invasive cardiac testing. Students will have exposure to the catheterization laboratory, M-mode, 2-D, and Doppler echocardiography, color flow imaging, exercise testing, and 24-hour dynamic ECG rhythm monitoring and analysis. No late drops will be accepted. Students must meet expectations of clinical performance and professional behavior based on School of Medicine evaluation for fourth year students to "pass" course.

MEDI 4008. Clinical Endocrinology. 4 Credit Hours.

Students are required to participate in inpatient consultations and outpatient clinics evaluating patients with pituitary and hypothalamic disease, adrenal disease, diabetes mellitus, thyroid disorders, and lipid disorders. Students are required to perform inpatient consultations at Audie Murphy VA Hospital and University Hospital. Outpatients will be evaluated in weekly endocrine clinics at the VA Hospital and Texas Diabetes Institute. Students will be responsible for the initial evaluation of assigned patients, presentation of findings from the history and physical exam, interpretation of endocrine testing, and formation of differential diagnosis. If rotation is done as the Ambulatory selective, the student is required to prepare a written essay based upon specific course objectives concerning systems of care. Essays must be submitted on the last day of the rotation and are required to receive a passing grade in the course. Students must meet expectations of clinical performance and professional behavior based on School of Medicine evaluation for fourth year students to "pass" course.

MEDI 4009. Calcium & Bone Metabolism Research. 4 Credit Hours.

This research elective is recommended for students with serious research interests. It offers the opportunity to participate in ongoing projects under the supervision of division faculty. Students must meet expectations of research responsibilities based on School of Medicine evaluation for fourth year students to "pass" course.

MEDI 4010. Clinical Dermatology. 4 Credit Hours.

This elective is recommended for students with a serious interest in Dermatology, and for those intent upon further training in Internal Medicine, Family Medicine, and Pediatrics. It offers considerable clinical experience in both outpatient clinics and supervised inpatient consultations. Students rotating at UTHSCSA are required to attend teaching conferences every Wednesday (all day) and Friday afternoons. This didactic time for students and residents includes lectures, journal reviews, text reviews, and clinical Kodachrome sessions. Didactic sessions will be held separately at WHMC and BAMC. Each student is required to do a 10-minute PowerPoint presentation on a topic of choice that is both dermatology related and fits in with choice of residency. Students must meet expectations of clinical performance and professional behavior based on School of Medicine evaluation for fourth year students to "pass" course.

MEDI 4012. Clinical Endocrinology - WHMC. 4 Credit Hours.

Students will have exposure to a very active clinical endocrinology consultation service, outpatient endocrine clinic, and the performance and interpretation of diagnostic procedures in endocrinology. Students must perform appropriately focused history and physical exams, prepare written and verbal presentations, interpret laboratory data, and develop differential diagnosis and management plan on all assigned patients. Clinical performance will be evaluated by supervising attending. No late drops will be accepted. Students must meet expectations of clinical performance and professional behavior based on School of Medicine evaluation for fourth year students to "pass" course.

MEDI 4013. Clinical Epidemiology Research. 4 Credit Hours.

Students will have the opportunity to participate in ongoing epidemiological surveys in diverse populations. Topics covered include population and genetic epidemiologic studies sampling, family studies (including studies of candidate genes and systematic genome searches), design of epidemiological instruments, quality control of field operations, documentation of health outcomes, management of large data bases, and data analysis including complex segregation and linkage analysis. Students must meet expectations of research responsibilities based on School of Medicine evaluation for fourth year students to "pass" course.

MEDI 4014. Gastrointestinal Research. 4 Credit Hours.

Students are required to participate in ongoing research projects under the supervision of division faculty. Supervising faculty will complete evaluations at end of the project. Students must meet expectations of research responsibilities based on School of Medicine evaluation for fourth year students to "pass" course.

MEDI 4015. Clinical Gastroenterology. 4 Credit Hours.

Students are required to participate in inpatient consultations at Audie L. Murphy V. A. Hospital (ALMVAH) and University Hospital, outpatient clinics at ALMVAH and University Health System, and special gastrointestinal diagnostic testing under the supervision of Internal Medicine residents, GI fellows, and GI Faculty. Students are required to participate in the independent evaluation of patients with disorders of the gastrointestinal tract, pancreas, and liver. Students are required to become familiar with the application, indications, contraindications, and complications of gastroenterological procedures, as well as the proper preparation of the patient for the procedure. Students are required to perform appropriately focused history and physical exams, prepare written and verbal presentations, interpret laboratory data, and develop differential diagnosis and management plans on all assigned patients. Students must meet expectations of clinical performance and professional behavior based on School of Medicine evaluation for fourth year students to "pass" course.

MEDI 4017. Gastroenterology - SAMMC. 4 Credit Hours.

Students will be exposed to clinical gastroenterology with didactic instruction, and will work in conjunction with house staff as part of the primary care team. Students are required to perform appropriately focused history and physical exams, prepare written and verbal presentations, interpret laboratory data, and develop differential diagnosis and management plan on all assigned patients. Students will have exposure to the full range of special diagnostic procedures including observation of upper endoscopy, endoscopic ultrasound, colonoscopy, flexible sigmoidoscopy, endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP), percutaneous liver biopsy, laparoscopy, and related techniques. No late drops will be accepted. Students must meet expectations of clinical performance and professional behavior based on School of Medicine evaluation for fourth year students to "pass" course.

MEDI 4018. Clinical Hematology. 4 Credit Hours.

The consultation service includes clinical exposure to inpatient consultations, conferences, and outpatient clinics. There is opportunity for training in blood and marrow morphology, observation, and performance of special clinical and laboratory procedures. Students are responsible for the following on all assigned patients: history and physical examination, admission/progress notes, doctor's orders, interpretation of laboratory data, formation of differential diagnosis, assessment, and management plan. Students on both services are required to attend conferences including Hematology Clinical Conference, Hematology/Pathology Conference, Bone Marrow Transplant Conference, and Coagulation Conference. Students must meet expectations of clinical performance and professional behavior based on School of Medicine evaluation for fourth year students to "pass" course.

MEDI 4019. Hematology Research. 4 Credit Hours.

Students are required to participate in ongoing clinical or basic research; individual projects encouraged with written report or results required. Opportunity may be provided for combined clinical and research experience in individual cases by special arrangement. Students must meet expectations of clinical performance and professional behavior based on School of Medicine evaluation for fourth year students to "pass" course.

MEDI 4022. Infectious Disease Research. 4 Credit Hours.

For the students who wish to learn research techniques in Infectious Disease, an individual project will be designed that may involve studies of antimicrobial activity, animal models of infection, host defense mechanisms, immunologic aspects of infectious diseases, or application of molecular biology to studies of pathogens. We are prepared to teach research methodology pertinent to measurement of antigens and antibodies; and the molecular biology and immunobiology of fungal, bacterial, and chlamydia infections. Research may be directed toward in vitro work, work with laboratory animals, or direct clinical investigation. In addition, students may review local clinical experience with a given infectious disease process (e.g. tuberculosis, meningitis, amebiasis, endocarditis, etc.) with the goal of preparing a paper for publication. Students must meet expectations of research responsibilities based on School of Medicine evaluation for fourth year students to "pass" course.

MEDI 4023. Clinical Infectious Disease. 4 Credit Hours.

Infectious diseases cross all subspecialty lines, especially because antibiotics and antifungal and antiviral agents are employed widely throughout medical practice. This elective will provide practical experience in the diagnosis and management of patients with infectious diseases. There will be particular emphasis upon the pharmacology and pharmacodynamics of antimicrobial agents, selection of appropriate diagnostic tests and therapeutic agents, and the appropriate orientation of the clinician to hospital microbiology laboratories. Students are required to participate in outpatient clinics and inpatient consultations at University Hospital and Audie L Murphy V. A. Hospital and the associated clinics. Students will be responsible for the following in all assigned patients: history and physical examination, written and verbal patient presentations, interpretation of laboratory testing, participation in applicable procedures, development of differential diagnosis, assessment, and management plans. Students must meet expectations of clinical performance and professional behavior based on School of Medicine evaluation for fourth year students to "pass" course.

MEDI 4024. Infectious Disease - SAMMC. 4 Credit Hours.

The course will provide students the opportunity to obtain a broad experience in the management of infectious diseases. The spectrum of illness ranges from HIV infection to chronic osteomyelitis. Students are required to care for patients with primary infectious disease problems, or patients with major illnesses in whom an infectious complication has arisen, under the direction of the consultation resident, with supervision from the fellow and staff on the Infectious Disease Service. Students are required to perform appropriately focused history and physical exams, prepare written and verbal presentations, interpret laboratory data, and develop differential diagnosis and management plans on all assigned patients. Basic bacteriological techniques and specific techniques of bacteriological identification and sensitivity testing are reviewed. No late drops will be accepted. Students must meet expectations of clinical performance and professional behavior based on School of Medicine evaluation for fourth year students to "pass" course.

MEDI 4025. Clinical Nephrology. 4 Credit Hours.

Students are required to participate in the consultation service, outpatient clinics, conferences, acute dialysis unit, and renal biopsy program. A variety of acid-base fluid and electrolyte disorders are seen in addition to the entire spectrum of renal diseases. Student exposure to chronic dialysis and renal transplantation programs is also possible. Students perform appropriately focused history and physical exam, prepare written and verbal presentations, interpret laboratory data, and develop differential diagnosis and management plans on all assigned patients. If rotation is done as the Ambulatory Selective, the student is required to prepare a written essay based upon specific course objectives concerning systems of care. Essays must be submitted on the last day of the rotation and are required to receive a passing grade in the course. Students must meet expectations of clinical performance and professional behavior based on School of Medicine evaluation for fourth year students to "pass" course.

MEDI 4026. Nephrology Service - SAMMC. 4 Credit Hours.

The Nephrology Service offers students training and experience in the broad field of clinical nephrology. This consult rotation provides exposure to ambulatory and hospitalized patients with a variety of renal diseases including hypertension, glomerulonephritis, acute and chronic renal failure; exposure to problems of fluid, electrolyte, and acid-base disturbance. While on the service, students will be able to observe acute and chronic hemodialysis. Students are required to perform initial evaluations, including history and physicals, and will, under appropriate supervision, perform selected diagnostic procedures. A didactic lecture series, covering the broader topics of nephrology, is repeated on a monthly basis and the students are expected to attend. No late drops will be accepted. Students must meet expectations of clinical performance and professional behavior based on School of Medicine evaluation for fourth year students to "pass" course.

MEDI 4028. Renal Research. 4 Credit Hours.

Students are required to participate in ongoing research with the opportunity to learn some of the fundamental techniques of renal physiology and cell biology. Major focus of research is the role of peptide growth factors in mediating hemodynamic and metabolic events in the kidney. Independent research encouraged if student spends two or more selective periods in the laboratory. Students must meet expectations of research responsibilities based on School of Medicine evaluation for fourth year students to "pass" course.

MEDI 4034. Oncology Consultation Service. 4 Credit Hours.

The students are required to participate in the clinical activities of the Medical Oncology Section of the Division of Hematology/Oncology, with experience on the consultation service at both University Hospital and the VA Hospital, plus intensive outpatient experience in the Oncology Clinics. The inpatient consultation experience provides exposure to management of complex oncology problems. The clinic experience provides exposure to a variety of clinical medical oncology problems and their management in the outpatient setting. The student is required to become familiar with all aspects of supportive care for the oncology patient. Students are required to perform appropriately focused history and physical exams, prepare written and verbal presentations, interpret laboratory data, and develop differential diagnosis and management plans on all assigned patients. Students must meet expectations of clinical performance and professional behavior based on School of Medicine evaluation for fourth year students to "pass" course.

MEDI 4042. Coronary Intensive Care Unit - Subinternship - UH. 4 Credit Hours.

The objective of this subinternship is to prepare students for the intense and responsible role of the intern. The subintern is an integral member of the team and are required to participate in all team activities and participate in all medical care for his/her patients, under the supervision of the Internal Medicine resident, Cardiology fellow, and Cardiology attending. The student is required to become proficient in the work-up, diagnosis, and management of patients with acute myocardial infarction, acute respiratory failure, and other commonly encountered acute crises; develop expertise at arrhythmia recognition/ therapy, principles involved with airways management/mechanical ventilation. Students must meet expectations of clinical performance and professional behavior based on School of Medicine evaluation for fourth year students to "pass" course.

MEDI 4043. Clinical Chest Disease Consultation Service. 4 Credit Hours.

Students are required to work in the inpatient and outpatient settings, participating in clinics, inpatient consultations, and division conferences. Students are required to perform appropriately focused history and physical exams, prepare written and verbal presentations, interpret laboratory data, and develop differential diagnosis and management plans on all assigned patients. Students are required to actively participate in the work-up and management of patients with acute and chronic lung diseases seen by the Consultation Service and attend Pulmonary clinics at the VA Hospital and UHC-D. Students will be exposed to various diagnostic methods including radiographic, radionucleotide, bronchoscopy, and pleural biopsy techniques. Through active participation, the student should become proficient in interpreting commonly used pulmonary function tests and chest x-rays. Principles and methods involving respiratory therapy, antimicrobial therapy, and evaluation of common pulmonary disorders will be emphasized. Students must meet expectations of clinical performance and professional behavior based on School of Medicine evaluation for fourth year students to "pass" course.

MEDI 4045. Pulmonary Medicine- SAMMC. 4 Credit Hours.

Students are required to learn the recognition and treatment of acute and chronic pulmonary problems on a consult service with selection and implementation of appropriate treatment modalities. Students also are required to become familiar with pulmonary function testing to include interpretation and application of pulmonary physiology to a clinical setting. Principles of respiratory therapy will be emphasized to include the utilization of respirators and oxygen delivery systems. Clinical projects may be assigned to stress key teaching points. An active pulmonary clinic and complete pulmonary function laboratory will be available for students to gain clinical experience. No late drops will be accepted. Students must meet expectations of clinical performance and professional behavior based on School of Medicine evaluation for fourth year students to "pass" course.

MEDI 4046. General Medicine Ward Subintership-UH/VA. 4 Credit Hours.

The goal of this subinternship is to prepare students for the intense and responsible role of the intern. The subintern is an integral member of the team and is required to participate in all team activities and participate in all medical care for his/her patients, under the supervision of the Internal Medicine resident and attending. Students must meet expectations of clinical performance and professional behavior based on School of Medicine evaluation for fourth year students to "pass" course.

MEDI 4047. General Medicine Ward Subinternship-SAMMC. 4 Credit Hours.

This subinternship is designed to prepare students for the intense and responsible role of the intern. The subintern is an integral member of the team and is required to participate in all team activities and participate in all medical care for her/his patients, under the supervision of the Internal Medicine resident and attending. No late drops are accepted. Students must meet expectations of clinical performance and professional behavior based on School of Medicine evaluation for fourth year students to "pass" course.

MEDI 4048. Medical ICU Subinternship - SAMMC. 4 Credit Hours.

The goal of this subinternship is to prepare students for the intense and responsible role of the intern. The subintern is an integral member of the team and is required to participate in all team activities and participate in all medical care for his/her patients, under the supervision of the Internal Medicine resident, Critical care fellow and attending. Familiarization with pulmonary and hemodynamic physiology, as it applies to intensive care medicine, as well as the use and interpretation of data obtained from monitoring instruments, will be covered. No late drops will be accepted. Students must meet expectations of clinical performance and professional behavior based on School of Medicine evaluation for fourth year students to "pass" course.

MEDI 4049. Clinical Rheumatology. 4 Credit Hours.

The differential diagnosis and treatment of rheumatic and autoimmune diseases are taught through active student participation in outpatient clinics, consultation rounds, journal clubs, and division conferences. Students are required to evaluate patients at University Hospital, Audie Murphy VA Hospital, and UHC-D. Students are required to perform appropriately focused history and physical exams, prepare written and verbal presentations, interpret laboratory data, and develop differential diagnosis and management plans on all assigned patients. Students will also have exposure to community resources for the special problems encountered by the patients in this clinic and be able to identify different types of medical delivery systems. If rotation is done as the Ambulatory Selective, the student is required to prepare a written essay based upon specific course objectives concerning systems of care. Essays must be submitted on the last day of the rotation and are required to receive a passing grade in the course. Students must meet expectations of clinical performance and professional behavior based on School of Medicine evaluation for fourth year students to "pass" course.

MEDI 4062. Allergy-Immunology - WHMC. 4 Credit Hours.

The student will be a member of the Allergy-Immunology Ward Consult Team, along with a staff member, first-year fellow, and usually a resident. Students are required to assist in the evaluation of the inpatient consultations, and in addition see outpatients and attend all Allergy-Immunology Service educational activities. Students are required to perform appropriately focused history and physical exam, prepare written and verbal presentations, interpret laboratory data, and develop differential diagnosis and management plan on all assigned patients. No late drops will be accepted. Students must meet expectations of clinical performance and professional behavior based on School of Medicine evaluation for fourth year students to "pass" course.

MEDI 4066. Medical ICU Subinternship - UH/VA. 4 Credit Hours.

This subinternship is designed to prepare students for the intense and responsible role of the intern. The subintern is an integral member of the team and is required to participate in all team activities and participate in all medical care for his/her patients, under the supervision of the Internal Medicine resident, Pulmonary fellow, and Pulmonary/Critical care attending. Students are expected to participate in daily hospital rounds, morning report, Grand Rounds, Morbidity and Mortality conference, IM Housestaff conferences. The students are required to actively participate in the work-up and management of patients with critical illnesses under close supervision of the housestaff, fellows, and faculty. During this rotation, the student will be exposed to the fundamentals of ventilation support, airway management, respiratory and hemodynamic monitoring, stabilization and support of the critically ill patient. Emphasis is placed upon a system approach to patient evaluation and will include didactic sessions with critical care faculty in addition to daily rounds. Students must meet expectations of clinical performance and professional behavior based on School of Medicine evaluation for fourth year students to "pass" course.

MEDI 4068. Geriatric Medicine. 4 Credit Hours.

This rotation offers clinical experience in geriatric internal medicine. The student is required to participate in the Section's outpatient clinic, academic nursing home, and didactic educational activities. The student also has the opportunity for exposure to other multidisciplinary programs in geriatric medicine, including hospital-based home care. Students are required to perform appropriately focused history and physical exams, prepare written and verbal presentations, interpret laboratory data, and develop differential diagnosis and management plans on all assigned patients. Students will also have exposure to community resources for the special problems encountered by geriatric patients and have the opportunity to learn to be able to identify different types of medical delivery systems. If the rotation is done as the Ambulatory selective, the student will be required to prepare a written essay based upon specific course objectives concerning systems of care. Essays must be submitted on the last day of the rotation and are required to receive a passing grade in the course. Students must meet expectations of clinical performance and professional behavior based on School of Medicine evaluation for fourth year students to "pass" course.

MEDI 4069. Research in Aging. 4 Credit Hours.

This research elective offers the opportunity to participate in ongoing basic and clinical research on aging, including basic mechanisms of aging, nutritional modification of the aging process, gerontologic aspects of hormone action and hepatic glucose metabolism, clinical geriatric issues of long-term care interventions, ethics, and health services for the elderly under the supervision of faculty in the Department of Medicine (Division of Geriatrics) and the Department of Physiology. Students must meet expectations of research responsibilities based on School of Medicine evaluation for fourth year students to "pass" course.

MEDI 4074. AHEC Clinic Experience. 4 Credit Hours.

Under the auspices of the UT Health Science Center's South Texas Program, this experience exposes students to primary care of ambulatory patients at various clinical training sites in South, East, West, and the Coastal area of Texas. The goals are to expose you to 1) primary care, 2) community-based practice, and 3) delivery of medical care to underserved/rural populations and health disparities. Please reference the link http://southtexas.uthscsa.edu for more information. The student must spend time working in the office practice of a physician who is board certified in Internal Medicine and/or one of its specialties. In addition, the student can gain experience in preventive services applicable to infectious diseases, tuberculosis, diabetes, etc., and work with health professionals to gain a broader understanding of health care needs and services depending upon the area in which he/she is working. The student will be required to prepare a written essay based upon specific course objectives concerning systems of care. Essays must be submitted on the last day of the rotation and are required to receive a passing grade in the course. Student housing expenses may be covered by the AHEC, but there will be no reimbursement for travel costs. No late drops will be accepted. Students must meet expectations of clinical performance and professional behavior based on School of Medicine evaluation for fourth year students to "pass" course.

MEDI 4077. EKG Interpretation. 2 Credit Hours.

This rotation is designed for students who have basic to intermediate expertise in reading ECG's and who are motivated to enhance this expertise through independent study. Students have the opportunity to become proficient in the interpretation of ECG's through daily self-study of electrocardiograms. Students must meet expectations of clinical performance and professional behavior based on School of Medicine evaluation for fourth year students to "pass" course.

MEDI 4078. HIV/AIDS Inpatient Service. 4 Credit Hours.

This elective on the HIV/AIDS Medicine Team 6 at University Hospital offers the opportunity to assume direct patient responsibility under the supervision of a resident, Infectious Disease fellow, and attending faculty. This subinternship is for persons interested in obtaining extensive teaching in HIV disease. It provides practical experience in the diagnosis and treatment of HIV complications such as PCP, CMV, toxoplasmosis, invasive fungal infections, mycobacterial disease, and oncological and neurological complications of this disease. These objectives will be obtained through a team approach to patients with HIV infection involving nurses, physicians, and other staff, and also will include a formal didactic teaching series. Students must meet expectations of clinical performance and professional behavior based on School of Medicine evaluation for fourth year students to "pass" course.

MEDI 4079. Clinical Preceptorship in General Internal Medicine. 4 Credit Hours.

The student will join the practice of a clinical faculty member practicing general internal medicine in an internal medicine subspecialty in the local community. Activities include hospital rounds, office visits, hospital committee meetings, and an introduction to practice management. Students are required to perform appropriately focused history and physical exams, prepare written and verbal presentations, interpret laboratory data, and develop differential diagnosis and management plans on all assigned patients. Students will also have exposure to community resources for the special problems encountered by patients in the ambulatory setting, and be able to identify different types of medical delivery systems. If rotation is done as the Ambulatory Selective, the student will be required to prepare a written essay based upon specific course objectives concerning systems of care. Essays must be submitted on the last day of the rotation and are required to receive a passing grade in the course. Students must meet expectations of clinical performance and professional behavior based on School of Medicine evaluation for fourth year students to "pass" course.

MEDI 4084. Medicine Intensive Subinternship - RAHC. 4 Credit Hours.

This sub-internship in MICU is designed to prepare students for the intense and responsible role of the intern caring for the patients in the intensive care unit. The sub-intern is an integral member of the team and will participate in all team activities and medical care for his/her patients, under the supervision of the Internal Medicine resident and Pulmonary/Critical Care attending. Students must meet expectations of clinical performance and professional behavior based on School of Medicine evaluation for fourth year students to "pass" course.

MEDI 4085. General Medicine Ward Subinternship - RAHC. 4 Credit Hours.

This sub-internship is designed to prepare students for the intense and responsible role of the intern. The sub-intern is an integral member of the team and will participate in all team activities and medical care for his/her patients, under the supervision of the Internal Medicine resident, and will follow no more than 5 patients at any time, depending on the complexity of the patients. Students will provide comprehension patient care from admission to discharge and participate in procedures. Students must meet expectations of clinical performance and professional behavior based on School of Medicine evaluation for fourth year students to "pass" course.

MEDI 4086. Mindfulness in Medicine. 0.5 Credit Hours.

Mindfulness is important in one's personal life as well as professional work. It supports the physician in successfully caring for patients, connecting to colleagues and patients, and maintaining personal satisfaction. There is some evidence that mindfulness training in the professional development of physicians helps with effective decision making and reducing medical errors, increases sensitivity to feelings, improves attention and memory, decreases stress, and enhances reflective consideration in problem solving and decision making. Senior students are facing the formative transition to residency training, which is laden with new challenges and stressors such as work demands that conflict with emotional and physical availability for family and friends, an immense amount of new knowledge and skill to acquire, increased work hours in a complex health care system, and coping with death and the potential for errors in patient care. New interns are fearful of making mistakes that harm a patient and worry about their work-life balance. The goal of this course is to provide and apply skills in mindfulness for everyday practice so that learners are armed with the knowledge and techniques to improve their attention, renew their perspective during times of stress, build resiliency, and prevent errors and harm in their professional practice. Learning Objectives: By the end of this course, students should be able to: 1. Identify personal characteristics of leadership, bias, and resiliency and use this self-awareness to enhance professional relationships 2. Integrate techniques of mindfulness into daily life to improve attention to personal well-being, reduce stress, and avoid burnout during residency training 3. Use self-reflective writing to increase self-awareness, broaden perspectives, and cultivate empathy 4. Apply mindfulness to clinical practice to improve patient communication, recognition of error-prone situations, and quality of medical care. Course topics include: 1) Self-awareness and Resiliency; 2) Leadership, Bias, and Collaboration; 3) Mindfulness in Patient Care: Self-care and preventing medical errors; and 4) Narrative Medicine. Learning of course topics will be accomplished with a combination of self-study educational resources and assigned readings, didactic lecture, skills workshops, writing exercises, and small group discussion. Each student will be required to complete a portfolio of reflective writing and surveys, which will be used in small group discussions. To monitor the effectiveness of the course content and teaching methods, students will complete pre- and post-course surveys. Prerequisites: Completion of all core clerkships.

MEDI 4087. Point of Care Ultrasound. 4 Credit Hours.

This elective is designed to introduce students to the use of diagnostic bedside ultrasound in the care of hospitalized medicine patients, and is paired with the Internal Medicine Residency Point of Care Ultrasound Elective. In addition to review of ultrasound physics and machine controls/transducers, students will obtain knowledge and skills in image acquisition, image interpretation and pitfalls/limitations of various cardiac, pulmonary, abdominal and vascular diagnostic ultrasound applications. Other topics include clinical integration of ultrasound skills into patients with shock, cardiac arrest, respiratory failure, and volume status abnormalities. Training will be accomplished with a combination of didactic lectures, provided self-study educational resources, image acquisition skills workshops at the Center for Clinical Ultrasound Education, supervised bedside ultrasound exams of hospitalized medicine/ICU patients and independent ultrasound scanning sessions. Each student is required to complete a portfolio of ultrasound examinations covering the scope of the course material, which will be reviewed with expert faculty on a weekly basis for quality assessment, image interpretation practice and further teaching. The elective is primarily designed for students pursuing residency with an adult inpatient focus. Students must have successfully completed Internal Medicine, Family Medicine, Surgery and Emergency Medicine clerkships before taking this elective.

MEDI 4103. Hematology for the Intern. 0.5 Credit Hours.

The Advanced Hematology course will be taught using care-based discussion. The first session will be a review of red blood cell and white blood cell abnormalities. The remainder of the sessions will focus on two to three specific cases of red blood cell or white blood cell disorders. Discussion will cover differential diagnosis, appropriate laboratory studies, clinical findings, and prognosis. Discussions will include adult and pediatric cases of various types of anemia, leukemia, myeloproliferative disorders, myelodysplastic states, plasma cell disorders, and lymphoma. The pass/fail grade will be determined by attendance and participation in group discussions.

MEDI 4114. Combined Consultation Service In Geriatrics & Palliative Medicine. 0.5 Credit Hours.

This elective didactic course will introduce the basic elements of assessing a geriatric patient or a patient in need of palliative care in the in-hospital setting.

MEDI 4115. Palliative Care. 0.5 Credit Hours.

This MS4 didactic elective will focus on the main beliefs of palliative care, which include symptom control and end-of-life care in general and in specific populations, fulfilling the following educational principles, applicable to many other areas in medicine: * Communication skills instruction for medical students * Exposure to interdisciplinary teams (IDT) * Instruction in the multicultural practice of medicine.

MEDI 4120. Intermediate ECG Interpretation. 0.5 Credit Hours.

Course consists of 8 one-hour sessions. Each session will cover 5 to 15 examples of ECG teachings for discussion moderated by the instructor. Each student will be given a handout with copies of the tracings. Topics covered will include hypertrophy, atrial arrhythmia, ventricular arrhythmia, conduction abnormality, ischemia, injury, infarction, and pacemakers. Grade based on class participation.

MEDI 4121. Intermediate Bedside Cardio Exam. 0.5 Credit Hours.

Course consists of 8 one hour sessions. Each session will include demonstrations of physical findings and their elucidation in patients with cardiovascular disease. Topics covered will include brief review of cardiac cycle, characteristics of innocent murmurs, systolic murmurs, diastolic murmurs, evaluation of arterial and venous pulsations, congestive heart failure, and self assessment. Grade based on class participation.

MEDI 4150. Tropical Medicine & International Health. 0.5 Credit Hours.

Course consists of 10 contact hours and will cover topics specifically related to health in the tropics and developing world. The course will consist of an introductory lecture and nine 1 hour small group case-based discussions. Students will prepare for the small group discussions through self-initiated study of the provided syllabus and faculty will lead the case-based discussion groups. Student grades will be determined by participation in the small group discussions (50%) and a final exam (50%).

MEDI 4151. Poverty, Health, And Disease Elective. 0.5 Credit Hours.

This elective course is offered to students who wish to gain insight into the complex interplay between poverty and health, both in the United States and in resource-limited settings around the world. The purpose of the course is to expose the students to several thought leaders and appropriate published literature, including books written to address these concepts. The course will explore the problems of inequality of access to health care and its impact on health delivery systems with examples from Guatemala, Haiti, and New Orleans.

MEDI 4153. Informatics and Advanced Evidence-Based Medicine. 0.5 Credit Hours.

The course is for students who want to master information and evidence. We will use the computer lab to learn advanced skills in: 1) retrieving information, 2) storing and filing information, 3) assessing information, and 4) keeping up with new advances. The skills will include both strategies and techniques. To pass the course, students must complete a small final project that previous students have enjoyed. In their project, they will publish on Wikipedia a short, structured summary of one article for a clinical topic. I will walk you through creating the edits. The edit can be done anonymously if the student prefers. By completing the project, the students learn the goals of the course. Credit for successful completion of the course requires active participation in class activities, a minimum of 100% attendance, and successful completion of final project.

MEDI 4155. Clinical Epidemiology for the Intern. 0.5 Credit Hours.

Clinical epidemiology -- the basic science of clinical medicine that makes predictions about individual patients based on the occurrence of clinical events in groups of similar patients and using strong scientific methods to ensure that the predictions are accurate -- is especially powerful in situations of medical uncertainty. Essential concepts and methods of clinical epidemiology are presented as they pertain to obtaining answers to clinical questions and guiding clinical decision-making with the best available evidence. A case-based approach is used to illustrate the relevance of clinical epidemiological approaches to decision-making about the care of individual patients. Learning activities incorporate both didactic, small-group problem solving approaches, and procedure skills (e.g., central venous line placement, incision and drainage of abscess, lumbar puncture, and thoracentesis). Credit for successful completion of the course will be based on attendance.

MEDI 4170. Internal Medicine Internship Readiness Elective. 4 Credit Hours.

This rotation (Internal Medicine Boot Camp) is a 4-week elective restricted to students who will begin a categorical internal medicine residency in July of that same academic year. The purpose of the course is to present the diagnosis and management of common medicine topics that an IM intern can expect to encounter during residency, enhance differential diagnosis skills of common chief complaints seen on a medicine service, and develop procedural skills and patient evaluation skills. Students are expected to attend all scheduled conferences and interactive laboratory and clinical sessions focused on procedural skills and clinical assessment of standardized patients. Clinical skills labs will include heart sounds using Harvey manikin, intubation, mechanical ventilation, PFT, joint aspiration and placement of central lines. Students will receive training in BLS and ACLS and can receive certification if all classes are attended and performance is satisfactory. Students are required to give an oral presentation on a medicine topic/clinical question. Students must meet expectations of clinical performance and professional behavior based on School of Medicine evaluation for fourth year students to "pass" course.

MEDI 4201. ECG Interpretation-RAHC. 2 Credit Hours.

This rotation is designed for students whom have basic to intermediate expertise in reading ECG's and who are motivated to enhance this expertise through independent study. Students have the opportunity to become proficient in the interpretation of ECG's through daily self-study of electrocardiograms. The ECG's are referenced from the textbook: Clinical Electrocardiography - Review and Study Guide, Franklin H. Zimmerman, McGraw-Hill, 2nd ed, 2004, ISBN 0-07-142302-8. Students must meet expectations of clinical performance and professional behavior based on School of Medicine evaluation for fourth year students to "pass" course.

MEDI 4204. Geriatrics/End of Life - RAHC. 4 Credit Hours.

This rotation offers clinical experience in both geriatric medicine and palliative medicine. For the geriatric portion, the student is required to participate in the care of patients in a clinic, a nursing home, with home health agencies, and will have didactic educational activities. For the end-of-life portion, the student is required to work with professionals from different disciplines involved in a hospice-affiliated with the Harlingen teaching hospital (VBMC). Students must meet expectations of clinical performance and professional behavior based on School of Medicine evaluation for fourth year students to "pass" course.

MEDI 4206. Office Cardiology-RAHC. 4 Credit Hours.

The student will work with a cardiologist in solo or group practice and will participate in the evaluation of patients with cardiac symptoms and disease. The student will have full-time participation in clinics, consultations, ECG interpretation, non-invasive cardiac test interpretation, and possible observation in the cardiac catheterization laboratory. The student is expected to learn the pathophysiological approach to the diagnosis and management of disease of the cardiovascular system, a detailed assessment through history and detailed cardiovascular physical exam, and interpretation of diagnostic tests. If rotation is done as the Ambulatory Selective, the student is required to prepare a written essay based upon specific course objectives concerning systems of care. Essays must be submitted on the last day of the rotation and are required to receive a passing grade in the course. Students must meet expectations of clinical performance and professional behavior based on School of Medicine evaluation for fourth year students to "pass" course.

MEDI 4207. Office Endocrinology-RAHC. 4 Credit Hours.

The student will work with an endocrinologist in solo or group practice and is required to participate in the evaluation of patients with endocrine disease. The student will have full-time participation in clinics, consultations, and endocrine test interpretation. The student is expected to learn the diagnosis and management of disease of the endocrine system, patient assessment through a detailed history and physical exam, and interpretation of tests. Exposure to patients with pituitary and hypothalamic disease, thyroid disease, abnormalities in calcium metabolism, adrenal disease, diabetes, and lipid disorders may be seen. If rotation is done as the Ambulatory Selective, the student is required to prepare a written essay based upon specific course objectives concerning systems of care. Essays must be submitted t on the last day of the rotation and are required to receive a passing grade in the course. Students must meet expectations of clinical performance and professional behavior based on School of Medicine evaluation for fourth year students to "pass" course.

MEDI 4208. Office Gastroenterology-RAHC. 4 Credit Hours.

The student will work with a gastroenterologist in solo or group practice in Harlingen or in McAllen. The student is required to participate in the evaluation of patients with gastrointestinal diseases, liver disease, and diseases of the pancreas. The student will have full-time participation in clinics, consultations, and special gastrointestinal diagnostic techniques. Students are required to perform appropriately focused history and physical exams, prepare written and verbal presentations, interpret laboratory data, and develop differential diagnosis and management plans on all assigned patients. If rotation is done as the Ambulatory Selective, the student is required to prepare a written essay based upon specific course objectives concerning systems of care. Essays must be submitted on the last day of the rotation and are required to receive a passing grade in the course. Students must meet expectations of clinical performance and professional behavior based on School of Medicine evaluation for fourth year students to "pass" course.

MEDI 4209. Intermediate ECG Interpretation-RAHC. 0.5 Credit Hours.

Each session will consist of discussions of examples of ECG tracings covering topics of hypertrophy, atrial arrhythmia, ventricular arrhythmia, conduction abnormality, ischemia, injury, infarction and pacemakers.

MEDI 4210. Office General Medicine - RAHC. 4 Credit Hours.

The student will work with general internists at Su Clinica Familiar clinic and is required to participate in the evaluation of patients with common internal medicine problems. The student is required to participate full-time with a mixture of day and evening clinics. The student is required to independently evaluate patients, present findings to the attending physician, document notes in the medical record, and participate in the management discussion and any procedures related to the patient. Students will have exposure to community resources for special problems encountered by the patients in obtaining health care and be able to identify different types of medical delivery systems. The student will be required to prepare a written essay based upon specific course objectives concerning systems of care. Essays must be submitted on the last day of the rotation and are required to receive a passing grade in the course. Students must meet expectations of clinical performance and professional behavior based on School of Medicine evaluation for fourth year students to "pass" course.

MEDI 4211. Office Nephrology-RAHC. 4 Credit Hours.

The student will work with a nephrologist in a solo or group practice and are required to participate in the evaluation of patients with a variety of renal diseases including hypertension, acute and chronic renal failure, acid-base disturbances, fluid and electrolyte disturbances, and glomerular disease. The student will have full-time participation in clinics, consultations, special diagnostic procedures, and the dialysis unit. Students are required to perform appropriately focused history and physical exams, prepare written and verbal presentations, interpret laboratory data, and develop differential diagnosis and management plans on all assigned patients. If rotation is done as the Ambulatory Selective, the student is required to prepare a written essay based upon specific course objectives concerning systems of care. Essays must be submitted on the last day of the rotation and are required to receive a passing grade in the course. Students must meet expectations of clinical performance and professional behavior based on School of Medicine evaluation for fourth year students to "pass" course.

MEDI 4213. Office Pulmonary Medicine - RAHC. 4 Credit Hours.

The student will work with a pulmonologist in solo or group practice, and is required to participate in the evaluation of patients with acute and chronic lung diseases. The student will have full-time participation in clinics, inpatient hospital consultations, and various diagnostic methods. Students are required to perform appropriately focused history and physical exams, prepare written and verbal presentations, interpret laboratory data, and develop differential diagnosis and management plans on all assigned patients. The student will be expected to become proficient in the interpretation of chest x-rays, pulmonary function tests, the evaluation of common pulmonary disorders, and the principles and methods of respiratory therapy, antimicrobial therapy, and arterial blood gases. The student may also have exposure to bronchoscopy, thoracentesis, pleural biopsy, and radionucotide testing. Students must meet expectations of clinical performance and professional behavior based on School of Medicine evaluation for fourth year students to "pass" course.

MEDI 4214. Office Rheumatology-RAHC. 4 Credit Hours.

The student will have the opportunity to work with a rheumatologist in solo or group practice and is required to participate in the evaluation of patients with rheumatologic disease. The student will have full-time participation in clinics, consultations, and special diagnostic techniques. Students are required to perform appropriately focused history and physical exams, prepare written and verbal presentations, interpret laboratory data, and develop differential diagnosis and management plans on all assigned patients. The student is expected to become proficient in the differential diagnosis and treatment of rheumatic and autoimmune diseases. If rotation is done as the Ambulatory Selective, the student is required to prepare a written essay based upon specific course objectives concerning systems of care. Essays must be submitted on the last day of the rotation and are required to receive a passing grade in the course. Students must meet expectations of clinical performance and professional behavior based on School of Medicine evaluation for fourth year students to "pass" course.

MEDI 4215. Valley Aids Council-RAHC. 4 Credit Hours.

The student will have the opportunity to work in the AIDS clinic with an internal medicine physician who specialized in the care of patients with HIV disease. This rotation will provide experience in the diagnosis and treatment of HIV disease and complications such as PCP, CMV, toxoplasmosis, invasive fungal infections, mycobacterial disease, and oncological and neurological complications of HIV disease. The student will have full-time participation in clinics and consultations. Students are required to perform appropriately focused history and physical exams, prepare written and verbal presentations, interpret laboratory data, and develop differential diagnosis and management plans on all assigned patients. Students will also have exposure to community resources for the special problems encountered by the patients in this clinic and be able to identify different types of medical delivery systems. If the rotation is done as the Ambulatory Selective, the student will be required to prepare a written essay based upon specific course objectives concerning systems of care. Essays must be submitted on the last day of the rotation and are required to receive a passing grade in the course. Students must meet expectations of clinical performance and professional behavior based on School of Medicine evaluation for fourth year students to "pass" course.

MEDI 4216. Office Hematology-Oncology -RAHC. 4 Credit Hours.

The student will have the opportunity to work with a hematologist/oncologist in solo or group practice in Harlingen or in McAllen. The student is required to participate in the evaluation of patients with hematologic disease and malignancies through daily clinics, consultations, interpretation of special clinical, and laboratory procedures. Students are required to perform appropriately focused history and physical exams, prepare written and verbal presentations, interpret laboratory data, and develop differential diagnosis and management plans on all assigned patients. If rotation is done as the Ambulatory Selective, the student is required to prepare a written essay based upon specific course objectives concerning systems of care. Essays must be submitted on the last day of the rotation and are required to receive a passing grade in the course. Students must meet expectations of clinical performance and professional behavior based on School of Medicine evaluation for fourth year students to "pass" course.

MEDI 7000. Off Campus. 4 Credit Hours.

All off campus rotations must be approved by the designated faculty member prior to the beginning of the rotation (at least one week before the course begins). Credit will not be given for any rotation that has not been approved in advance. Required paperwork includes: "Course Approval" form, a written letter or email for acceptance form the physician preceptor with the start and end dates of the course/rotation, and a course description of your learning objectives and responsibilities during the rotation. Forms must include a complete address and telephone number for the off campus location or residence address for the student while at the off campus site. Forms will not be approved after the rotation has already begun. Contact the department for assistance with enrolling in this course.

MICR Courses

MICR 4000. Special Topic. 4 Credit Hours.

This is a self-designed course created by both the student and the department to cover a specific topic. A Course Approval Form must be completed along with documentation of the designed course description.

MICR 4002. Advanced Medical Microbiology. 4 Credit Hours.

This elective is available to selected fourth-year students. Responsibilities during the period would include 1) the reading of 20-25 short articles out of Morbidity & Mortality Weekly Reports (generally 5-7 pages each), so as to be prepared to 2) lead discussions as MS1 students present summaries of these articles (1 article per student in a small group setting). In addition to enriching the curriculum of the first-year class, this elective will provide the MS4 student with the opportunity to be updated on some of the most current issues of the day in areas of infectious disease.

MICR 5003. Core Concepts In Microbiology & Immunology. 4 Credit Hours.

This course will provide an integrated view of the microbial world and the mammalian immune response. Students will receive a foundation in the basic concepts and experimental approaches that are crucial for understanding core concepts in pathogenic microbiology, virology, parasitology, mycology, and immunology through directed readings and didactic instruction. A special emphasis will be placed on integrating knowledge from each discipline using specific examples to illustrate important concepts in host-pathogen interaction.

MICR 5013. Microbiology. 4 Credit Hours.

Foundation in immunology, bacteriology, virology, and mycology for all subsequent teaching of microbial pathology and oral infectious diseases is presented. Relevant aspects of preventive medicine and public health are included. Course Fees: Lab fee: $32.

MICR 5025. Eukaryotic Pathogens. 1 Credit Hour.

The course will provide students with the opportunity to gain a basic comprehensive understanding of parasitology and mycology. The first part of this course will focus on virulence mechanisms and the host immune response with respect to a variety of parasites that cause major human diseases. The second part of this course will cover several important areas of medical mycology including molecular biology, diagnostic/epidemiology, mating/phenotypic switching, morphology, pathogenesis, and antifungal therapies.

MICR 5026. Bacterial Pathogenesis. 1 Credit Hour.

This is an introductory course in microbial pathogenesis focusing on bacterial pathogens that are important in human disease. Students will receive a foundation in the basic concepts and experimental approaches that are crucial for understanding the discipline through directed readings and didactic instruction. Specific concepts, strategies, and mechanisms used by human bacterial pathogens to cause disease will be illustrated.

MICR 5027. Immunology. 1 Credit Hour.

This course will focus on fundamental concepts in immunology with emphasis on experimental strategies for elucidating the cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying immune responses. Lecture topics will illustrate important concepts in innate immunity, cytokine signaling, antigen recognition and presentation, the genetics of immune receptors and the major histocompatibility complex, immunity to infection, and immunopathology (e.g., hypersensitivity, autoimmunity, immunodeficiency, etc.).

MICR 5028. Virology. 1 Credit Hour.

This course focuses on the molecular and cellular biology of animal viruses, and their interactions with host cells. Many of the viruses to be covered in this course are medically significant or have provided critical information that has expanded our understanding of cell biology, immunology, development, and differentiation.

MICR 5029. Building Scientific Thinking Skills. 2 Credit Hours.

The goal of this course is to provide the opportunity for graduate students to develop critical thinking skills in reading scientific literature, developing/critiquing scientific ideas and grant proposals and effectively communicating one's own scientific ideas with peers. The courses will be offered in three consecutive stages. First, each student will be assigned/encouraged to read articles focusing on a topic in the areas of Microbiology and Immunology and give a 50 minute review presentation on the topic to the class followed by questions/critiques from fellow students and faculty members. Second, each student is guided to develop a mini-proposal on a chosen topic followed by written critiques from fellow students and faculty members. Finally, each student is arranged to give an oral defense of his or her written proposal to the class followed by questions from fellow students and faculty members. Since the proposal writing and defense portions mimic the process involved in M&I track qualification examination, this course will not only have a long lasting impact on the students' scientific skill development, but also help prepare the students for the immediate qualification examination.

MICR 5030. Microbiology And Immunology Track Journal Clubs. 0.5 Credit Hours.

The MI track students, together with faculty members and other researchers, will meet once a week to discuss articles on life science with an emphasis on the Microbiology and Immunology disciplines. At each meeting, an individual will present one or several papers, or a review and related materials. The presentation will be followed by questions and discussions involving everyone present at the meeting. Each meeting is scheduled for one hour.

MICR 5031. Pathogenic Microbiology. 4 Credit Hours.

This lectures-only course integrates different disciplines (immunology, cell biology, genetics, biochemistry, molecular biology, physiology, and medical microbiology) with a central theme focused on molecular mechanisms of microbial pathogenesis in man. Prerequisite: Biochemistry and Molecular Biology.

MICR 5051. Intro To Immunology. 2 Credit Hours.

This course is a study of immune responses with emphasis on experimental strategies for elucidating cellular and molecular mechanisms. Three phases of study: (1) immunochemistry and molecular biology of antibodies, lymphocyte receptors, and products of the major histocompatibility complex; (2) cellular interactions and immuno-regulation; and (3) immunopathologies (hypersensitivity, autoimmunity, immunodeficiency, transplantation rejection, and tumor immunology). Prerequisites: consent of instructor, courses in General Biology and Genetics recommended.

MICR 5090. Acquiring Presentation Skills. 1 Credit Hour.

This course is designed to prepare the student for giving a scientific lecture or seminar. Students present at least one lecture per academic year. Each student is coached and evaluated by faculty members in terms of both effective public speaking and critically analyzing scientific data. In addition, the seminars are videotaped. Students are required to attend all seminars.

MICR 5091. Current Topics In Microbiology And Immunology. 0.5-3 Credit Hours.

Students will be given an opportunity to gain in-depth understanding of selected topics in microbiology and immunology through a combination of library research and discussion with faculty. Prerequisites: consent of instructor.

MICR 5092. Special Problems. 1-9 Credit Hours.

The course provides an opportunity for the student to engage in a special research project or to develop proficiency in the use of certain laboratory methods. Prerequisites: consent of instructor.

MICR 5095. Current Topics in Immunobiology and Host-microbe Interactions. 1 Credit Hour.

This course is designed to enhance and expand on the existing Acquiring Presentation Skills (APS) course (MICR 5090) that is required of all graduate students in the Infection, Inflammation, & Immunity discipline of the IBMS Graduate Program, and the Ph.D. students of the Microbiology & Immunology Graduate Program. Although the APS course allows students to gain experience with regard to making formal lecture presentations of their research, it is limited in that students present their work only once a year, the opportunity for full discussion is limited by the time available after presentations, and being a course in which participants are exclusively students, there are no opportunities to observe examples of how skilled seasoned investigators (i.e., faculty and postdoctoral fellows) present their work. In the currently proposed course, graduate students will not only have more frequent opportunities to present their own research and receive vital feedback and critiques, but will also hear and critique presentations by more senior investigators regarding projects performed in labs throughout the Department of Microbiology & Immunology.

MICR 6022. Advanced Microbial Physiology. 2 Credit Hours.

This course consists of readings and conferences. The course includes current concepts and experimental studies in microbial structure-function relationships and regulatory mechanisms. Prerequisites: consent of instructor.

MICR 6024. Advanced Microbial Genetics. 1-4 Credit Hours.

This course consists of lectures and conferences. This course is an in-depth study of selected areas of microbial genetics, and presentation and discussion of current literature in these areas. Prerequisites: Consent of instructor.

MICR 6026. Advanced Molecular Genetics Of Eukaryotic Pathogens. 2 Credit Hours.

This course will cover the major research methods and techniques used to study human fungal pathogens.

MICR 6043. Advanced Topics In Virology. 2 Credit Hours.

This course is an in-depth study of selected topics in animal virology at the molecular level. Prerequisites: consent of instructor.

MICR 6050. Advanced Topics In Tumor Immunology. 1 Credit Hour.

This course provides an opportunity for students to gain a solid foundation in modern tumor immunology. Topics include tumor antigens, autoimmunity, mechanisms of killing, dysregulation of inflammation, and counter measures mediated by tumor to thwart or subvert host immunity.

MICR 6052. Advanced Immunobiology. 3 Credit Hours.

This course consists of lectures only. This course is an in-depth study of the immune system and how it is regulated, including presentation and discussion of current literature in these areas. Prerequisites: MICR 5051 or consent of instructor.

MICR 6071. Supervised Teaching. 1-9 Credit Hours.

This course consists of teaching under the close supervision of instructors as laboratory assistants and as leaders in tutorial or review sessions. The more advanced students may present formal lectures in the classroom or lead discussions in the laboratory. Prerequisites: consent of chair or department.

MICR 6091. Seminars In Microbiology & Immunology. 1 Credit Hour.

Presentations and discussions of recent advances in various areas of Microbiology & Immunology. Invited speakers may be from inside or outside the HSC. Each graduate student in the M&I Track is expected to register for this course each fall and each spring semester for as long as the student is enrolled in graduate school.

MICR 6097. Research. 1-12 Credit Hours.

This course consists of independent, original research under the direction of faculty advisor. May be conducted in bacteriology, virology, mycology, parasitology, and immunology.

MICR 6098. Thesis. 1-12 Credit Hours.

Registration for at least one term is required of M.S. candidates. Admission to candidacy for the Master of Science degree is required.

MICR 7099. Dissertation. 1-12 Credit Hours.

Registration for at least two terms is required of Ph.D. candidates. In addition, Ph.D. candidates may be required to complete a course in Biostatistics. Prerequisites: Admission to candidacy for the Doctor of Philosophy degree.

NEUR Courses

NEUR 3005. Neurology Core Clerkship. 4 Credit Hours.

This core clerkship is designed to give the student experience in evaluation of patients with neurologic disorders an opportunity to master the neurological exam in inpatient ward and consultation settings, as well as outpatient settings. The student will be expected to participate in the complete care of assigned General Neurology Ward patients and patients on the Stroke Specialty Wards. Students will also participate in Neurology consult rounds and have an opportunity to see consult patients. They will be assigned to either the University Hospital or VA Neurology wards/consult services for two weeks of the rotation. They will spend one week of the rotation of the Stroke wards service and participate in stroke specialty clinics during that week. One week of the rotation will be devoted to participating in a variety of general neurology and specialty clinics. Students are required to perform appropriately focused history and physical exams, prepare written and verbal presentations, interpret laboratory data and develop a differential diagnosis and management plan on all assigned patients. Students will also attend neurology morning report, the MS3 Neurology Lecture Series, selected Neurology Residency Lecture Series topics and Neurology grand Rounds. Students will receive a clinical performance evaluation by the supervising attending and residents using the SOM 3rd year medical student evaluation form.

NEUR 4002. David Sherman Academy of Teaching Neurology. 2 Credit Hours.

A longitudinal medical student elective, David Sherman Academy of Teaching Neurology, provides the foundation for learning the principles of practical clinical teaching techniques and the opportunity to create a Neurologic educational product. Teaching is a skill and this class provides students with formal training to help them excel as effective clinical teachers. The elective is longitudinal and provides 2 elective credits. There are three major objectives of this elective: (1) To gain mentored teaching experience in a variety of settings through completion of at least 10 sessions over the course of the year; (2) To complete an educational product of the student's choice that may be incorporated into the future Neurology curriculum. This product may also meet criteria for the MD in Education Distinction (see below), but this is not a requirement; (3) To complete the Distinction in Medical Education Course topics through attending the presentations and/or online video and readings. A clinical teaching didactic will be completed through http://www.med-ed.virginia.edu/courses/resasteachers/home.cfm. The student may choose to pursue the MD Distinction in Medical Education using the project designed for this elective if they also meet the following requirements: 1) Develop a measurement tool to assess the effectiveness of the educational project; 2) Submit the project for publication; 3) Display the project on a poster presentation; 4) Give a capstone presentation and reflective summary to the DIME Committee and advisors. Students completing DIME will receive project feedback and support from the DIME Committee for the development of their project. The student will also have an advisory committee with up to three people. Students who wish to achieve the distinction will need to apply by December 1st of the fourth year. After the committee reviews all projects and capstone presentations are complete, they will determine the students who have achieved distinction.

NEUR 4029. Neurology Consultation Service. 4 Credit Hours.

Students are required to perform neurological consultations both at the University Hospital and Audie L. Murphy VA Hospital. One student will be assigned to each hospital service. Attending rounds with the staff neurologist will be made daily Monday-Friday. Weekend rounds will be at the discretion to the supervising attending. Students are required to perform appropriately focused history and physical exam, prepare written and verbal presentations, interpret laboratory data, and develop differential diagnosis and management plans on all assigned patients. Students will also attend neurology morning report, neuropathology conference, neuroradiology conference, and grand rounds. Students will receive a clinical performance evaluation by the supervising attending and resident. If rotation is done as the Ambulatory Selective, the student is required to prepare a written essay based upon specific course objectives concerning systems of care. Essays must be submitted on the last day of the rotation and is required to receive a passing grade in the course. Rotation must be four consecutive weeks if done as an Ambulatory selective.

NEUR 4030. Neurology Subinternship - University Hospital & Audie Murphy VA. 4 Credit Hours.

The objective of this sub internship is to prepare students for the intense and responsible role of the intern. The sub intern is an integral member of the team and is required to participate in all team activities and participate in all medical care for her/his patients, under the supervision of the Neurology resident and attending. The student's clinical performance will be evaluated by the supervising attending and resident. The student will function as a sub-intern under the direct supervision of the Neurology resident. Considerable responsibility in the management of neurologic patients is provided on the inpatient ward services at the University Hospital and Audie L. Murphy VA Hospital. The student will work at least one weekend day and will participate in night call. The student will also spend one day each week in the adult Neurology Clinic evaluating patients with chronic neurologic problems. Attendance at daily rounds, consultation rounds, and formal conferences is expected. Students will also participate in Friday morning Neurology Grand Rounds.

NEUR 4032. Research In Neurology. 4 Credit Hours.

Several clinical and basic research projects, especially in the area of cerebral vascular disease, are being conducted in the Department of Neurology. Students may elect to work with the neurology faculty on one of these projects. This elective can be repeated depending upon the duration required for the research project. Student will receive a performance evaluation from the supervising faculty member. Discuss and arrange project through the department.

NEUR 7000. Away Rotation in Neurology. 4 Credit Hours.

All off campus rotations must be approved by the designated faculty member prior to the beginning of the rotation (at least one week before the course begins). Credit will not be given for any rotation that has not been approved in advance. Required paperwork includes: "Course Approval" form, a written letter or email of acceptance from the physical preceptor with the start and ending dates of the course/rotation, and a course description of your learning objectives and responsibilities during the rotation. Forms must include a complete address and telephone number for the off campus location or residence address for the student while at the off campus site. Forms will not be approved after the rotation has already begun.

NRSR Courses

NRSR 4010. Neurosurgery Elective. 4 Credit Hours.

Senior students function as "interns" on the neurosurgery service. They admit and discharge neurosurgery patients. They perform history and physical examinations, and keep daily records on neurosurgery patients. They follow patients in the outpatient clinics, in the emergency department, in the intensive care units, and on general wards. They participate in operations for their patients. They participate in pre and post-operative care of neurosurgery patients. They present cases, attend all conferences, and take call as designated by the neurosurgery service. They mentor third-year medical students on the neurosurgery service. They learn how to obtain a history and perform a focused neuroexamination on a patient with brain and spinal cord injury. They are encouraged to participate in basic or clinical science research projects with neurosurgical faculty.

NRSR 4035. Neurocritical Care. 4 Credit Hours.

The goal of this elective is to give students exposure to the specialty of neurocritical care. Students will act in the role of intern, taking responsibility for a minimum of 2-3 patients. They will gain knowledge in the multi-system aspect of critical care along with the unique aspects relating to patients with central nervous system disorders/injury. Students will have ample opportunity for procedures including: arterial line placement, central line placement, intubation , bronchoscopy. They will also learn about ICP 4monitors, EEG and neuroradiology. Students will be supervised by interns and neurocritical care faculty.

NRSR 7000. Off Campus Rotation In Neurosurgery. 4 Credit Hours.

All off campus rotations must be approved by the designated faculty member prior to the beginning of the rotation (at least one week before the course begins). Credit will not be given for any rotation that has not been approved in advance. Required paperwork includes: "Course Approval" form, a written letter or email for acceptance form the physician preceptor with the start and end dates of the course/rotation, and a course description of your learning objectives and responsibilities during the rotation. Forms must include a complete address and telephone number for the off campus location or residence address for the student while at the off campus site. Forms will not be approved after the rotation has already begun. Contact the Department of Neurosurgery for assistance with enrolling in this course.

OBGY Courses

OBGY 3005. Obstetric/Gynecology Clerkship. 6 Credit Hours.

A clerkship consisting of gynecology and obstetrics is provided for medical students who have successfully completed the course in reproductive physiology and pathophysiology. The goal of the clerkship is to provide students with opportunities to prepare to function as a house officer capable of providing preventive care and treatment or competent to identify the patient's need for direction into an appropriate care environment. Supervised direct patient experience occurs in the obstetrical wards, operating room, labor and delivery suite, emergency room, and the obstetrical, gynecologic, family planning, and cancer detection clinics. A guide identifying instructional goals and the mechanisms to reach them is provided. Twenty-five seminars provide the opportunity for integration of clinical experience and didactic learning. In order to enroll, students must have successfully completed all required preclinical courses.

OBGY 4000. Special Topic. 4 Credit Hours.

This course will need to be arranged with a designated faculty member(s) of the students choosing, meeting certain criteria prior to enrolling and getting permission to register. Research topics include but are not limited to PCOS, Teen Pregnancy, STD¿s, Pre-Eclampsia, Pre-Term Labor, Post Partum Depression, or any other OB/GYN related topic. The student must choose a preceptor, decide on the topic, schedule, and what will be graded. Students will follow the schedule created by that preceptor for 4 weeks.

OBGY 4001. Obstetrical Externship. 4 Credit Hours.

This selective offers training and experience in the care of complicated and normal pregnancies and exposure to advanced obstetric techniques. It is designed primarily as a preparatory subinternship for students anticipating residency in Obstetrics and Gynecology. The student will have the opportunity to be an integral member of the obstetric service and function at the junior intern level under the supervision of the Obstetric Faculty and Chief Resident. Opportunity for direct participation in labor and delivery, outpatient clinics (high risk and routine), operative obstetrics, and obstetric sonography is provided. The student is required to attend patient-care conferences and didactic teaching rounds directed by the Obstetric Faculty, and will be required to give one seminar presentation. Additional prerequisite for non-HSC students is rank in the upper half of one's medical school class.

OBGY 4007. Obstetric/Gynecology Research. 4 Credit Hours.

This selective is designed to provide the opportunity to participate in either clinical or basic research currently conducted by the faculty in the Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology. Depending on the student's interest, an appropriate faculty member will be assigned as preceptor and will integrate the student into her or his ongoing research. The student is expected to be actively involved in the research and to prepare a formal oral or written presentation relative to their area of investigation.

OBGY 4008. Reproductive Health & Gynecological Surgery. 4 Credit Hours.

This selective gives broad experience in gynecologic surgery and primary women's healthcare. It offers a direct, hands-on opportunity to develop surgical and microsurgical skills. The student is required to be an active member of the gynecology service at the subintern level under the supervision of the Faculty Preceptor and the Chief Resident. Responsibilities will include participation in: 1) inpatient gynecologic, oncologic, and urologic surgeries and medical therapies; 2) outpatient procedures such as diagnostic laparoscopy, tubal sterilization, vaginal sonography, and hysteroscopy; 3) clinic-based care including annual gynecologic and breast examination, cancer screening, contraception, and treatment of sexually transmitted diseases; 4) treatment of acute gynecologic emergencies; and 5) rounds, patient care conferences, and didactic lectures. Additionally, the student will be given 16 hours of instruction in microsurgery using an animal model.

OBGY 4009. Endo-Infertility Elective. 4 Credit Hours.

This elective offers training and experience in Reproductive and Infertility. It is designed as an advanced course for students who have completed the core clerkship in Obstetrics and Gynecology, are interested in reproductive medicine, and anticipate a residency in Obstetrics and Gynecology. The student is required to work with faculty in the Division of Reproductive Endocrinology participating in patient consultations for infertility and is required to observe ongoing management of infertility. In addition, the students are required to learn laboratory techniques associated with andrology as well as in vitro fertilization. Hands-on microsurgery laboratory experience will be available. The student is required to attend the weekly Combined Reproductive Endocrinology and Infertility Conference, be present for surgeries on the faculty service as well as on the resident service, and participate twice weekly in the infertility clinic at the Downtown University Outpatient Center.

OBGY 4010. Advanced Sonography. 4 Credit Hours.

This elective offers training and experience in Obstetric Sonography. It is designed as an advanced course for students who have completed the core clerkship in Obstetrics and Gynecology and who are interested and anticipate a residency in Obstetrics and Gynecology. The student is required to work with the faculty in the Division of Obstetrics participating in patient consultations and observe ongoing management of patients. In addition, the student will have the opportunity to obtain hands-on experience in sonography. The student is required to attend weekly Gyn Rounds and Cesarean Section Conferences.

OBGY 4011. Clin Obstetrics & Gynecology. 4 Credit Hours.

This is a four-week preceptorship in General Obstetrics and Gynecology in Harlingen, Texas. Staff are all clinical faculty of the RAHC. The clinical experience will be in both obstetrics and gynecology and involve more responsibility for patient care than is provided for third-year students; it is designed to be a subinternship. Patients are low- and high-risk obstetrical patients, general gynecology patients, GYN oncology patients, and infertility patients. Students considering a career in Obstetrics and Gynecology, Family Practice or other primary care or surgical should consider this rotation. It is a high volume, "hands-on" rotation and students have the opportunity to fulfill the required selective for ambulatory care. Housing is furnished through the Area Health Education Center/South Texas Border Initiative.

OBGY 4012. Gynecology/Oncology. 4 Credit Hours.

This selective gives focused experience in surgical techniques as well as the critical care of gynecologic oncology patients. The goal of this rotation is to provide students with the opportunities to prepare to function as a house officer capable of diagnosing and managing patients with gynecologic malignancies. Students will also have the opportunity to prepare to become competent to identify a patient's need for direction into an appropriate care environment with a gynecologic/oncologist. The student is required to be a team member of gynecologic oncology service. It is a 7-term level under the supervision of gynecology/oncology faculty preceptors and the chief resident of that service. Responsibilities include inpatient gynecologic/oncology surgeries, inpatient gynecologic/oncologic critical care, outpatient gynecologic/oncology clinic care, gynecology-radiation/oncology conference(s), and gynecologic/oncology rounds.

OBGY 4013. Ob/Gyn Bootcamp. 4 Credit Hours.

The purpose of this elective is to prepare senior medical students who are interested in a career in obstetrics and gynecology for their internship. This elective is a "bootcamp" that provides practical "hands on" surgical training and valuable experiences so students are ready to perform day 1 of their residency. Prerequisites: Students are required to have passed their required MS3 obstetrics/gynecology clerkship.

OBGY 7000. Off Campus. 4 Credit Hours.

All off campus rotations must be approved by the designated faculty member prior to the beginning of the rotation (at least one week before the course begins). Credit will not be given for any rotation that has not been approved in advance. Required paperwork includes: "Course Approval" form, a written letter or email for acceptance form the physician preceptor with the start and end dates of the course/rotation, and a course description of your learning objectives and responsibilities during the rotation. Forms must include a complete address and telephone number for the off campus location or residence address for the student while at the off campus site. Forms will not be approved after the rotation has already begun. Contact the department for assistance with enrolling in this course.

OPHT Courses

OPHT 4000. Special Topic. 4 Credit Hours.

This is a self-designed course created by both the student and the department to cover a specific topic. A Course Approval Form must be completed along with documentation of the designed course description.

OPHT 4001. Clinical Ophthalmology. 4 Credit Hours.

The goal of the senior selective experience is to help the student learn how to perform an ophthalmological examination using external examination techniques, Schiotz, and applanation tonometry, the direct and indirect ophthalmoscope, gonioscopy, and refraction, and to become familiar with the common systemic disorders that have ocular manifestations. The student is required to learn to recognize and understand the treatment of the most frequently encountered ocular diseases. Attire: Unless otherwise stated, scrubs should be worn in an operating room environment or during call hours. Under no circumstances may scrubs be worn during clinics or for any academic related activities. Exceptions may be made, but as a general rule, the student should always ask their faculty advisor before wearing any non-professional attire. Call: While this is not required, taking first ophthalmology call is highly encouraged as it is an excellent example of ophthalmology resident duties. We encourage all medical students to discuss this with their faculty mentor and a first or second year resident.

OPHT 4003. Clinical Ophthalmology Research. 4 Credit Hours.

The student is required to design and carry out a clinical project, review of literature, chart review, etc., with approval and guidance by instructor. The student also is required to participate with faculty instructors in seeing private patients, observing surgery, scheduled teaching conferences and Journal Club.

OPHT 4006. Ophthalmic Research. 4 Credit Hours.

The student is required to actively participate in research activities within the Department of Ophthalmology. The student is expected to carry out a research project, which may be clinical or involve laboratory research. A logical and step-wise approach to research will be emphasized, from literature review and collection of data to analysis and reporting of the results. Some time may also be available for exposure to clinic patients and performance of ophthalmological examinations.

OPHT 4024. MS 4 Tutoring Elective. 2 Credit Hours.

The Tutoring Elective consists of activities that will provide the student the opportunity to participate in the Office of Academic Enhancement Tutoring Program as tutors. Each tutor will receive training, tutor over an entire academic year, participate in weekly online activities, and receive a formal observation with a follow-up conference.

OPHT 4201. Clinical Ophthalmology - RAHC. 4 Credit Hours.

This course takes place in Brownsville and Weslaco, Texas. In this course, the student will work closely with the preceptor in a clinical setting. The physician can work either in private practice or a residency program setting. The physician preceptor must be board-certified in Ophthalmology and/or have a clinical faculty appointment with a LCME-Accredited Medical school. The student may not be a relative of the preceptor.

OPHT 7000. Off Campus. 4 Credit Hours.

All off campus rotations must be approved by the designated faculty member prior to the beginning of the rotation (at least one week before the course begins). Credit will not be given for any rotation that has not been approved in advance. Required paperwork includes: "Course Approval" form, a written letter or email for acceptance form the physician preceptor with the start and end dates of the course/rotation, and a course description of your learning objectives and responsibilities during the rotation. Forms must include a complete address and telephone number for the off campus location or residence address for the student while at the off campus site. Forms will not be approved after the rotation has already begun. Contact the department for assistance with enrolling in this course.

ORTO Courses

ORTO 4000. Special Topic. 4 Credit Hours.

This is a self-designed course created by both the student and the department to cover a specific topic. A Course Approval Form must be completed along with documentation of the designed course description.

ORTO 4003. Selective In Hand Surgery. 4 Credit Hours.

The student participates as a team member on the Orthopaedic Hand Surgery Service of University Hospital. The student participates in the care of acute, traumatic, and elective reconstructive problems of the hand. Principles of examination of the hand and upper extremity, as well as patient management, are taught through clinical experience and gross dissection of the upper extremity. The student is required to attend core lectures on basic orthopaedics by orthopaedic faculty. No late drops. Prerequisite: ORTO 4005.

ORTO 4005. Trauma, Fracture & Clinical Care. 4 Credit Hours.

Participate as a member of an orthopaedic elective service team (including VA) for two weeks and two weeks as a member of the orthopaedic trauma service. On the elective service, the student will be assigned to a specific resident and faculty member to work in the outpatient clinics, on wards, and in surgery. Experience will emphasize both operative and nonoperative treatment. On the trauma service, the student will be assigned to a specific resident to work in the emergency room, trauma clinics, and operating room. Broad experience in assessment and care of extremity trauma will include fracture reduction and application of plaster casts. The student is required to also attend core lectures in basic orthopaedics by faculty. Reading material includes excerpts from Essentials of Musculoskeletal Care, as well as reading material required by a particular service. No late drops.

ORTO 4006. Adult Reconstruction In Orthopaedics. 4 Credit Hours.

Assigned to the Total Joint Service. Clinic exposure includes two half days of adult reconstruction clinic: one at UT Medicine and the second at University Clinic Downtown. Students are required to learn to conduct a thorough orthopaedic examination including preoperative and post-operative evaluations. Operative experience includes two or three days per week at University Hospital, Audie L. Murphy V. A. Hospital, and Santa Rosa Northwest. Students will scrub with and assist Dr. Marshall and/or Dr. Trick in the operating room. Procedures primarily include total hip and total knee replacement and revision as well as hip and knee arthroscopy. Learning objectives will focus on basic biomechanics, anatomy, and perioperative care. Will attend core lectures on basic orthopaedics by orthopaedic faculty. Reading material includes excerpts from Essentials of Musculoskeletal Care. No late drops.

ORTO 4008. Pediatric Orthopaedics SRCH/UH. 4 Credit Hours.

Students are assigned to work with one of the pediatric orthopaedic faculty for broad exposure in the essentials in pediatric orthopaedics. Students are required to attend outpatient clinics at Christus Santa Rosa Children's Hospital, University Clinic Downtown, and University Clinic. Students are required to perform preoperative workups, attend surgery, and attend conferences at Christus Santa Rose Children's Hospital. Both assessment and treatment of pediatric trauma, congenital conditions such as clubfoot and dislocated hip, spinal disease, and neurologic conditions such as cerebral palsy will be emphasized. Students are required to attend core lectures on basic orthopaedics by orthopaedic faculty. Reading material includes excerpts from Essentials of Musculoskeletal Care, as well as reading material required by a particular service. No late drops.

ORTO 4009. Orthopaedics Research. 4 Credit Hours.

The student will be assigned to the supervision of one member of the orthopaedic faculty to carry out either a basic or clinical research project. The content and scope of the project will be determined by the student and faculty member prior to the start of the rotation. Either basic or clinical studies may be undertaken. Students are required to attend core lectures in basic orthopaedics by faculty. Reading material includes excerpts from Essentials of Musculoskeletal Care, as well as reading material required by a particular service. No late drops.

ORTO 4011. Sports Medicine Selective. 4 Credit Hours.

Students are assigned to the Sports Medicine Service. Students are required to participate in the knee rehabilitation clinic, weekly training-room visits, and attend surgeries. Introduction to the diagnosis and treatment of joint instability as well as care of the athlete will be made. Students are required to attend core lectures in basic orthopaedics by faculty. A brief review paper on a sports subject related to the student's chosen field of study, researched and submitted in rough draft, is required. Reading material includes excerpts from Essentials of Musculoskeletal Care. No late drops.

ORTO 4012. Orthopaedic Oncology. 4 Credit Hours.

Students are required to participate as a member of Orthopaedic Oncology Service. Students are required to participate in initial evaluations, staging, biopsy and definitive treatment of patients with primary musculoskeletal tumors and cancer metastatic to bone. Regional anatomy, pathology, and initial patient evaluation are emphasized. Each student is required to prepare a case presentation and discussion. Clinical experience and surgical exposure will be included. Students are required to attend core lectures in basic orthopaedics by faculty. Reading material includes excerpts from Essentials of Musculoskeletal Care, as well as reading material required by this service. No late drops.

ORTO 4014. Primary Care Orthopaedics. 4 Credit Hours.

A thorough outpatient orthopaedic primary care experience working under direct faculty supervision in Outpatient Clinics, this rotation is ideal for the student who wishes to pursue a career in Primary Care Medicine. The focus will be on common outpatient orthopaedic disease of the upper extremity, spine, and lower extremity. In addition, students will be given the opportunity to learn to assess and treat sports injuries, orthopaedic disorders of children, and in the treatment of musculoskeletal tumors. No attendance in the operating room is required. Students are required to attend core lectures in basic orthopaedics by faculty. Reading material includes excerpts from Essentials of Musculoskeletal Care. No late drops.

ORTO 7000. Off Campus. 4 Credit Hours.

All off campus rotations must be approved by the designated faculty member prior to the beginning of the rotation (at least one week before the course begins). Credit will not be given for any rotation that has not been approved in advance. Required paperwork includes: "Course Approval" form, a written letter or email for acceptance form the physician preceptor with the start and end dates of the course/rotation, and a course description of your learning objectives and responsibilities during the rotation. Forms must include a complete address and telephone number for the off campus location or residence address for the student while at the off campus site. Forms will not be approved after the rotation has already begun. Contact the department for assistance with enrolling in this course.

ORTO 7001. Orthopaedics Preceptorship. 4 Credit Hours.

Students are assigned to a practicing orthopaedic surgeon or group from the Clinical Orthopaedic Faculty, either in San Antonio or out-of-town. The student is required to see patients in the surgeon's private office, participate in the care of patients in the emergency room, and be involved in surgical cases. Rotations available include (but not limited to) preceptorships in hand surgery, sports medicine, spinal surgery, total joint replacement, pediatric orthopaedics, and general orthopaedics. A rotation description from the selected site must be turned in to the Orthopaedic Student Administrator.

OTOL Courses

OTOL 4000. Special Topic. 4 Credit Hours.

Special topics in Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery.

OTOL 4001. Head & Neck Surgery. 4 Credit Hours.

The course is a clinical experience in the outpatient, in-patient, and operative environments. The course is normally offered for those senior medical students who are interested in pursuing a career in the field, although the clinical experience is also valuable for students interested in primary care, ophthalmology, and applicable internal medicine subspecialties. The student clerk is a full participatory member of the clinical team and will gain valuable knowledge and experience in the diagnosis, medical, and surgical care of the patient with upper aerodigestive tract and related disorders. The student will have the opportunity to enhance her/his surgical technical skills, including emergency patient care. Clinical activities are available at both the University Hospital System and the VA Hospital. Clerkships at BAMC or WHAFMC are arranged through the institution's education office. Exposure to the breadth and depth of the field includes general and pediatric otolaryngology, rhinosinusology, head and neck oncologic surgery, otology, laryngology and bronchoesophagology, maxillofacial trauma, and facial plastic and reconstructive surgery.

OTOL 4002. Otorhinolaryngology Research. 4 Credit Hours.

The department offers students research opportunities in a diverse and wide range of clinical and basic science topics. Areas of on-going research include voice disorder, head and neck oncology, animal models in laryngo-tracheal stenosis, and clinical outcomes studies. New opportunities for research are present in the functional areas of otolaryngology and hearing science, head and neck surgery, laryngology, general otolaryngology, and facial plastic and reconstructive surgery.

OTOL 7000. Off Campus. 4 Credit Hours.

All off campus rotations must be approved by the designated faculty member prior to the beginning of the rotation (at least one week before the course begins). Credit will not be given for any rotation that has not been approved in advance. Required paperwork includes: "Course Approval" form, a written letter or email for acceptance form the physician preceptor with the start and end dates of the course/rotation, and a course description of your learning objectives and responsibilities during the rotation. Forms must include a complete address and telephone number for the off campus location or residence address for the student while at the off campus site. Forms will not be approved after the rotation has already begun. Contact the department for assistance with enrolling in this course.

PATH Courses

PATH 4001. Hematology - University Hospital. 4 Credit Hours.

During this selective, through daily experience, consultations, and conferences, students will have the opportunity to learn to use CBCs, blood films, bone marrow studies, and other hematologic laboratory data in the diagnosis of basic hematologic, lymphoid, and coagulation disorders. This selective can be tailored according to the needs of individual students. The student interested in primary care can become involved in the performance of common laboratory tests done in the office. Daily contact with the pathologist will provide guidance in selection and proper utilization of laboratory testing for a specific patient's problem. For the student interested in pathology and laboratory medicine, the organization, management, maintenance of quality control, and consultative role of the Hematology Laboratory will be emphasized. During the selective period, a student may be assigned to spend one week in flow cytometry, molecular genetics, or cytogenetics.

PATH 4002. Blood Banking. 4 Credit Hours.

This selective is to acquaint the student with transfusion practices including the indications, dosage, expected benefits and risks of the different blood components, and the performance of therapeutic apheresis. The student will also be exposed to basic immuno-hematology and blood-banking techniques of acquiring, processing, testing, and transfusing blood components. Under the direction of the pathologist, a transfusion medicine fellow, a pathology resident, and a technical specialist in blood banking, the student will be required to perform basic techniques, participate in resolving the problems of patients having difficulties in transfusion, and evaluate the appropriateness of transfusion episodes. The selective can be tailored to offer more experience in transfusion practices for patient care or in organization, management, quality control, and other factors important to the student who may consider laboratory medicine as a chosen field. Students are required to participate in consultations and education programs offered by the blood bank.

PATH 4003. Hematology/Blood Banking. 4 Credit Hours.

This combination selective between the Hematology Laboratory and the Blood Bank may be arranged if student so desires.

PATH 4007. Pathology Research. 4 Credit Hours.

The course involves participation in a selected facet of ongoing research projects being conducted by a faculty member with assigned responsibilities for technical performance, reading, and interpretation of results.

PATH 4012. Anatomic Pathology: Fine Needle Aspiration. 4 Credit Hours.

Students will be given the opportunity to learn the technique of fine needle aspiration (FNA) biopsy. Direct supervision by faculty, cytology fellow and/or pathology resident in the method of specimen procurement and preparation of the FNA specimen occurs after initial instruction by the course director or their designee for palpable lesions. Participation at radiologically guided or endoscopically guided FNAs is also observed. Students are required to learn basic Modified-Giemsa staining with preliminary evaluation for adequacy of aspirate. There will be exposure to basic interpretation of FNA material from smears and cell blocks with emphasis on selection of ancillary testing along with clinical correlation. A separate clinic time is NO longer available and FNAs are done on an "on-call" basis from UHS cytopathology. Exposure to other areas of anatomic pathology that pertain to quality improvement of clinical medicine skills will also be made available. The experience may be customized depending on the student's future interests (pathology as a future vocation versus students planning on other fields of medicine).

PATH 4015. Forensic Pathology. 2 Credit Hours.

Daily responsibilities include the observation of forensic autopsies. Other responsibilities will include crime scene investigation, courtroom, and/or deposition exposure. During the rotation period, the student is expected to spend some time within the toxicology laboratory and must arrange this with the chief toxicologist. Near the end of the rotation, the student is expected to present a talk on a topic of current forensic interest to the staff during weekly case review. The student will be assessed by attendance, type and frequency of activities performed, and subjective evaluations by the medical examiner staff. This forensic pathology rotation must be pre-approved by the course director for both time period and length of rotation; recommended during the fourth year of medical school following core rotation in general autopsy and surgical pathology, though those rotations are not required.

PATH 4104. Naturopathic Medicine: Evidence-Based Critique. 0.5 Credit Hours.

This course strives to overcome the animosity between conventional and unconventional medicine by openly discussing and evaluating some of the naturopathic methods using the tools of evidence-based medicine. The objective of this course is to build basic knowledge about the mainstreams of naturopathic medicine such as fito-therapy, acupuncture and other reflexologies, Asian and European dietary systems, as well as stimulatory methods such as fasting and homeopathy. For each of these systems, diagnosis and treatment will be discussed from the evidence-based perspective.

PATH 4105. Evidence Based Medicine In Everyday Practice. 0.5 Credit Hours.

This course includes theory and methodological foundation, definitions and overview of evidence-based medicine, practical considerations, and reporting in evidence-based medicine.

PATH 4290. Clinically Applied Laboratory Medicine (CALM). 0.5 Credit Hours.

This course is an eleven-contact-hour mandatory course in laboratory medicine for MSIV students. Offered during the spring semester, the course is taught by members of the Pathology Department using patient case scenarios to illustrate laboratory medicine aspects of patient care management. An introductory one-hour lecture is presented to the entire class as a whole to provide course format information and small-group assignments. Groups of twenty-five to thirty students are formed based upon medical/surgical specialties; a student is assigned to a group according to chosen specialty. Patient cases are selected to emphasize important laboratory medicine points pertinent to a particular specialty.

PATH 5021. Biostatistics. 3 Credit Hours.

An introduction to Biostatistics, emphasis is upon application of statistical methods to biological problems. Topics include descriptive statistics, probability, hypothesis testing, and estimation.

PATH 5025. Individual Study In Biometry. 1-9 Credit Hours.

This course is for students who wish to study special problems in biometry or application of biometric methods to problems in the life sciences. A plan of study is determined by the student and the biometry faculty with topics varying according to the interests and requirements of the student.

PATH 5030. Oral Histopathology. 1 Credit Hour.

The course will review the histopathologic features of oral diseases. Cases signed-out on the Oral & Maxillofacial Pathology Biopsy Service will be discussed in a conference format utilizing a multiheaded microscope. Correlation of the histologic findings with the clinical and radiographic presentation of oral disease processes will be emphasized. Students will have the opportunity to learn the basis of surgical pathologic diagnosis and related ancillary special studies.

PATH 5035. Oral Pathology. 2 Credit Hours.

Clinicopathologic correlations, differential diagnosis, and therapeutic rationale are emphasized. The integration of history, physical findings, and clinical laboratory data with pertinent radiographic findings, clinical presentations, and anatomic pathology will be emphasized.

PATH 6019. General Pathology. 5 Credit Hours.

The fundamentals of human pathology, with emphasis on practical clinical applications, are presented. Lectures, independent study, and laboratory experiences are used in a review of the principal diseases of major organ systems. Course fees: Lab fee Microscope fee: $48.

PATH 6021. Oral Pathology 1. 4 Credit Hours.

This didactic course introduces the basic pathological changes that occur in oral tissue. Lectures are supplemented by Kodachrome® illustrations with emphasis placed upon histoclinical correlation.

PATH 6026. Surgical Oral Pathology 1. 1 Credit Hour.

This course is presented in the first semester and consists of 16 one-hour sessions of instruction conducted as case conferences utilizing radiographic, histopathologic, and clinical projected glass slides and Kodachromes. Students present assigned literature reviews and cases emphasizing radiographic and histopathologic changes; discussions follow. Students include those from Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Periodontics, Endodontics, and Dental Diagnostic Sciences.

PATH 6027. Surgical Oral Pathology 2. 1 Credit Hour.

This course is a continuation of PATH 6026 Surgical Oral Pathology 1. It is presented in the second semester and consists of 17 one-hour sessions of instruction conducted as case conferences utilizing radiographic, histopathologic, and clinical projected glass slides and Kodachromes. Students present assigned literature reviews and cases emphasizing radiographic and histopathologic changes; discussions follow. Students include those from Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Periodontics, Endodontics, and Dental Diagnostic Sciences.

PATH 7000. Off Campus. 4 Credit Hours.

All off campus rotations must be approved by the designated faculty member prior to the beginning of the rotation (at least one week before the course begins). Credit will not be given for any rotation that has not been approved in advance. Required paperwork includes: "Course Approval" form, a written letter or email for acceptance form the physician preceptor with the start and end dates of the course/rotation, and a course description of your learning objectives and responsibilities during the rotation. Forms must include a complete address and telephone number for the off campus location or residence address for the student while at the off campus site. Forms will not be approved after the rotation has already begun. Contact the department for assistance with enrolling in this course.

PATH 7023. Oral & Maxillofacial Pathology: Clinicopathologic Conference. 1 Credit Hour.

This course is a series of 14 clinicopathologic conferences presented in an interactive case-based/clinical problem-solving format. Students will be expected to apply their fund of basic science knowledge learned in the prerequisite didactic pathology courses to simulated dental practice situations. Cases will be discussed systematically utilizing the S.O.A.P. format (Subjective, Objective, Assessment, Plan). Students are required to complete and turn in a worksheet and self assessment for each case. Students are expected to read articles from current scientific literature posted on the course Blackboard Web site and take the online challenge examinations. Lectures on the critical topics of head and neck cancer and skin cancer will be given by the course director.

PEDI Courses

PEDI 3005. Pediatrics Clerkship. 6 Credit Hours.

This third-year pediatric clerkship addresses issues unique to childhood and adolescence by focusing on human developmental biology, and by emphasizing the impact of family, community, and society on child health and well-being. Additionally, the clerkship focuses on the impact of disease and its treatment on the developing human, and emphasizes growth and development, principles of health supervision, and recognition of common health problems. The role of the pediatrician in prevention of disease and injury and the importance of collaboration between the pediatrician and other health professionals in stressed. During this clerkship, students spend time working in outpatient and inpatient settings.

PEDI 4000. Special Topic. 4 Credit Hours.

This is a self-designed course created by both the student and the department to cover a specific topic. A Course Approval Form must be completed along with documentation of the designed course description.

PEDI 4003. General Pediatrics Selective. 4 Credit Hours.

The goal of the General Pediatrics Selective is to teach medical students the knowledge and skills to understand human growth and development and its clinical application from infancy through adolescence; to take a complete, accurate, and culturally-sensitive history from children and their families; and to perform complete and problem-focused physical examinations of infants, children and adolescents for common acute and chronic pediatric illnesses. Students will communicate effectively in written and oral form with physicians, patient families, and clinic staff; describe the influence of family, community, and society on child health and disease; incorporate strategies for health promotion and injury prevention into patient care; and refer to and coordinate care with sub-specialists and community agencies. Students will interpret common radiologic studies and perform office-based diagnostic tests and minor procedures. Students will interpret common radiologic studies and perform office-based diagnostic tests and minor procedures. Students will be expected to demonstrate professional responsibility in working as a team member with other members of the General Pediatrics team, patients, and families. Students work Monday-Friday with faculty and residents in an academic clinic primarily in the acute care setting.

PEDI 4006. Pediatric Cardiology. 4 Credit Hours.

The goal of the Pediatric Cardiology Selective is to improve the student's understanding of the pathophysiology and management of pediatric and congenital heart diseases. Clinical skills in cardiac auscultation, EKG interpretation, and chest x-ray interpretation will be emphasized primarily in the outpatient setting. The student will observe noninvasive techniques in diagnosis such as echocardiography and invasive procedures in the cardiac catheterization laboratory. The student will participate in didactic instruction and online materials to improve knowledge and skills. The student is expected to research a cardiology topic during the rotation, and give a presentation on findings to the group at the end of the rotation. Student learning will be further enhanced by participation in weekly multidisciplinary patient management conferences. The student will be expected to demonstrate professional responsibility in working as a team member with other members of the Pediatric Cardiology care team, patients, and families.

PEDI 4009. Pediatric Gastroenterology/Nutrition. 4 Credit Hours.

The goal of the Pediatric Gastroenterology Selective is to increase the knowledge and skills of students in the diagnosis and management of gastrointestinal, liver, and nutritional disorders of children. Clinical teaching activity takes place in the inpatient setting, with opportunities to follow patients in the outpatient setting. The student will actively participate in evaluating and managing patients including observing endoscopy and other procedures if necessary. Required reading and discussion of study material with faculty will be expected. The student will participate in didactic sessions to enhance learning of common diagnoses. The student will be expected to demonstrate professional responsibility in working as a team member with other members of the Pediatric Gastroenterology team, patients, and families.

PEDI 4013. Pediatric Hematology/Oncology. 4 Credit Hours.

The goal of the Pediatric Hematology/Oncology Selective is to develop knowledge and skills in diagnostic evaluation, therapy, and follow-up of hematology/oncology patients. Clinical activities will take place primarily in the outpatient setting. This is an opportunity for experience in blood and bone marrow morphological diagnosis, in techniques for bone marrow aspiration, and in administration of intravenous and intrathecal chemotherapy. The student will work with a multidisciplinary team to meet the complex psychosocial needs of this patient population. The student is expected to demonstrate professional responsibility in working as a team member with other members of the Pediatric Hematology/Oncology team, patients, and families.

PEDI 4015. Pediatric Hematology/Oncology Research. 4 Credit Hours.

Previous experience with introductory adult or pediatric hematology/oncology courses preferred. The student will participate in a clinical or basic investigation project on a topic of interest to the student under the supervision of the medical staff. The research might utilize retrospective information on specific groups of patients treated at the Children's Cancer Research and Treatment Center, the Hematology Clinic, or the Bone Marrow Transplant Unit; or it may investigate in-depth a particular clinical or basic facet of a disease process.

PEDI 4016. Pediatric Allergy, Immunology, And Infectious Diseases. 4 Credit Hours.

The goal of this Selective is to develop student skills in clinical and laboratory evaluation of hypersensitivity, infection, immunity, and inflammation, and in the management of allergic disease, infectious disease, primary and secondary immune deficiencies, rheumatologic conditions, and associated complicated complications. The scope of infectious diseases typically encountered includes community and hospital acquired infections, including post-surgical infections, infections in cancer and transplant patients, and HIV-infected children. The student will participate in outpatient clinics and inpatient consultations. The student will spend time in the laboratory covering bacteriology, virology, mycology, flow cytometry, and HLA typing. Scheduled conferences include weekly Case Management which will include presentation of patient cases to the faculty and care team. The student is expected to research a pertinent topic during the rotation and give a presentation on findings to the group at the end of the rotation. The student is expected to demonstrate professional responsibility in working as a team member with other members of the Pediatric infectious Disease, Allergy, and Immunology teams, patients, and families.

PEDI 4018. Child Neurology. 4 Credit Hours.

The goal of the Child Neurology Selective is to develop the knowledge and skills to evaluate and manage children with neurologic disorders. The student will distinguish normal from abnormal neurologic development; perform a skillful neurologic history and exam to distinguish normal from abnormal findings, peripheral from central nervous system lesions, and static from progressive neurologic dysfunction; identify temporary vs. chronic progressive neurological dysfunction; and recognize and manage neurological disorders that generally require referral. Students will be able to discuss the indications, side effects, and mode of action of commonly used medications in pediatric neurology; the indications for complex or expensive neurologic testing; and the pediatrician's role in prevention of neurologic disorders in children. Patient activity is primarily in the outpatient setting, but students will participate in consultations and care of select inpatients. Students are expected to demonstrate professional responsibility in working as a team members of the Pediatric Neurology care team, patient, and families.

PEDI 4020. Pediatric Endocrinology. 4 Credit Hours.

The goal of the Pediatric Endocrinology Selective is to develop the knowledge and skills needed to diagnose and manage disorders of thyroid/parathyroid, adrenal/gonad, growth (including hypopituitarism), and carbohydrate metabolism (including diabetes mellitus). Most patient care activity occurs in the outpatient setting with clinics focused on either diabetes (type 1, type 2, medial diabetes) or endocrine issues. Students will explain how to use a glucometer and insulin pump and how to perform growth and puberty stimulation tests. Directed reading is provided, and the patients are reviewed and the pertinent literature discussed at regularly scheduled conferences. Each student will present one interesting case at a weekly Case Conference. Students are expected to demonstrate professional responsibility in working as a team member with other members of the Pediatric Endocrinology team, patients, and families.

PEDI 4022. Neonatal Research. 4 Credit Hours.

This rotation is designed for students interested in laboratory or clinical research experience in Perinatal Medicine. The student will work directly under the guidance of a faculty member and be involved in data gathering, chart review, or lab work in the area of research in which the faculty is involved and commensurate with the student's experience and interests. The selective will provide opportunities for protocol development, literature review, data analysis, and learning through reading and student-faculty interaction. Students must arrange to work with a neonatal faculty member before contacting the department for permission.

PEDI 4023. Neonatology. 4 Credit Hours.

The goal of Neonatology Selective is to gain the knowledge and skills needed to evaluate and manage preterm and term infants requiring intensive care. Students will work neonatologists and their staff in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit and participate as a member of the neonatal response team in attending high-risk deliveries and admitting babies to the NICU. All aspects of the medical and nursing care of the high-risk or fragile newborn will be open to the student for study. The student is expected to function at the level of a sub-intern. The student will also be encouraged to participate in the support and instruction of families and gain understanding of "life beyond the NICU" for these special babies. The preceptor will guide the student in selecting appropriate reading to enhance the experiential component of the selective. The student is expected to demonstrate professional responsibility in working as a team member with other members of the neonatal team, patients and families. Weekend and night call schedules are integrated with those of the pediatric house staff. Students will work 6 days/week with 1 day off. As the 4th weekend is off, this translates to 3 days off during the rotation. These 3 days may be used for interviews; additional days off for interviewing should not be expected.

PEDI 4027. Pediatric Genetics. 4 Credit Hours.

The goal of the Pediatric Genetics Selective is to develop student knowledge and skills in diagnosing and developing management plans for children with single gene disorders, chromosome abnormalities, multiple congenital anomalies, metabolic disorders, teratogenic exposures, developmental delay, intellectual disability, and autism. Most patient activity is in the outpatient setting, but students will participate in inpatient consultations. Patient encounters range from 45 minutes to 2 hours in length depending on the patient and the chief concerns. Students will participate in multidisciplinary clinics, including craniofacial anomalies clinic. Training in differential diagnosis includes use of online genetics databases and resources. Students are expected to demonstrate professional responsibility in working as a team member with other members of the Genetics team, patients, and families.

PEDI 4029. Pediatric Pulmonology. 4 Credit Hours.

The goal of the Pediatric Pulmonary Selective is to develop the knowledge and skills needed to diagnose and manage common pediatric pulmonary disorders. The emphasis will be on how to obtain pertinent history, the recognition of physical signs of pulmonary diseases, CXR, and blood gas evaluation, and the critical assessment of the data gathered. Students will participate in outpatient pulmonary clinics, including cystic fibrosis and asthma clinics, and will follow pediatric inpatients with pulmonary disorders. The practice of evidence-based medicine will be emphasized. Regularly scheduled didactic sessions will expand on topics encountered in patient care. Students are expected to demonstrate professional responsibility in working as a team member with other members of the Pulmonary team, patients, and families.

PEDI 4031. Pediatric Nephrology. 4 Credit Hours.

The goal of the Pediatric Nephrology Selective is to develop skills in diagnosis and management of common renal disorders in children as well as significant participation in the management of dialysis and kidney transplant patients. The student will learn the essential concepts in the pathophysiology and management of fluid and electrolytes and acid base disturbances. Most patient care activity occurs in the outpatient setting, but students will also participate in the management of inpatients. The student will learn histopathology of renal diseases through reviewing biopsies with pathologists. The student is expected to demonstrate professional responsibility in working as a team member with other members of the Renal team, patients, and families.

PEDI 4036. Pediatric Critical Care. 4 Credit Hours.

The goal of the Pediatric Critical Care Selective is to develop the skills needed to evaluate and manage critically ill infants and children with medical and surgical diagnoses. The student will actively participate in a multidisciplinary team in the Pediatric Intensive Care Unit. Students will enhance their knowledge and skills in invasive procedures, principles of mechanical ventilation, principles of resuscitation, pharmacology of critical care, and the pathophysiology of these diseases. The student will serve as a sub-intern, participating in daily rounds with the attending pediatric faculty. Directed reading and didactic materials will be provided. The student is expected to demonstrate professional responsibility in working as a team member with other members of the Critical care team, patients, and families.

PEDI 4039. Child Abuse Pediatrics. 4 Credit Hours.

The goal of the Child Abuse Pediatric Selective is to increase the student's awareness that maltreatment is a common cause of many acute, delayed, and chronic physical and mental health conditions. The student will recognize demographic risk factors, but will see child abuse as a medical diagnosis made by the history and physical examination. The student will learn the history and physical exam necessary to evaluate concerns for injury and neglect and document in the correct medico-legal format. The student will learn the reporting mandate, and know how to report to the appropriate agency(s). The student will understand that abuse and neglect have immediate, short term, intermediate term, and long term effects that extend out into adulthood. Most patient care activity occurs in the outpatient setting, but the student may participate in emergency room and inpatient consults. The student will participate in staffing with CPS and other investigators and may have the opportunity to observe court hearings. The student is expected to demonstrate professional responsibility in working as a team member with other members of the Child Abuse Pediatrics team, CPS investigators, patients, and families.

PEDI 4040. Inpatient Pediatrics. 4 Credit Hours.

The goal of the Inpatient Pediatrics Selective is to prepare the student for pediatric inpatient wards during residency by enhancing knowledge and skills needed to evaluate and manage basic inpatient pediatric diseases as well as improving clinical skills such as oral and written case presentation, physical examination, hand-offs, and incorporating evidence-based medicine into clinical practice. The student will demonstrate knowledge of procedure skills including but not limited to conscious sedation, incision and drainage, and lumbar puncture. The student will function at the level of a sub-intern. The student will participate in the care of inpatients, small-group didactics, an online clinical reasoning skills module, and various organized educational activities. The student will also be expected to spend two weeks in nursery focused on teaching 3rd year medicals students and the evaluation and management of newborns. The portion of the rotation spend on the inpatient floor will require flexibility in scheduling with some night softs possible given the current variability in patient volume. The student will demonstrate professional responsibility in working as a team member with other members of the Inpatient Pediatrics team, patients, and families and recognize the importance of working as a highly-effective team to deliver safe, efficient, care. Students must have completed all core clerkships.

PEDI 4074. Ahec Clinic Experience. 4 Credit Hours.

The goal of the AHEC Clinic Experience Elective are to provide medical students with the knowledge and skills to understand human growth and development and its clinical application from infancy through adolescence; take a complete, accurate, and culturally-sensitive history from children and their families; and perform complete and problem-focused physical examinations of infants, children and adolescents for common acute and chronic pediatric illnesses. The student will interpret common radiologic studies and perform office-based diagnostic tests. Under the auspices of the UTHSCSA AHEC Program, this experience exposes students to the primary care of ambulatory patients at various AHEC clinical training sites in South Texas. Under the direct supervision of a Board Certified General Pediatrician, the student serves as the initial physician in the evaluation and management of a wide array of outpatient problems. This clinic experience may include associated inpatient experience, depending on the patient responsibilities of the physician. The student will be expected to demonstrate professional responsibility in working as a team member with other members of the pediatric team, patient and families. Information about training sites may be found on the AHEC websites: http://www.uthscsa.edu/cstp/index.aspx. Student must first receive permission from the Department of Pediatrics before contacting the AHEC Office (567-7819). Application must be made 6-8 weeks in advance of the date on which you want to start the rotation. Once the rotation is confirmed by the AHEC Office, the student will be given electric permission to go online and register for the course. On or before the first day of the rotation, the student will need to meet with Administrative Associate at the Center of South Texas Programs/AHEC Office (567-7819).

PEDI 4100. Nutrition Readiness For Internship. 0.5 Credit Hours.

This course will consist of four two-hour sessions that cover a variety of clinically oriented discussions and practical points of value to new interns. Topics are modified annually to cater for every year participants' areas of interest and upcoming internship. Reading material about topics of discussion will be distributed to students to review before the class to insure maximal participation in team based learning style. Topics to be covered: nutritional care of the surgical patient and TPN, nutrition in pregnancy, nutrition in special situations such as brain injury, encephalopathy, renal and liver disease, enteral nutrition and nutritional rehabilitation in growth and intestinal failure in short bowel patients.

PEDI 4201. Community Pediatrics-RAHC. 4 Credit Hours.

The Department of Pediatrics offers this 4-week rotation at the RAHC Division for students interested in the contextual and systemic dimensions of general pediatrics. Goals for this rotation are 1) To experience and gain an understanding of the social, cultural, economic, and family forces which impact the health status of children in the Lower Rio Grande Valley, 2) to experience and gain an understanding of how the financing and organization of the health care system succeeds or fails to deliver optimal care to children and families 3) to experience and gain an understanding of the community roles of the pediatricians- as a member of the health care team and as an advocate for children. Students will work with pediatricians in community practices. In addition to clinical work with patients, students will participate in business meetings of the practices, work with other members of the health care team (such as nurse practitioners, physicians assistants, and social workers), and participate with physicians in their hospital and other agency committee duties. Sites for this rotation will include a variety of pediatric offices, including community health centers and private practices.

PEDI 4204. Pediatric Neurology-RAHC. 4 Credit Hours.

The goal of the Pediatric Neurology Selective is to develop the knowledge and skills to evaluate and manage children with neurologic disorders. The student will distinguish normal from abnormal neurologic development; perform a skillful neurologic history and exam to distinguish normal from abnormal findings, peripheral from central nervous system lesions, and static from progressive neurologic dysfunction; identify temporary vs. chronic progressive neurological dysfunction; and recognize and manage neurological disorders that generally require referral. The student will be able to discuss the indications, side effects, and mode of action of commonly used medications in pediatric neurology; the indications for complex or expensive neurologic testing; and the pediatrician's role in prevention of neurologic disorders in children. The student will work with a pediatric neurologist in the community setting. The student will see patients with the neurologist in the office and visit local hospitals in response to requests for consultation. The preceptor will guide the student in selecting appropriate reading to enhance the experiential component of the selective. The student is expected to demonstrate professional responsibility in working as a team member with other members of the Pediatric Neurology care team, patients, and families. Facility in Spanish is desirable but not essential.

PEDI 4205. Evidence Based Pediatrics-RAHC. 2 Credit Hours.

The student will explore the ways in which the EMB process is used in clinical practice through assigned readings and clinical experience. The student will spend mornings in an ambulatory care practice. From each morning's clinical experience, the student will identify one or two clinical questions. In the afternoons, the student will work in the medical library to formulate an answerable question, develop a search strategy, locate relevant literature, select a journal article, evaluate the article using EBM formulas, and reach a conclusion about the clinical questions. The preceptor will review the findings with student in clinic the following morning. Culmination of the experience will be a case presentation in an appropriate forum such as a journal club or rounds.

PEDI 4206. Pediatric Cardiology-RAHC. 4 Credit Hours.

The goal of the Pediatric Cardiology Selective is to improve the students understanding of the pathophysiology and management of pediatric and congenital heart diseases. Clinical skills in cardiac auscultation, EKG interpretation, and chest x-ray interpretation, and chest x-ray interpretation will be emphasized primarily in the outpatient setting. The student will observe noninvasive techniques in diagnosis such as echocardiography. The student will work with pediatric cardiologists in the private practice setting. The student will see patients with the cardiologists in their office, and visit local hospitals with them as they respond to requests for consultation. Since many of the cardiac disorders managed in this practice are chronic in nature, the student will learn how children and their families cope with these conditions at home, in school and in the community at large. Preceptors will guide the student in selecting appropriate reading to enhance the experiential component of the selective. The student is expected to demonstrate professional responsibility in working as a team member with other members of the Pediatric Cardiology care team, patients, and families.

PEDI 4207. Neonatology - RAHC. 4 Credit Hours.

The goal of the Neonatology Selective is to gain the knowledge and skills needed to evaluate and manage preterm and term infants. The student will work with neonatologists and their staff in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit. The student will participate as a member of the neonatal response team in attending high-risk or fragile newborn will be open to the student for study. All aspects of the medical and nursing care of the high-risk or fragile newborn will be open to the student for study. The student will also be encouraged to participate in the support and instruction of families to gain understanding of "life beyond the NICU" for these special babies. The preceptor will guide the student in selecting appropriate reading to enhance the experiential component of the selective. The student is expected to demonstrate professional responsibility in working as a team member with other members of the Neonatal team, patients, and families.

PEDI 4208. Pediatric Critical Care-RAHC. 4 Credit Hours.

The goal of the Pediatric Critical Care Selective is to develop the skills needed to evaluate and manage critically ill infants and children with medical and surgical diagnoses. Students will enhance their knowledge and skills in invasive procedures, principles of mechanical ventilation, principles of resuscitation, pharmacology of critical care and the pathophysiology of these diseases. The student will participate in daily rounds with the attending pediatric faculty. Directed readying and didactic materials will be provided. Students are expected to demonstrate professional responsibility in working as a team member with other members of the critical care team, patients and families.

PEDI 4209. Pediatric Gastroenterology - RAHC. 4 Credit Hours.

The goal of the Pediatric Gastroenterology Selective is to increase the knowledge and skills of students in diagnosis and management of gastrointestinal, liver, and nutritional disorders of children. The student will work with a pediatric gastroenterologist in the community setting. The student will see patients with the gastroenterologist in the office, and visit local hospitals in response to requests for consultation. The gastroenterologist's practice includes a broad array of children with gastrointestinal problems, including digestive and malabsorptive disorders, short-gut syndrome, congenital anomalies, cystic fibrosis, recurrent infections, inflammatory bowel disease, and failure to thrive. The student will gain clinical skills in interviewing, physical assessment, the use and interpretation of imaging studies, and the indications for and interpretation of endoscopic assessments. In addition, the student will learn how the gastroenterologist, as a specialist-consultant, interacts with referring physicians and agencies. Since many of the gastrointestinal disorders are chronic in nature, the student will learn how children and their families cope with these conditions at home, in school, and in the community at large. The preceptor will guide the student in selecting appropriate reading to enhance the experiential component of the elective. The student may have an opportunity to complete a small research project during the elective. The student will demonstrate professional responsibility in working as a team member with other members of the Pediatric Gastroenterology team, patients, and families. Facility in Spanish is desirable but not essential.

PEDI 4210. Pediatric Inpatient Service - RAHC (Valley Baptist Medical Center - Harlingen). 4 Credit Hours.

The goal of the Inpatient Pediatrics Selective is to prepare the student for pediatric inpatient wards during residency by enhancing knowledge of basic inpatient pediatric diseases as well as improving clinical skills such as oral and written case presentation, physical examination, hand-offs, and incorporating evidence-based medicine into clinical practice. The student will function at the level of a sub-intern. All clinical activity occurs on the inpatient unit.

PEDI 4425. Community for Children at the Border and Beyond. 4 Credit Hours.

This is a four-week elective rotation in International Children's Health and Community Pediatrics located in the Lower Rio Grande Valley. The purpose is to educate future physicians to provide compassionate, effective international leadership within community collaborations addressing children's rights and the social determinants of health in resource-poor communities and to provide opportunities to develop skills necessary for effective advocacy. Curriculum objectives include: rights of the child; social determinants; clinical care in resource-poor regions; the impact of poverty; immigration and violence; preparing for advocacy; fostering a culture of compassion and professional development through experiences that broaden a physician-in-training's view of health and illness. Objectives are address through didactics provided at the UTHSCSA RAHC, community outreach, advocacy projects, and individualized professional development counseling and goal setting. The elective also includes individually tailored Spanish classes and fieldwork with promotoras, community leaders, public health officials, and families. Advocacy is a large component of this elective. The participants work with community-based organizations on selected advocacy issues, such as child refugees and immigration, obesity and diabetes among the young, and medical-legal interventions for children and their families. Participants explore the sources of health, disease, and healing and examine models of public health and medical care on both sides of the border. Community for Children is not a clinical course, although there are opportunities to participate in patient care in clinics and hospitals, including home visits. CFC directors mentor participants during the rotation and beyond, providing tools and support for professional development. This elective is a signature program of the UTHSCSA Regional Academic Health Center's Community Medicine Educational Cooperative, in partnership with the UTHSCSA Department of Pediatrics, UT Health Science Center-Houston School of Public Health-Brownsville, Brownsville Community Health Center, Harlingen Pediatrics Associates, Hospital Infantil de Tamaulipas/Ciudad Victoria, Mexico, and Centro de Salud Tamaulipas, Mexico.

PEDI 7000. Off Campus. 4 Credit Hours.

All off campus rotations must be approved by the designated faculty member prior to the beginning of the rotation (at least one week before the course begins). Credit will not be given for any rotation that has not been approved in advance. Required paperwork includes: "Course Approval" form, a written letter or email for acceptance form the physician preceptor with the start and end dates of the course/rotation, and a course description of your learning objectives and responsibilities during the rotation. Forms must include a complete address and telephone number for the off campus location or residence address for the student while at the off campus site. Forms will not be approved after the rotation has already begun. Contact the department for assistance with enrolling in this course.

PEDI 7002. Pediatric Developmental Disabilities. 4 Credit Hours.

The goal of the Pediatric Developmental Disabilities Elective is to develop the knowledge and skills needed to asses and interpret findings of developmental-behavioral assessments, understand the neurological and genetic work-up, and become familiar with community resources for special needs children. The student will have the opportunity to participate in the developmental, neurological, and genetic evaluation of children with developmental-behavioral disabilities. Common developmental-behavioral disabilities encountered in this rotation may include Autism Spectrum Disorders, Attention-Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder, Global Developmental Delay, Intellectual Disability (formerly Mental Retardation), Learning Disabilities, Neural Tube Defects, and Cerebral Palsy. Patient care activity takes place in the outpatient setting. Students will also participate in key community site visits. In addition to core didactic sessions, students will have independent readings that complement their clinical activities. For electives occurring in June, July and August, the student will spend 1 week at Camp CAMP (Children's Association for Maximum Potential), a summer camp in the Texas Hill Country for children with a variety of disabilities. (All expenses are paid). Medical Students will be part of a medical team responsible for daily medical management of a "tribe" of children. The student must complete paperwork as required by Camp CAMP before attending.

PEDI 7012. Pediatric Community Preceptorship. 4 Credit Hours.

The goal of the Pediatric Community Preceptorship is to provide medical students with knowledge and skills to diagnose and manage patients found in the preceptor's practice; to understand the social, cultural, economic, and family forces which impact on the health status of children; and understand the community roles of the pediatrician, as a member of the health care team, and as an advocate for children. Students will actively participate in patient care in the office practice of board-certified pediatrician preceptors. Preceptorships are available with general pediatricians or with subspecialists. Preceptorship experience must be scheduled well in advance and may be 2 or 4 weeks in length, students must arrange to work with a preceptor before contacting the department for permission. All preceptors must have an adjunct faculty appointment with a medical school.

PHAR Courses

PHAR 4000. Special Topic. 1-42 Credit Hours.

This is a self-designed course created by both the student and the department to cover a specific topic. A Course Approval Form must be completed along with documentation of the designed course description.

PHAR 4003. Clinical Pharmacology. 4 Credit Hours.

This selective is an essential course in Drug Prescribing and Therapeutics for future interns in any specialty. It is an excellent opportunity to brush up on drug therapy before entering residency and to avoid causing harm to the patients through mis-prescription of drugs. The drugs of the major therapeutic areas and how they are used are reviewed by specialists from the Departments of Medicine, Psychiatry, Surgery, and Pharmacology. Particular emphasis is placed on the use of drugs in clinical scenarios.

PHAR 5001. Pharmacology. 4 Credit Hours.

This course is a study of the general principles of action of drugs used for the treatment and alleviation of symptoms of medical and dental diseases including pharmacodynamics of major drug groups, toxicology, and contemporary prescription writing.

PHAR 5013. Principles Of Pharmacology & Physiology 1. 3 Credit Hours.

Topics include principles of drug action; receptor classification and quantitation; dose response relationships; cellular mechanisms of drug action; fundamental concepts of drug receptor interactions; voltage gated and ion channels; drug actions mediate by transduction and non-transduction enzymes; time course of drug action; absorption, distribution, biotransformation and elimination of drugs; pharmacokinetics; and experimental approaches to drug action.

PHAR 5014. Integrative Physiology & Therapeutics. 4.5 Credit Hours.

This course provides students with a base of knowledge in physiology and pharmacology taking an integrative approach to understanding experimental and clinical therapeutics. Primary focus will be on understanding normal physiologic functions, cellular mechanism underlying disease, and systematic consideration of the pharmacology, clinical applications, and toxicities of the major classes of drugs. This required 4.5 credit hour course for Pharmacology and Physiology students is comprised of three sections, each covering major areas of physiology and pharmacology along with their corresponding therapeutics. The three sections include: 1) 0.5-credit hour of autonomic nervous system control and therapeutics, 2) 2-credit hour of cardiovascular, renal and respiratory physiology and therapeutics, and 3) 2-credit hour of metabolism, hormones, GI physiology and therapeutics. Each section will also be offered separately as an independent micro-elective for students from other programs within the Graduate School of Biomedical Science. Prerequisites: IBMS 5000.

PHAR 5018. Cardiovascular, Renal and Respiratory Physiology and Therapeutics. 2 Credit Hours.

This course covers the anatomy, physiology and pharmacology of the heart, the blood vessels, kidneys, and airways and lungs. Specific areas include: 1) normal physiology of the cardiovascular system and mechanisms underlying its major pathologies such as atherosclerosis, hypertension, heart failure and stroke, as well as the major classes of drugs (antihypertensives, anti-lipemics, anti-anginals, and anticoagulants) to treat these primary cardiovascular disorders. 2) importance of the kidneys in maintaining body electrolyte and water balance, and examples of cardiovascular and kidney diseases that are targets for important therapeutic drugs such as the diuretics and ACE inhibitors. 3) respiratory physiology and drugs used in the treatment of asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Prerequisites: INTD 5000 or equivalent.

PHAR 5019. Metabolism, Hormones, GI Physiology and Therapeutics. 2 Credit Hours.

This course provides an overview of the following: 1) physiology of major endocrine systems, including pituitary, thyroid, GI and renal hormones, etc. It covers endocrine regulation of stress, blood sugar, male and female fertility, calcium balance, growth, pregnancy, and appetite. Pharmacological approaches to management of diseases caused by defects in metabolism (e.g. diabetes) and hormonal regulation (e.g. thyroid disorders), as well as sex steroids and adrenal steroids, will be discussed. 2) mechanisms and regulation of digestion/acid secretion and nutrient absorption by the GI tract along with pharmacological management of GI diseases, including GERD, peptic, ulcer, etc. Prerequisites: INTD 5000 or equivalent.

PHAR 5020. Basics Of Research Design. 2 Credit Hours.

This course aims at teaching first-year graduate students fundamentals of research design and analysis of scientific literature to orient them with setting up scientific experiments and writing grant proposals. The course is divided into three sections: research design, communicating scientific data, and getting scientific ideas funded.

PHAR 5021. Autonomic Control & Therapeutics. 0.5 Credit Hours.

This course covers basic anatomy, physiology and pharmacology of the autonomic nervous system, including its higher order CNS components of the ANS in the regulation of homeostasis. Diseases that involve alterations in ANS function and drugs that modulate catecholaminergic and cholinergic neuro-effector transmission will be discussed.

PHAR 5090. Seminar. 1-9 Credit Hours.

This course consists of presentation and discussion of recent advances in research by staff faculty, students, and outside scientists. A monthly journal club that emphasizes student presentations of current primary literature is also a component.

PHAR 5091. Special Topics: Microelectives. 0.5-9 Credit Hours.

Micro-electives are courses that can be of any type (tutorial or original literature review, short [2-week] didactic, technique, etc.). In general, since they are short, they are often offered at any time of convenience between the student(s) and the faculty. Various topics include but not limited to: (1) New Views on Monoaminergic Neurotransmission: Are Transporters Important?; (2) Drug Discovery: Nuts and Bolts; (3) Historical Perspectives of Receptor Theory; (4) Cell Membrane Microdomains and Signaling; (5) Neuropeptide Metabolism; (6) Serotonin: From Soup (Transmission) to Nuts (Behavior); (7) Central-Cardio-Respiratory Systems; (8) Neural Substrates of Regulatory Behaviors: Peptides and Monoamines; (9) Current Issues in Basic Research on Mechanisms of Epilepsy; (10) Appetite Control: Adiposity Hormones and Neuropeptides; (11)Fundamentals of Behavioral Pharmacology; (12) Therapeutics: Autonomic Pharmacology; (13) Therapeutics: Cardiovascular-Renal Pharmacology (Prerequisite: PHAR 5091.012); (14) Therapeutics: Central Nervous System Pharmacotherapeutics; (15) Therapeutics: Chemotherapy: (16) Therapeutics: Endocrine Pharmacology: (17) Therapeutics: Pharmacological Management of Pain; and (18) G protein-coupled receptor heteromers.

PHAR 5092. Special Problems In Pharmacology: Research Practicum. 1-9 Credit Hours.

This is a full-semester research experience for the principal investigator to evaluate if a student demonstrates the potential for productive and independent investigation during the summer following the first year. The course concludes with a 15 minute oral presentation given by the student and a written report in a journal style.

PHAR 6015. Effects, Power, Meta-Analysis. 1 Credit Hour.

Evaluating the statistical significance of research findings requires knowledge of statistics, but additional skills are needed to evaluate their importance. This course introduces tools that help answer three questions: 1) How do I assess the practical or everyday significance of my research results, 2) Does my study have sufficient power to find what I am seeking, and 3) How do I draw conclusions from past studies reporting disparate results. Answering these questions involves estimation of effect size, calculation of statistical power, and pooling of individual effect size estimates by meta-analysis. This course discusses these activities together, because they are interrelated. A well-designed study is normally based on a prospective power analysis, and a good power analysis will ideally be based on a meta-analytically derived mean effect size. There is a growing recognition by scientific journals and funding agencies of the need to report effect sizes along with the results of test of statistical significance and to quantify the statistical power of studies. The aim of this course is to help acquire the skills necessary to meet these needs. Prerequisites: CSBL 5095.

PHAR 6020. Molecular & Pharmacological Basis Of Therapeutics. 3 Credit Hours.

This course provides the graduate student with current knowledge of how genetic variants can affect drug response and the potential to optimize drug therapy. Course format will include lectures, discussion of selected literature, individual student presentations, and the opportunity for the development of a mini pharmacogenetic/genomic protocol and consent form to address a clinical/biomedical question mutually agreed upon between course director and students.

PHAR 6025. Molecular Pharmacology. 2 Credit Hours.

This course will be presented in a journal club/paper discussion format and will focus on the molecular aspects of pharmacology, with emphasis on molecular biology, biochemistry, and cell biology of a variety of physiological systems subjected to pharmacological manipulation. The topics to be discussed will include molecular mechanisms of drug action, signal transduction and regulation, molecular approaches, and recent advances in areas of molecular pharmacology.

PHAR 6027. Fundamentals Of Neuroethics. 1 Credit Hour.

Recent advances in neuroscience have considerably improved our understanding of brain function. However, the fascinating examination of brain's mysteries often intersects with the concerns of ethics and public policy. This course aims at presenting and discussing philosophical and scientific perspectives on major bioethical issues pertinent to neuroscience research. Several subjects will be covered in the course, including the effects of pharmacological and surgical interventions on the brain/min binomial, therapy versus enhancement, brain imaging and mental privacy, neurobiology of decision making, consciousness, unconsciousness, and death.

PHAR 6071. Supervised Teaching. 1-9 Credit Hours.

This course provides a mentored teaching experience. The student will be responsible for directing an undergraduate Physiology laboratory course under the guidance of the Physiology faculty. The student will prepare and provide limited lectures addressing background information required to understanding and performing research laboratories, as well as direct undergraduates in performance of these laboratories. Physiology faculty will insure that graduate students are prepared and knowledgeable about the laboratories they will direct. In addition, students will receive training in general pedagogue and specifically, in the performance, conduct, and directing of physiology research and its dissemination. In addition to learning to direct a laboratory course and providing lecture-based information, graduate students will be trained in preparing, administering, and marking laboratory exams.

PHAR 6097. Research. 0.5-12 Credit Hours.

Independent, original research under the direction of a faculty advisor.

PHAR 6098. Thesis. 1-12 Credit Hours.

Registration for at least one term is a Graduate School requirement for all MS candidates.

PHAR 7002. Bridging The Gap From Bench To Bedside: Pharmacology Clinical Practicum. 1 Credit Hour.

Pharmacology is the most basic of the science disciplines to bridge the gap between "bench and bedside." This micro-elective will provide students with focused exposure to therapeutics and clinical practice. The course will incorporate case-based, operating room scenarios using human simulator mannequins, with a clinical experience in association with the Department of Anesthesiology. Students must directly contact the course director before registering for this course.

PHAR 7003. Electrophysiology In Neuroscience Research. 1 Credit Hour.

The purpose of this course is to explore the rationale underlying the use of electrophysiological techniques in neuroscience research. Rather than focusing on the technical aspects of electrophysiology, this course will discuss current hot topic manuscripts that utilize different electrophysiological approaches including in vivo (anesthetized and conscious), in vitro, extracellular (single-unit and field potential), intracellular and patch. It is anticipated that at the end of the course students will be more familiar with the area of electrophysiology and able to understand why particular approaches are utilized in neuroscience research and be able to critically review electrophysiological data from manuscripts.

PHAR 7099. Dissertation. 1-12 Credit Hours.

Registration for at least two terms is a Graduate School requirement for all Ph.D. candidates. Prerequisites: admission to candidacy for Doctor of Philosophy degree.

PHAR 8009. Pharmacotherapeutics. 2 Credit Hours.

The emphasis of this course is on understanding the rationale, indications, and contraindications for prescribing pharmacologic agents in dentistry. Consideration of the pharmacologic agents that the patient may be taking at the time of the dental visit is emphasized.

PHYL Courses

PHYL 3014. Research in Endocrinology of Aging. Credit Hours.

The course consists of student participation in research on glucocorticoid-induced gene expression during aging and food restriction.

PHYL 3016. Ion Channel Research. Credit Hours.

The course includes student participation in ongoing basic research on the molecular mechanisms of signaling pathways acting on ion channels. Techniques may include patch-clamp, electrophysiology, molecular biology and biochemistry.

PHYL 4000. Special Topic. 1-42 Credit Hours.

This is a self-designed course created by both the student and the department to cover a specific topic. A Course Approval Form must be completed along with documentation of the designed course description.

PHYL 4012. Molecular Endocrinology Research. 4 Credit Hours.

The course consists of student participation in research on glucocorticoid-induced gene expression during aging and food restriction.

PHYL 4016. Ion Channel Research. 4 Credit Hours.

The course includes student participation in ongoing basic research on the molecular mechanisms of signaling pathways acting on ion channels. Techniques may include patch-clamp, electrophysiology, molecular biology and biochemistry.

PHYL 5013. Dental Physiology. 6.5 Credit Hours.

Lecture instruction in the basic concepts of cell and organ function and in the integrated function of mammalian organ systems is presented. The physiology of the nervous system is included. (Students may elect to substitute CSBL 5019 - Gross Human Anatomy for Graduate Students for this course.).

PHYL 5017. Discovery Of Physiological Principles 3. 2 Credit Hours.

This course consists of laboratory demonstrations and experiments in areas covered in Organ Systems Physiology 2 and acquisition of skills for analyzing and communicating the results of laboratory research. Corequisites: PHYL 5025.

PHYL 5025. Organ Systems Physiology 2. 4 Credit Hours.

This course is a continuation of the study, begun in Organ System Physiology 1, of the mechanisms that produce and control the functions of the body's organ system. Prerequisites: PHYL 5011, PHYL 5014, PHYL 5021, and PHYL 5024.

PHYL 5041. Excitable Membranes. 1 Credit Hour.

This course addresses fundamental mechanisms of cell excitability in neurons and other excitable tissues. The format is a combination of lectures, readings, discussions, a laboratory demonstration, and online simulations (where available). Examples of the latter include activities to simulate the resting membrane potential and action potentials. The module will emphasize contemporary issues in the scientific literature as well as translational science where dysfunction in ion channels underlie common disorders such as Alzheimer's Disease, Myasthenia Gravis, Cystic Fibrosis, Long QT Syndrome, and Epilepsy to name just a few. PHYL 5041 is a co-requisite for Fundamentals of Neuroscience I as it is the first module of that course, but it also can be taken as a standalone one-hour course.

PHYL 5042. Cardiovascular Physiology. 1 Credit Hour.

This course explores the physiological mechanisms by which the cardiovascular system carries out its principle function. Mechanisms that produce and regulate cardiac pumping, organ blood flow, capillary fluid and solute exchange, and arterial blood pressure are examined. The nature and importance of various local, neural, and hormonal mechanisms are emphasized. Integrated control of cardiovascular function in situations requiring cardiovascular adjustments (e.g., exercise, blood pressure alterations) are also covered. Students may take the full series but are only required to take three out of the four courses (PHYL 5041, 5042, 5043, and 5044).

PHYL 5043. Respiratory & Renal Physiology. 1 Credit Hour.

This course covers the physiology of respiratory and renal function in the human body. Our focus is on basic mechanisms of function, role in body homeostasis, as well as dysfunction of both systems associated with pulmonary and renal disease. Two sessions are set aside for discussion around significant advances in each field. One or more recently published articles will serve as the focus for each of these discussions sessions. Students may take the full series but are only required to take three out of the four courses (PHYL 5041, 5042, 5043, and 5044).

PHYL 5044. Metabolism/Hormones/GI System. 1 Credit Hour.

The course serves to expose students to the current state of knowledge in the field of endocrinology and metabolism, including reproductive physiology, and the related topics of the physiology of the digestive tract. Three sessions are assigned to advanced topics. In these three sessions students will engage in a discussion format centered around one recent important publication. The lecturer will lead the discussion with the aim of showing how the topics the students have been exposed to integrate one with another, providing the context for present-day discoveries.

PHYL 5045. Mammalian Physiology. 4 Credit Hours.

The course begins with fundamental processes that govern membrane transport, membrane potential, and excitation-contraction coupling. The course then proceeds to coverage of organ system function including cardiovascular, respiratory, renal, gastrointestinal and endocrine/metabolic physiology. Lecture material is enhanced by supplemental discussion of research literature encompassing molecular biology, integrative function, and pathophysiological implications. Students may take the full course but are only required to take three out of the four modules (PHYL 5041, 5042, 5043, and 5044).

PHYL 6020. Regulation of Glucose Metaboli. 3 Credit Hours.

The normal regulation of glucose metabolism will be reviewed integrating whole body, organ, cellular, and molecular control mechanisms. Dysregulation of these control mechanisms in diabetes and other common metabolic disorders such as obesity and the metabolic syndrome will be examined in detail. State of-the-art in vivo and in vitro techniques essential for the study of normal and deranged glucose homeostasis will be discussed in depth. Diabetic microvascular (nephropathy, retinopathy, neuropathy) and macrovascular complications and their relationship to impaired glucose metabolism will be reviewed. Lastly, pharmacologic therapy of diabetes and its associated complications will be discussed.

PHYL 6071. Supervised Teaching. 1 Credit Hour.

A student enrolled in this course is expected to participate in the teaching program of the Department.

PHYL 6090. Seminar. 1 Credit Hour.

The course is comprised of research presentations by Physiology graduate students. This course is required of all students each semester.

PHYL 6091. Selected Topics Of Physiology. 2 Credit Hours.

Students must take a least two courses selected from among the offerings in:(1) Cardiovascular; (2) Cell Biology in Neural Science; (3) Endocrine and Metabolism; (4) Molecular Physiology; and (5) Ion Channels in Disease. Courses that may be substituted for one of these selections: (1) INTD 5040 - Fundamentals of Neuroscience I: Molecular, Cellular, and Developmental Neuroscience; (2) INTD 5043 - Fundamentals of Neuroscience II: Systems Neuroscience; (3) CSBL 6048 - Biology of Aging; and (4) CSBL 6058 - Neurobiology of Aging. Not all selected topics are offered each semester. Please discuss this with the Academic Coordinator for more details. Substituted courses in conflict with Physiology course schedule will require approval from COGS.

PHYL 6097. Research. 1-12 Credit Hours.

If a track chooses to give a seminar course, the specific course requirements will be determined by the track. The sub-designations for each track are: (1)Biology of Aging; (2) Cancer Biology; (3) Cell & Molecular Biology; (4) Genetics, Genomics & Development; (5) Membrane Biology & Cell Signaling; (6) Metabolism & Metabolic Disorders; (7) Microbiology & Immunology; (8)Molecular Biophysics & Biochemistry; (9) Molecular, Cellular, & Integrative Physiology; (10) Neuroscience; and (11) Pharmacology.

PHYL 6098. Thesis. 1-12 Credit Hours.

Registration for at least one term is required of M.S. candidates. Prerequisite: admission to candidacy for Master of Science degree.

PHYL 6291. Seminar 2. 1 Credit Hour.

Presentation and discussion of recent research advances by outside scientists.

PHYL 7000. Off Campus. 1-42 Credit Hours.

All off campus rotations must be approved by the designated faculty member prior to the beginning of the rotation (at least one week before the course begins). Credit will not be given for any rotation that has not been approved in advance. Required paperwork includes: "Course Approval" form, a written letter or email for acceptance form the physician preceptor with the start and end dates of the course/rotation, and a course description of your learning objectives and responsibilities during the rotation. Forms must include a complete address and telephone number for the off campus location or residence address for the student while at the off campus site. Forms will not be approved after the rotation has already begun. Contact the department for assistance with enrolling in this course.

PHYL 7099. Dissertation. 1-12 Credit Hours.

Registration for at least two terms is required of Ph.D. candidates. Prerequisites: admission to candidacy for the Ph.D. degree.

PSYC Courses

PSYC 3005. Psychiatry Clerkship. 6 Credit Hours.

The psychiatric clinical clerkship is designed to familiarize the student with the personality traits, illnesses, and emotional disturbances that affect health and productivity. It is an opportunity for the student to develop and strengthen clinical skills in interviewing patients, formulating treatment plans, and carrying out treatment with patients who have psychiatric illness. The clerkship is arranged so the student may select the assignment area on the basis of particular interest, i.e., an inpatient/outpatient setting. The student's role in the clerkship is arranged to allow for considerable experience in the working relationship between patient and "physician" in the treatment process. Seminars have been developed to allow the student an in-depth appreciation of the various psychiatric states and emotional problems that affect the general practice of medicine. The student-staff ratio allows for small groups of students to meet with faculty, thereby enhancing learning. The clerkship is an opportunity for the students to look at their personal feelings and values and understand how they influence patient care, to learn how to deal with psychiatric disease, and to become more comfortable in dealing with the personalities of patients with organic disease. Prerequisites: Successful completion of all required preclinical courses is prerequisite to enrollment in any of the clinical clerkships.

PSYC 4000. Special Topic. 4 Credit Hours.

This is a self-designed course created by both the student and the department to cover a specific topic. A Course Approval Form must be completed along with documentation of the designed course description.

PSYC 4001. Clinical Psychiatry. 4 Credit Hours.

The fourth-year medical student inpatient rotation is designed as a bridge between the role of third-year clerk and the very active, responsible role of the intern. The fourth-year medical student will act as the primary psychiatrist under the supervision of a full-time attending. The student will be an integral member of the team, and will participate in all team activities. All activities for this experience will be on an inpatient psychiatric service at the University Hospital, Veterans' Administration Hospital, both in San Antonio or the Rio Grande State Center in Harlingen. These are busy units with brief lengths of stay. The student will have the opportunity to gain considerable experience with crisis management of serious mental illness as well as an understanding of acute exacerbations of chronic mental illness.

PSYC 4008. Clinical Biological Psyc Research. 4 Credit Hours.

The course includes participation in clinical research into biochemical disturbances in mood disorders, mechanism of drug actions, and clinical testing of experimental drugs in depression, ADHD, schizophrenia, and anxiety.

PSYC 4015. Neuropsychiatry - VA Hosp. 4 Credit Hours.

This rotation will introduce students to an appreciation of the correlation between brain dysfunction and behavior disorders. Students will have the opportunity to learn how to clinically evaluate patients for cognitive dysfunction and perform a behavioral neurological exam. The appropriate use of structural and functional brain imaging studies will be emphasized. Students will also be required to participate in the management of patients with neuropsychiatric disorders.

PSYC 4020. Consultation-Liaison. 4 Credit Hours.

The course includes participation in the evaluation and management of medical and surgical inpatients with psychiatric problems at the University Hospitals.

PSYC 4023. Child & Adolescent Psychiatry. 4 Credit Hours.

To gain clinical experience in both inpatient and outpatient child/adolescent psychiatry, the student will attend the Child Guidance Center and Christus Santa Rosa Children's Hospital outpatient psychiatry clinics. Some half-days are spent at the Southwest Mental Health Center working with children and adolescent inpatients. The student will also rotate one half-day a week at the Bexar County Juvenile Detention Center and attend seminars with the child and adolescent psychiatry residents. Experiences may be adjusted to fit students' individual interests.

PSYC 4024. Telepsychiatry. 4 Credit Hours.

The rotation introduces the medical student to some of the technical, legal, and patient care issues arising from the use of telehealth technologies. Telehealth is defined as providing services remotely through technology including phone contact and videoconferencing. This technology is being used increasingly to provide needed psychiatric services for underserved rural areas. Studies have demonstrated non-inferiority of services provided through telehealth services. Medical students will participate in a 1:1 supervised experience with a faculty member providing telepsychiatry for mental health evaluation and treatment using a Tandberg unit from the remote site in San Antonio to an originating clinical site in VA Texas Valley Coastal Bend Healthcare System (VATVCBHCS). There are no in-person patient contacts during this rotation as all services are provided through videoconferencing to the originating VA clinics. This educational experience will be provided under the supervision of the telehealth psychiatrist located on site in San Antonio with the medical student. Notes and orders will be documented through the VA's Computerized Patient Record System (CPRS). Patients will be asked to complete clinical rating scales at the time of the appointment and a satisfaction survey following each clinical encounter, which are tracked for quality improvement purposes. The rotation will include 1/2 hour weekly didactic sessions for the students. Material will include information on clinical skills such as interviewing, mental status exam, and diagnostics as they are performed using the videoconferencing equipment.

PSYC 7000. Off Campus. 4 Credit Hours.

All off campus rotations must be approved by the designated faculty member prior to the beginning of the rotation (at least one week before the course begins). Credit will not be given for any rotation that has not been approved in advance. Required paperwork includes: "Course Approval" form, a written letter or email for acceptance form the physician preceptor with the start and end dates of the course/rotation, and a course description of your learning objectives and responsibilities during the rotation. Forms must include a complete address and telephone number for the off campus location or residence address for the student while at the off campus site. Forms will not be approved after the rotation has already begun. Contact the department for assistance with enrolling in this course.

RADI Courses

RADI 4001. General Diagnostic Radiology. 4 Credit Hours.

This course is designed as an introduction to diagnostic radiology. The primary goals of the course are directed toward introducing the student to the different diagnostic imaging modalities available and teaching the student to select the appropriate radiologic examinations for different clinical problems. Students will have the opportunity to receive a working knowledge of diagnostic radiology through lectures, individual projects, reading assignments, participation in subspecialty rotations, teaching conferences, and study of the American College of Radiology teaching file.

RADI 4006. Pediatric Radiology. 4 Credit Hours.

By being with the pediatric radiologist on a one-on-one basis through most of the working day, the student will have the opportunity to gain some insight as to the radiologist's role as a clinician, consultant, and teacher; and acquire some knowledge of general pediatrics, neonatology, urology, orthopaedics, and other specialties. The student may attend Diagnostic Radiology Lectures.

RADI 4007. Review Of Radiology for the Intern. 0.5 Credit Hours.

This is a refresher course in Clinical Diagnostic Radiology. In a large group format, a Radiology faculty member will review with the participants the basics of evaluating the chest X-ray, chest CT, abdominal CT, spinal, head, and pediatric cases. In addition, time will be spent on reviewing the appropriate studies to order for the work-up of various clinical scenarios.

RADI 4020. Mammography- A Multidisciplinary Approach. 4 Credit Hours.

This elective is intended to educate students in the subject of mammography with a multidisciplinary approach. Students will be allowed to spend 2 days each week in medical oncology, surgical oncology, or radiation therapy. Students will primarily be assigned to the mammography section of radiology, learning what criteria are used to detect breast cancer and participating in the work-up of lesions and witnessing biopsies. In addition, they will attend tumor board once a week that is multidisciplinary one day per week will set aside for library student and the students will be asked to research a topic or participate in a project regarding mammography. We intend that this elective will thoroughly educate those who are interested in mammography and help them understand how our specialty is integrated with many other disciplines.

RADI 4202. General Diagnostic Radiology. 4 Credit Hours.

By being with the pediatric radiologist on a one-on-one basis through most of the working day, the student will have the opportunity to gain some insight as to the radiologist's role as a clinician, consultant, and teacher; and acquire some knowledge of general pediatrics, neonatology, urology, orthopaedics, and other specialties. The student may attend Diagnostic Radiology Lectures.

RADI 5001. Basic Radiation Safety. 1 Credit Hour.

This course provides the student with the opportunity to gain a conceptual understanding of the radiation protection principles involved in the research, diagnostic, and therapeutic uses of radiation sources. This course will cover the safe receipt, use, storage, and disposal of radiation sources in the biomedical research setting. The contents of this course fulfill HSC training requirements in order to use radioactive materials on campus. Successful participants will earn three HSC safety certificates of completion: Basic Radiation Safety Training, Basic Laser Safety Training, and Basic Laboratory Safety Training.

RADI 5005. Fundamentals Of Radiation Dosimetry. 3 Credit Hours.

The aim of this course is to introduce the students to the fundamentals of radiation dosimetry, including dosimetry quantities, interactions with matter, cavity theory and calibration protocols. More specifically, the topics that will be covered during this course are the following: 1) Introduction/Ionizing Radiation, 2) Quantities for describing interactions, 3) Exponential attenuation, 4) Charged particle and radiation equilibria, 5) Absorbed dose in radioactive media, 6) Radioactive decay, 7) X-ray interactions with matter, 8) Charged particle interactions with matter, 9) Cavity theory, 10) Dosimetry Fundamentals, and 11) Calibration protocols.

RADI 5007. Statistics in the Radiological Sciences. 2 Credit Hours.

An overview of biomedical statistics methods and basic applications to experimental design with special emphasis given to those methods used in radiation detection, image analysis, and evaluations of diagnostic efficacy. Students will learn the theory behind these methods and apply them to actual and simulated problems in the Radiological Sciences using the R statistical programming environment.

RADI 5010. Medical Biophysics. 3 Credit Hours.

This course is an introduction to the basic principles of biophysics as applied to medicine and biology. Emphasis will be placed on non-imaging topics of medical biophysics such as mechanics, thermodynamics, diffusion, electrical conduction, biomagnetism, and light spectroscopy.

RADI 5011. Radiation And Nuclear Physics. 3 Credit Hours.

This course reviews nuclear structure, interactions of radiation with matter, and the statistical nature of radiation. The course covers gas, scintillation, and solid-state detector technologies and their applications, including spectroscopy.

RADI 5015. Physics Of Diagnostic Imaging 1. 3 Credit Hours.

This course introduces the student to the basic principles and radiological practice using noninvasive imaging systems. Topics include production of x-rays, interaction of radiation with matter, and the physics of imaging using computed tomography, ultrasound, and magnetic resonance. Prerequisites: consent of instructor.

RADI 5018. Physics Measurements In Imaging Lab. 2 Credit Hours.

This is a laboratory course focusing on performance of measurements used in quality assurance (QA), system characterization, and acceptance testing of medical imagers. Corequisites: RADI 5015.

RADI 5020. Principles of Health Physics 1. 3 Credit Hours.

This course covers the basic principles of protection dealing with the major forms of ionizing radiation.

RADI 5025. Molecular Oncology & Radiobiology. 1.5-3 Credit Hours.

This course is an overview of the physics and chemistry of radiation biology; the biological effects of ionizing and non-ionizing radiations and hyperthermia at the cellular and tissue levels and whole body and late effects.

RADI 5030. Neuroscience Imaging Laboratory. 1 Credit Hour.

Students are assigned to rotate in 6 laboratories at the RIC: MRI, PET, TMS, ERP, animal imaging, and optical imaging. In each lab, students will have the opportunity for hands-on experience on subject preparation, data acquisition, and processing.

RADI 5050. Human Neuroelectrophysiology. 3 Credit Hours.

A detailed study of the electrophysiological basis of human behavior, with an emphasis on event-related brain potentials associated with cognitive function, perception, and action. See instructor for prerequisite coursework.

RADI 5090. Sem Radiological Science. 1-9 Credit Hours.

Each student is required to register a minimum of two terms if following an M.S. degree plan or four terms if following a Ph.D. plan. Seminars will review current findings in the field.

RADI 6012. Phys Nuclear Medi Imaging. 3 Credit Hours.

This course is a study of physical principles of planar, SPECT, and PET radionuclide imaging; instrument theory; dosimetry; computer uses; and safety considerations. Prerequisites: RADI 5011.

RADI 6014. Physics Of Dental Imaging. 2 Credit Hours.

This course is a survey of imaging procedures used in modern dentistry with an emphasis on the clinical objectives and physical principles underlying intraoral, panoramic, cephalometric, and digital dental radiography. Prerequisites: consent of instructor.

RADI 6015. Physics Measurements in Imaging 2. 3 Credit Hours.

Students will become study and work with advanced methods for evaluating the performance of clinical imagining systems, including x-ray imagining, fluoroscopy, mammography, ultrasound, x-ray CT and MRI. Testing will follow procedures described in publications of the AAPM and ACR and used to achieve compliance with the regulations and recommendations the DSA, MQSA, ACR, NRC, MIPPA and State of Texas' Radiation Control Program. Students will study the procedures and then use "best practices" to perform the tests in a clinical setting. Methods for evaluating nuclear medicine equipment shall also be reviewed and carried out, but in a less intensive manner. Prerequisites: RADI 5015, RADI 6049, RADI 6012, RADI 6016.

RADI 6016. Physics of Diagnostic Imaging 2. 3 Credit Hours.

This course includes theory and applications of various forms of electronic imaging systems; advanced diagnostic imaging principles involving mathematical image analysis, digital image processing, digital image display, and concepts of electronic imaging. Prerequisites: consent of instructor.

RADI 6017. Neuroimaging Methods. 3 Credit Hours.

This course will deal extensively with several noninvasive brain imaging techniques to study the functional organization of the human and animal brains. Methods covered include positron-emission tomography (PET), event-related potentials, magneto-encephalography, optical imaging, voltage and calcium imaging, autoradiography, as well as transcranial magnetic stimulation. The course will only touch upon anatomical and functional MRI as well as high field MRI, as students will receive exhaustive MRI training from other classes. Course format will include both lectures on the several methods and seminars in which recent technical advances in the field are discussed. Prerequisites: consent of instructor.

RADI 6018. Foundations Of Neuroscience Imaging. 3 Credit Hours.

This course will explore several advanced topics in cognitive neuroimaging techniques. Examples of such topics include strategies to study the functional and/or anatomical organization of the human brain and paradigms used for studying a variety of brain functions. Students interested in functional MRI as well as DTI will have an opportunity to gain extensive knowledge and experience.

RADI 6019. Pulse Sequence Programming For MRI. 3 Credit Hours.

This course is an introduction to the basic principles of image processing as applied to digital radiography, computed tomography, ultrasound imaging, and magnetic resonance images. Prerequisites: RADI 6016.

RADI 6020. Advanced Topics In Cognitive Neuroscience. 3 Credit Hours.

This course will explore several advanced topics in cognitive neuroscience. It includes exhaustive study of a brain function in normal and in disease states. Brain functions include but are not limited to sensation, perception, action, language, motion, and cognition.

RADI 6021. Prin/Health Physics 2. 3 Credit Hours.

RADI 6022. Programming Medical for Physics. 1 Credit Hour.

The purpose of the course is to demonstrate to students the usefulness of programming for medical physics. The Matlab programming language is chosen because it enables rapid coding and data visualization. Students will first be taught basic programming techniques. Then , they will be shown specific examples of these techniques being applied to medical physics. Finally, they will create a final program, which performs a task of the student's choosing and utilizes several concepts from the course. Students will be graded based on their attendance and programming projects. Must have familiarity with the field of medical physics.

RADI 6023. Introduction To Clinical Medical Physics Practice. 1-9 Credit Hours.

This course allows students to observe professional medical physicists in a clinical setting and learn the roles of various other medical professionals in the Radiology and Radiation Oncology medical clinic. Students participate in simple tasks related to medical physics data and are shown how to evaluate data to provide reports and tables. Students are also trained in basic safety and ethical issues in clinical medicine and the professional conduct of the medical physicist, following the guidelines established in AAPM Report 109. This material is intended to cover ethical issues in clinical medicine and in the professional conduct of the medical physicist .The term ethics is used here in the sense of a permissible standard of conduct for members of profession. While different people may have different opinions of what is ethical professions always have certain ethical standards or codes of conduct that are complied in written form and are generally by practitioners. In addition to becoming familiar with written codes of conduct, the student shall be introduced to commonly encountered situations in which a choice of actions is available, some of which would be considered unethical and some of which be considered ethical, according to current standards of care of practice. These would include more specific issues that arise with respect to recent patient privacy concerns and legislation specific to the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA) and compliance both in clinical practice and research. A case-based approach in a seminar setting with class participation is utilized. This allows the student to put him or herself in the place of an individual who faces an ethical dilemma and to explore variations of the case that is presented. Other faculty members are also encouraged to attend, to offer comments, and to relate situations that they encountered either first- or secondhand.

RADI 6024. Radiological Anatomy & Physiology. 3 Credit Hours.

This course will provide students with an opportunity to learn anatomy, physiology, and commonly used medical terminology as it relates to radiologic imaging. Anatomic and physiologic features will be illustrated with radiologic images in formats commonly encountered in clinical radiology. By the end of the course, students are expected to be familiar with basic medical terminology and have a good understanding of medical anatomy, physiology, and some basic pathology as related to specific organs for which radiologic images are commonly applied.

RADI 6025. Therapy Clinical Rotation 1. 12 Credit Hours.

The first clinical rotation is designed to give an introduction and an overview of all the clinical processes and the basic safety training. In detail the student will cover the following topics: employe orientation, radiation oncology orientation, HIPAA training, introduction to radiation protection, introduction to nursing and introduction to simulation, introduction to LINACs, LINAC QA and warm up, monitor unit calculations, electronic medical records orientation, regulations and professional recommendations.

RADI 6026. Clinical Therapy Rotation 2. 12 Credit Hours.

In the second semester of the clinical rotation, the students will cover the following topics: on board MV and kV imaging, ExacTrac design, function and daily, monthly QA, Linac Annual QA and the RPC process, TBI and TSE, IMRT planning, LDR planning and the COMS eye plaque process, patient safety, and learn shielding techniques for CT, kV imaging, LINAC and isotopes.

RADI 6027. Imaging Physics Clinical Rotation 1. 12 Credit Hours.

The first clinical rotation is designed to give an introduction and an overview of all the clinical processes and the basic safety training. In detail the student will cover the following topics: employee orientation, clinical radiology department orientation, HIPAA & MIPPA training, introduction to safety in the radiology clinic, introduction to general radiography, introduction to hard copy devices and image displays, electronic medical records orientation, introduction to ultrasounds imaging, introduction to mammography, regulations and professional recommendations.

RADI 6030. Physics Of Radiotherapy. 3 Credit Hours.

Theory, design, and operation of radiation-producing equipment used in radiation therapy are introduced. Exposure and absorbed dose calculations, patient dosimetry, treatment planning, and use of computers in radiation therapy are covered.

RADI 6031. Physics Measurements In Radiotherapy I. 3 Credit Hours.

Performance of measurements on radiation therapy equipment used to determine therapy treatment parameters is the opportunity for study in this course.

RADI 6032. Clinical Therapy Rotation 3. 12 Credit Hours.

In the third semester of the clinical rotation, the students will cover the following topics: treatment plan checks, weekly chart checks, brachytherapy planning and QA, LINAC design, SRS Treatment Planning (SRS) and daily, monthly and annual QA, participation in all aspects of SBRT treatment and treatment planning QA.

RADI 6033. Advanced Radiotherapy Physics. 3 Credit Hours.

This course includes the coverage of advanced radiation therapy special topics: intensity modulated radiation therapy, advanced brachytherapy, and radiation therapy shielding.

RADI 6034. Therapy Clinical Rotation 4. 12 Credit Hours.

In the fourth semester of the clinical rotation, the students will cover the following topics: medical dosimetry rotation, ultrasound, PET, MRI, SPECT imaging in radiotherapy and acceptance and commissioning of major equipment.

RADI 6035. Physics Measurements In Radiotherapy 2. 3 Credit Hours.

In this course students will have the opportunity to gain further didactic and hands-on familiarity with radiation therapy measurement equipment (ion chambers, films, TLDs, water tanks, profilers, etc.) and learn daily clinical practices. Students will have the opportunity to learn the roles of a radiation oncology team, the generation of radiation therapy treatment plans, patient quality assurance, and advanced, specialized radiation therapy techniques. Learning can be accomplished through attendance of didactic lectures, homework assignments, presentations of class projects, and a comprehensive oral exam. Prerequisites: RADI 5005, RADI 6030, and RADI 6031.

RADI 6038. Methods in Dosimetry & Shielding Design. Credit Hours.

The goal of the course is to teach students the guidelines established by the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) and the National Council of Radiation Protection (NCRP) relating to patient dosimetry and shielding design of radiological facilities. Students will be responsible to read, comprehend, and learn the selected Task Group reports. Students will be evaluated of their knowledge by weekly quizzes and a final oral evaluation held at the end of the course. Successful completion of the course will be accomplished when the student is knowledgeable and understands the recommendations for a practicing clinical physicist. Learning is accomplished through attendance of weekly lectures, assignments (presentation of assigned reports and guidelines), and class discussion.

RADI 6039. Imaging Physics Clinical Rotation 2. 12 Credit Hours.

In the second semester of the clinical rotation, topics covered include safety in the radiological clinic, nuclear medicine and MRI, introduction to fluoroscopy, computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, nuclear medicine and regulations, professionalism and ethics.

RADI 6040. Imaging Physics Clinical Rotation 3. 12 Credit Hours.

The third clinical rotation will include safety in radiology clinic, advanced general radiography, advanced breast imaging and image-guided stereotactic breast biopsy, dental radiography and cone beam CT, dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry (DEXA), advanced fluoroscopic imaging and special procedures, intermediate nuclear medicine and regulations, professionalism and ethics.

RADI 6042. Non-Ionizing Radiation Biology. 1-9 Credit Hours.

This course is an overview of the biological and known or potential health effects of non-ionizing radiation, with attention to radio frequency radiation in the microwave range, extremely low frequency (ELF) field exposures, LASER emissions, and ultraviolet (UV) light exposure.

RADI 6043. Imaging Physics Clinical Rotation 4. 12 Credit Hours.

The fourth clinical rotation will include safety in radiology clinic, imaging informatics, advanced imaging informatics, advanced magnetic resonance imaging, advanced nuclear medicine physics, regulations, professionalism and ethics.

RADI 6049. Intro To Magnetic Resonance. 2 Credit Hours.

This course presents the basics of the practice of magnetic resonance as the experimentalist or clinician first meets them. The approach begins with images, equipment, and scanning protocols. The student will have the opportunity to face issues pertinent to practice with theoretical background added as experience grows. Through this approach, key ideas are introduced in an intuitive style that is faithful to the underlying physics.

RADI 6050. Magnetic Resonance Imaging. 2 Credit Hours.

This course explores the physics of magnetic resonance image formation through discussion of imaging problems, reviews of current research topics with an emphasis on quantitative methods using MRI, and hands-on experience in MRI laboratories. Prerequisites: RADI 6049.

RADI 6051. Statistical Parametric Mapping. 3 Credit Hours.

Course content includes principles of NMR Spectroscopy as applied to the resolution of molecular structural problems in chemistry, biology, and medicine; and principles and methods for designing BOLD contrast MRI experiments and evaluating fMRI data.

RADI 6060. Biophotonics and Optical Imaging. 3 Credit Hours.

Optical methodologies for imaging, diagnosis, and therapy are rapidly advancing in biology and medicine. This course will review basic elements of optics and optical sources, especially lasers and light-emitting solid state devices, in the context of biomedical applications. Dosimetry, tissue optics, and the principles of laser-tissue interaction will be considered in depth. Current medical uses of lasers will be surveyed, along with their scientific and technical foundations. The course will conclude with several case studies of research areas that are currently hot topics in biomedical optics.

RADI 6062. Cognitive Neuroscience. 3 Credit Hours.

Cognitive Neuroscience deals with the neural basis of cognition and behavior, including considerations of perception, attention, motor control, language, learning, memory, executive function, spatial cognition, emotion, and social cognition. It also presents discussions on neurocognitive development and the evolution of the human brain. Unlike courses in basic neuroscience, this course has a more human focus, presenting in-depth discussions of neuroimaging techniques and literature. In addition, it focuses on psychological models of cognitive function derived from psychological experimentation, human lesion studies, and computational modeling. Cognitive Neuroscience presents an integrated view of the psychology and neurobiology of human cognition and behavior. By the end of the semester, students will have had the opportunity to: (1) become highly familiar with the structure of the human nervous system; (2) become conversant about the physical basis and limitations of neuroimaging techniques; (3) become familiar with the principal brain areas thought to be involved in a host of human cognitive competencies and behaviors, including perception, action, emotion, and language; and (4) understand how psychological theory and neural theory come together to form the foundation of cognitive neuroscience.

RADI 6071. Supervised Teaching. 1-12 Credit Hours.

This course is a presentation of lectures and supervised teaching under the direction of faculty.

RADI 6091. Special Topics. 1-12 Credit Hours.

This course covers topics of special interest which may include emerging and new modalities in radiological sciences relating to x-ray, nuclear, or magnetic imaging.

RADI 6097. Research. 1-12 Credit Hours.

This course is supervised research under the guidance of a faculty member.

RADI 6098. Thesis. 1-12 Credit Hours.

Registration for at least two terms is required for M.S. candidates. Prerequisites: admission to candidacy for the Master of Science degree.

RADI 7000. Off Campus. 4 Credit Hours.

All off campus rotations must be approved by the designated faculty member prior to the beginning of the rotation (at least one week before the course begins). Credit will not be given for any rotation that has not been approved in advance. Required paperwork includes: "Course Approval" form, a written letter or email for acceptance form the physician preceptor with the start and end dates of the course/rotation, and a course description of your learning objectives and responsibilities during the rotation. Forms must include a complete address and telephone number for the off campus location or residence address for the student while at the off campus site. Forms will not be approved after the rotation has already begun. Contact the department for assistance with enrolling in this course.

RADI 7005. Treatment Planning Techniques In Radiation Therapy. 3 Credit Hours.

The goal of the course is to provide an overview of the physics and clinical elements that contribute to the development of computerized treatment plans in radiation therapy. The commissioning and acceptance testing of a planning system will be discussed and demonstrated in several planning platforms. Anatomy specific treatment planning will be described, including imaging of the specific disease, as well as contouring and plan development. Multiple plans will be generated for each site using different planning modalities, such as 2D, 3D, and IMRT.

RADI 7006. Treatment Planning Techniques in Radiotherapy 2. 3 Credit Hours.

This course is a continuation of RADI 7005. It presents an in-depth study of multidisciplinary treatment of the cancer patient from the clinician's viewpoint. Students are required to master concepts specific to site-specific disease including: histopathology, etiologic and epidemiology factors, detection and diagnosis, tumor stage and grade, routes of metastases, dose fractionation and prognostic factors. This course is designed to approach each cancer type by anatomic system, addressing treatment factors with increasing degrees of complexity. Assigned exercises organized by treatment site and procedure type will be carried out under the direct supervision of an assigned advisor. These will be both simulated and real case assignments. The course is taught as a didactic course with applied planning. Didactic instruction will be provided by medical residents while practical planning instruction will be applied by a medical dosimetrist.

RADI 7010. Motor Learning And Brain Imaging. 3 Credit Hours.

This course is designed for the advanced student (doctoral or postdoctoral) to obtain a comprehensive overview of the field of motor learning from behavioral and brain imaging perspectives. Topic coverage will include general motor learning and speech motor learning (with reference to treatment of motor speech disorders). The course will be structured in a seminar format. The course will explore measurement methods and issues in motor learning and the neural substrates of learning in intact and disordered subject groups.

RADI 7099. Dissertation. 1-12 Credit Hours.

Registration for at least one term is required for Ph.D. candidates. Prerequisites: admission to candidacy for Doctor of Philosophy degree.

RADO Courses

RADO 4000. Special Topic. 4 Credit Hours.

This is a self-designed course created by both the student and the department to cover a specific topic. A Course Approval Form must be completed along with documentation of the designed course description.

RADO 4003. Clinical Radiation Medicine. 4 Credit Hours.

Participation in daily operations at the Cancer Therapy and Research Center includes treatment planning conferences, simulation, computer planning, applied physics, treatment setups, etc. Assistance is provided in consultations, follow-up clinics, and inter-departmental activities and ongoing projects. Emphasis is on radiation oncology. Responsibility is given according to capability and interest.

RADO 7000. Radiation Oncology Off-Campus. 4 Credit Hours.

All off campus rotations must be approved by the designated faculty member prior to the beginning of the rotation (at least one week before the course begins). Credit will not be given for any rotation that has not been approved in advance. Required paperwork includes: "Course Approval" form, a written letter or email for acceptance form the physician preceptor with the start and end dates of the course/rotation, and a course description of your learning objectives and responsibilities during the rotation. Forms must include a complete address and telephone number for the off campus location or residence address for the student while at the off campus site. Forms will not be approved after the rotation has already begun. Contact the department for assistance with enrolling in this course.

REHB Courses

REHB 4000. Special Topic. 4 Credit Hours.

Brain Injury Rehabilitation rotation will enable students to obtain experiences in the neurologic rehabilitation of persons with brain injury. Brain injury etiologies treated include traumatic brain injury, encephalopathy secondary to metabolic, toxic, and anoxic insults, aneurismal and AVM bleeds and occasional strokes. The rotation will involve significant neuromedical and rehabilitative involvement with inpatient care, brain injury consult service, outpatient care, and, as appropriate with care of low level brain injury patients.

REHB 4001. Clinical Rehabilitation Medicine. 4 Credit Hours.

This course is especially recommended for students planning to specialize in Family Practice, Neurology, Neurosurgery, Orthopaedics, Internal Medicine, or Rheumatology. The student will have the opportunity to participate in patient-care activities and limited exposure to electrodiagnostic procedures under the direct supervision of faculty and residents. The student will have exposure to Rehabilitation Medicine from an outpatient and consultative perspective and is required to attend teaching conferences, lectures, rounds, etc. (University Hospital and/or VA Hospital). No late drops will be accepted.

REHB 4002. Introductory Inpatient Rehabilitation. 4 Credit Hours.

This course is especially recommended for students planning to specialize in Family Practice, Neurology, Neurosurgery, Orthopaedics, Plastic Surgery, ENT, Internal Medicine or Rheumatology. The course will provide in-depth exposure to inpatient rehabilitation and the major rehabilitation areas. The course will include experience in diagnosis and comprehensive rehabilitation management of inpatients with strokes, spinal cord injuries, neurologic disorders, rheumatoid arthritis, amputations, chronic pain, and other major disabling conditions. The student must attend teaching conferences, lectures, and rounds. This selective will be tailored to specific student interest. Comprehensive work-ups and close follow-up of patients will be required (University Hospital). No late drops will be accepted.

REHB 4003. Intro Pediatric Rehabilitation. 4 Credit Hours.

This course is especially recommended for students planning to specialize in Pediatrics or Family Medicine. The course includes inpatient and outpatient experience emphasizing comprehensive team rehabilitation of children with spina bifida, childhood spinal cord injury, cerebral palsy, brain damage in childhood, juvenile rheumatoid arthritis, and other chronic disabling diseases of childhood and adolescence. The student must participate in patient care under supervision of faculty and residents and attend teaching conferences. This course includes exposure to adults with congenital conditions and mental retardation (Christus Santa Rosa Children's Hospital and University Hospital). No late drops will be accepted.

REHB 4005. Combined Rehabilitation. 4 Credit Hours.

The course is required for students planning to specialize in Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation and recommended for those desiring a broad Rehabilitation Medicine exposure. The course will provide an overview of the specialty of PM&R allowing faculty/resident-supervised participation in patient care activities related to Rehabilitation Medicine consultations, electrodiagnostic procedures, Inpatient Rehabilitation, and Pediatric Rehabilitation. Students must also attend teaching conferences, clinics, lectures, rounds, etc. (University Hospital, VA Hospital, Christus Santa Rosa Children's Hospital). No late drops will be accepted.

REHB 4006. Intro Spinal Cord Injury. 4 Credit Hours.

This course is especially recommended for students planning to specialize in Family Practice, Neurosurgery, Neurology, Orthopaedics, Internal Medicine, and Plastic Surgery. This rotation will provide the student with the opportunity to actively participate in the management of patients who have sustained a spinal cord injury. Working in a state-of-the-art spinal cord injury facility, students are required to participate in treating patients in virtually all aspects of their injury, from acute care, to rehabilitation evaluation and treatment, to eventual discharge and outpatient follow-up. Students must become an integral part of an interdisciplinary team under the supervision of faculty and residents (VA Hospital and/or University Hospital). No late drops will be accepted.

REHB 4007. Hyperbaric Medicine & Wound Care. 4 Credit Hours.

This course is designed to introduce the student to the principles of wound care, advanced wound therapies, and hyperbaric medicine. The student will have the opportunity to observe monoplace and multiple hyperbaric medicine treatments; will review theory of the use of hyperbaric in the 14 UHMS approved therapies. Complication and controversies of HBO use will be discussed in lecture format. The student is required to review common wound problems, diabetes infection, nutrition, venous stasis, and arterial insufficiency. Advanced treatment modalities will be observed and reviewed - wound vac, collagen, apligraf, OASIS, debriding agents. (University Center for Community Health {Texas Diabetes Institute}). No late drops will be accepted.

REHB 4008. Rehabilitation Engineering. 4 Credit Hours.

This course is especially recommended for students planning to specialize in Family Practice, Neurology, Neurosurgery, Orthopaedics, Internal Medicine, or Rheumatology. The student will have the opportunity to participate in patient-care activities and have limited exposure to orthotics, prosthetics, and pedorthotics procedures under the direct supervision of faculty and residents. The student will have exposure to Rehabilitation Medicine from an outpatient/inpatient perspective and is required to attend clinics to experience comprehensive rehabilitation management of inpatients with strokes, spinal cord injuries, neurologic disorders, rheumatoid arthritis, amputations, and other major disabling conditions requiring orthothoses, prosthetics, and pedorthotics. The student will have exposure to the gait lab to experience research and an understanding of gait. {University Hospital and University Center for Community Health (Texas Diabetes Institute)}. No late drops will be accepted.

REHB 4009. Polytrauma. 4 Credit Hours.

This course is recommended for students planning to specialize in PM&R, Neurosurgery, Neurology, Emergency Medicine, Orthopedics, Family Medicine or Internal Medicine. This course will enable students to obtain experiences in the neurologic rehabilitation of persons with brain injury, which includes traumatic brain injury and encephalopathy secondary to metabolic, toxic and anoxic etiologies.

REHB 7000. Off Campus. 4 Credit Hours.

All off campus rotations must be approved by the designated faculty member prior to the beginning of the rotation (at least one week before the course begins). Credit will not be given for any rotation that has not been approved in advance. Required paperwork includes: "Course Approval" form, a written letter or email for acceptance form the physician preceptor with the start and end dates of the course/rotation, and a course description of your learning objectives and responsibilities during the rotation. Forms must include a complete address and telephone number for the off campus location or residence address for the student while at the off campus site. Forms will not be approved after the rotation has already begun. Contact the department for assistance with enrolling in this course.

SURG Courses

SURG 3005. Surgery Clerkship. 8 Credit Hours.

The 12-week clerkship is divided into two 6-week rotations, one on general surgery and one on surgical specialties. Each of these rotations is then subdivided into two 3-week sessions with the general surgery rotation consisting of sessions on each of two different surgical services and the surgical specialties rotation including sessions on two different specialty services chosen electively from among seven surgical specialties. During this surgical clerkship, the student is afforded the opportunity to participate actively in the diagnosis and therapy of patients suffering from both acute and chronic surgical illness including both ambulatory and bedridden patients. The clerkship is interwoven with teaching ward rounds, clinical conferences, symposia, and a reading program with weekly examination and reviews on all aspects of surgery and the surgical specialties. The goals of the surgical clerkship are to provide students the opportunity to develop adequate knowledge, basic manual skills, and attitudes about surgical disease that should be encompassed by every practicing physician.

SURG 4000. Special Topic. 4 Credit Hours.

This is a self-designed course created by both the student and the department to cover a specific topic. A Course Approval Form must be completed along with documentation of the designed course description.

SURG 4002. Surgical Oncology. 4 Credit Hours.

Senior students must function as "interns" on the surgical oncology service. They admit and discharge surgical oncology patients. They perform history and physical examinations, and keep daily records on surgical oncology patients. They follow patients in the outpatient clinics, in the emergency department, in the intensive care units and on general wards. They participate in operations for their patients. They participate in pre-and post-operative care of surgical oncology patients. They present cases, attend all conferences, and take call as designated by the surgical oncology service. They mentor third-year medical students on the surgical oncology service. They may participate in basic science research projects in the surgical oncology laboratory and in ongoing clinical trials of cancer diagnosis and management.

SURG 4004. Supervised Basic Science Research. 4 Credit Hours.

Senior students are required to participate in a basic science project in a research laboratory. Before students enroll in the course, they must contact a surgery faculty member with whom they want to conduct a basic science research project. In order to receive credit for this elective, a student must write a brief synopsis of the basic science research project including: research purpose, methodology, and project (report, abstract, presentation, experiments). The students must submit the synopsis with paperwork for approval of the elective. Midway during the elective {2 (or 4) weeks}, a student must submit a progress report to the Director of Surgical Education and the supervising surgery faculty member. At the end of the elective, a student will submit a final report to the Director of Surgical Education and to the supervising faculty member, Texas Diabetes Institute.

SURG 4006. Supervised Clinical Science Research. 4 Credit Hours.

Senior students are required to participate in a clinical science project. Before students enroll in the course, they need to contact a surgery faculty member with whom they want to conduct a clinical science research project. In order to receive credit for this elective, a student must write a brief synopsis of the clinical science research project including: research purpose, methodology, and project (report, abstract, presentation, clinical protocol). A student must submit the synopsis with paperwork for approval of the elective. Midway during the elective {2 (or 4) weeks}, a student must submit a progress report to the Director of Surgical Education and the supervising surgery faculty member. At the end of the elective, the student must submit a final report to the Director of Surgical Education and to the supervising faculty member.

SURG 4007. General Surgery Selective-BAMC/Burn Unit. 4 Credit Hours.

Senior students may take a general surgery clerkship at BAMC. They may also take a clerkship at the Burn Unit at the U. S. Army Institute of Surgical Research at Fort Sam Houston. Senior students function as "interns" on each service. They admit and discharge surgical patients. They perform history and physical examinations, and keep daily records on surgical patients. They follow patients in the outpatient clinics, in the emergency department, in the intensive care units, and on general wards. They participate in operations for their patients. They participate in pre- and post-operative care of surgical patients. They present cases, attend all conferences, and take call as designated by the service. Students who participate on the Burn Unit have good exposure to the diagnosis, resuscitation, and treatment of critically ill patients.

SURG 4012. Oral Maxillofacial Surgery. 4 Credit Hours.

Senior students function as "interns" on the oral maxillofacial surgery service. They admit and discharge oral maxillofacial patients. They perform history and physical examinations, and keep daily records on oral maxillofacial patients. They follow patients in the outpatient clinics, in the emergency department, in the intensive care units, and on general wards. They participate in operations for their patients. They participate in pre- and post-operative care of oral maxillofacial issues including outpatient sedation and anesthesia, dentoalveolar surgery, facial fractures, facial aesthetic and reconstructive surgery, management of facial and dental pain, and management of facial infections.

SURG 4026. Plastic Surgery Selective. 4 Credit Hours.

Senior students function as "interns" on the plastic surgery service. They admit and discharge plastic surgery patients. They perform history and physical examinations, and keep daily records on plastic surgery patients. They follow patients in the outpatient clinics, in the emergency department, in the intensive care units, and on general wards. They participate in operations for their patients. They participate in pre- and post-operative care of plastic surgery patients. They present cases, attend all conferences, and take call as designated by the plastic surgery service. They mentor third-year medical students on the plastic surgery service. They have exposure to a wide range of plastic surgery issues including complex wound management, aesthetic plastic surgery, facial fractures, reconstructive surgery of the head and neck, and breast, hand, and extremity.

SURG 4031. Transplant Surgery Selective. 4 Credit Hours.

Senior students function as "interns" on the transplant surgery service. They admit and discharge transplant patients. They perform history and physical examinations, and keep daily records on transplant patients. They follow patients in the outpatient clinics, in the emergency department, in the intensive care units, and on general wards. They participate actively in live renal and liver donor evaluation. They participate in operations for their patients, including liver resection and renal, pancreas, and liver transplants. They participate in the evaluation and procurement of the multiorgan cadaveric donor. They participate in pre- and post-operative care of transplant patients. They present cases, attend all conferences, and take call as designated by the transplant service. They present patients at formal multidisciplinary transplant rounds daily. They mentor third-year medical students on the transplant service. They have much contact with gastroenterologists and nephrologists who care for patients on the transplant service. The students rotate at University Hospital and Santa Rosa Northwest Medical Center.

SURG 4037. Pediatric Surgery Selective. 4 Credit Hours.

Senior students function as "interns" under private practice pediatric surgeons who are clinical faculty at the Health Science Center. They admit and discharge pediatric surgery patients. They perform history and physical examinations, and keep daily records on pediatric surgery patients. They follow patients in the outpatient clinics, in the emergency department, in the intensive care units, and on general wards. They participate in operations for their patients. They participate in pre- and post-operative care of pediatric surgery patients. They present cases, attend all conferences, and take call as designated by the pediatric surgery service. They mentor third-year medical students on the pediatric surgery service. This rotation is intended for students who seek a career in pediatric surgery or primary care pediatrics. Opportunities for clinical research projects are available. The students rotate at Santa Rosa Children's Hospital.

SURG 4038. Rural Surgery Elective. 4 Credit Hours.

In this rotation, senior students work with a private practice general surgeon in a rural setting. Senior students function as a "junior partners" on this general surgery service. They admit and discharge general surgery patients. They perform history and physical examinations, and keep daily records on general surgery patients. They follow patients in the outpatient clinics, in the emergency department, in the intensive care units, and on general wards. They participate in operations for their patients. They participate in pre- and post-operative care of general surgery patients. They take call as designated by the surgeon. The objectives of this rotation are: to introduce students to the socioeconomic problems that rural patients face with access to care, to discover how the internet and distance learning decrease isolation in rural communities, to encourage students to consider surgical practice in underserved rural communities. Housing for the student will be provided during the rotation.

SURG 4040. Surgical Critical Care Selective. 4 Credit Hours.

This course provides senior students with a broad exposure to surgical critical care. Students rotate through the surgical trauma ICU and have the opportunity to gain a great understanding of the principles and practice of surgical critical care. The student will have good exposure to cardiovascular and pulmonary physiology. They will have the opportunity to learn about modern concepts of resuscitation, ventilator management, vasopressor support, nutritional support, and infection control. They will have opportunity to place central lines, PA catheters, arterial lines, and perform intubation and bronchoscopy. They will have opportunity to examine and manage critically ill and injured patients in the ICU and keep medical records daily. They will have opportunity to present patients on formal rounds daily and participate in didactic critical care conference and trauma morbidity and mortality conference. They will have opportunity to take call as designated by the service.

SURG 4042. General Surgery (UH). 4 Credit Hours.

Students function as "interns" on this broad-based general and laparoscopic surgery service. They admit and discharge general surgical patients. They perform history and physical examinations, and keep daily records on general surgical patients. They follow general surgical patients in the outpatient clinics, in the emergency department, in the intensive care units, and on general wards. They participate in operations for their patients. They participate in pre- and post-operative care of general surgical patients. They present cases, attend all conferences, and take call as designated by the general surgical service.

SURG 4043. General Surgery (Minimally Invasive Surgery- MIS). 4 Credit Hours.

Students function as "interns" on this broad-based general and laparoscopic surgery service. They admit and discharge general surgical patients. They perform history and physical examinations, and keep daily records on general surgical patients. They follow general surgical patients in the outpatient clinics, in the emergency department, in the intensive care units, and on general wards. They participate in operations for their patients. They participate in pre- and post-operative care of general surgical patients. They present cases, attend all conferences, and take call as designated by the general surgical service.

SURG 4044. General Surgery VA. 4 Credit Hours.

Senior students function as "interns" on this broad-based general surgery VA service. They admit and discharge general surgical VA patients. They perform history and physical examinations, and keep daily records on general surgical VA patients. They follow general surgical VA patients in the outpatient clinics, in the emergency department, in the intensive care units, and on general wards. They participate in operations for their patients. They participate in pre- and post-operative care of general surgical VA patients. They present cases, attend all conferences, and take call as designated by the service. They mentor third-year medical students on the general surgical VA service.

SURG 4047. Emergency Surgery. 4 Credit Hours.

Senior students function as "interns" on this emergency and trauma surgery service. They admit and discharge surgical patients. They perform history and physical examinations, and keep daily records on surgical patients. Although students will examine most patients in the emergency department, students will also examine patients in outpatient clinics, in intensive care units, and on general wards. They participate in operations for their patients. They participate in pre- and post-operative care of emergency and trauma surgical patients. They present cases, attend all conferences, and take call as designated by the service. They mentor third-year medical students on the emergency and trauma surgery service.

SURG 4048. Vascular Surgery University Hospital/VA Hospital. 4 Credit Hours.

Senior students function as "interns" on each vascular surgery UH/VA service. They admit and discharge vascular surgery UH/VA patients. They perform history and physical examinations, and keep daily records on vascular surgery UH/VA patients. They follow vascular surgery UH/VA patients in the outpatient clinics, in the emergency department, in the intensive care units, and on general wards. They participate in operations for their patients. They participate in pre- and post-operative care of vascular surgery UH/VA patients. They present cases, attend all conferences, and take call as designated by the service. They mentor third-year medical students on the vascular surgery UH/VA service. Students have the opportunity to learn to perform a complete vascular physical examination and learn to interpret vascular diagnostic studies. They will have the opportunity to learn the finer details of endovascular treatment of vascular diseases.

SURG 4049. Surgical Internship Readiness. 4 Credit Hours.

The purpose of this elective is to prepare senior medical students who are interested in a surgical career for their surgery internship. This elective is a surgical "boot camp" to provide practical "hands on" experience for students. Prerequisites: general surgery subinternship; critical-care rotation. Students can do a critical care rotation in the SICU, MICU, PICU, or CCU. These mandatory prerequisites can occur at the Health Science Center or at a remote site.

SURG 4052. Bariatric Surgery (DHR). 4 Credit Hours.

Senior students function as "interns" under Bariatric surgeons at the Doctor's Renaissance Hospital (DHR). They admit and discharge surgical patients. They perform history and physical examinations, and keep daily records on surgical patients. They follow patients in the outpatient clinics, in the emergency department, in the intensive care units and on general wards. They participate in operations for their patients. They participate in pre- and post-operative care of surgical patients. They present cases, attend all conferences, and take call as designated by the surgical service. They may mentor third year medical students on the surgical service.

SURG 4053. Colorectal Surgery (DHR). 4 Credit Hours.

Senior students function as "interns" on this broad-based general and laparoscopic surgery service at the Doctor's Renaissance Hospital (DHR). They admit and discharge general surgical patients. They perform history and physical examinations, and keep daily records on general surgical patients. They follow general surgical patients in the outpatient clinics, in the emergency department, in the intensive care units and on general wards. They participate in operations for their patients. They participate in pre- and post-operative care of general surgical patients. They present cases, attend all conferences, and take call as designated by the general surgical service. They may mentor third year medical students on the service.

SURG 4054. General Surgery (DHR). 4 Credit Hours.

Senior students function as "interns" under private practice general surgeons who are clinical faculty at the Doctor's Renaissance Hospital (DHR). They admit and discharge surgical patients. They perform history and physical examinations, and keep daily records on surgical patients. They follow patients in the outpatient clinics, in the emergency department, in the intensive care units and on general wards. They participate in operations for their patients. They participate in pre- and post-operative care of surgical patients. They present cases, attend all conferences, and take call as designated by the surgical service. They may mentor third year medical students on the surgical service.

SURG 4055. Surgical Critical Care (DHR). 4 Credit Hours.

This course provides senior students with a broad exposure to surgical critical care at the Doctor's Renaissance Hospital (DHR). Students will rotate through the surgical trauma ICU and gain a great understanding of the principles and practice of surgical critical care. The student will have good exposure to cardiovascular and pulmonary physiology. They will learn about modern concepts of resuscitation, ventilator management, vasopressor support, nutritional support, and infection control. They will have opportunity to place central lines, PA catheters, arterial lines and perform intubation and bronchoscopy. They will examine and manage critically ill and injured patients in the ICU and keep medical records daily. They will present patients on formal rounds daily and participate in didactic critical care conference and trauma morbidity and mortality conference. They will take call as designated by the service.

SURG 4056. Surgical Oncology (DHR). 4 Credit Hours.

Senior students function as "interns" on the surgical oncology service at the Doctor's Renaissance Hospital (DHR). They admit and discharge surgical oncology patients. They perform history and physical examinations, and keep daily records on surgical oncology patients. They follow patients in the outpatient clinics, in the emergency department, in the intensive care units and on general wards. They participate in operations for their patients. They participate in pre-and post-operative care of surgical oncology patients. They present cases, attend all conferences, and take call as designated by the surgical oncology service. They mentor third year medical students on the surgical oncology service. They may participate in basic science research projects in the surgical oncology laboratory and in ongoing clinical trials of cancer diagnosis and management.

SURG 4057. Vascular Surgery (DHR). 4 Credit Hours.

Senior students function as "interns" on the vascular surgery service at the Doctor's Renaissance Hospital (DHR). They admit and discharge vascular surgery patients. They perform history and physical examinations, and keep daily records on vascular surgery patients. They follow vascular surgery patients in the outpatient clinics, in the emergency department, in the intensive care units and on general wards. They participate in operations for their patients. They participate in pre- and post-operative care of vascular surgery patients. They present cases, attend all conferences, and take call as designated by the service. They mentor third year medical students on the vascular surgery service. Students learn to perform a complete vascular physical examination and learn to interpret vascular diagnostic studies. They will learn the finer details of endovascular treatment of vascular diseases.

SURG 4201. General Surgery-Harlingen. 4 Credit Hours.

Senior students function as "interns" under private practice general surgeons who are clinical faculty at the Regional Academic Health Center. They admit and discharge surgical patients. They perform history and physical examinations, and keep daily records on surgical patients. They follow patients in the outpatient clinics, in the emergency department, in the intensive care units, and on general wards. They participate in operations for their patients. They participate in pre- and post-operative care of surgical patients. They present cases, attend all conferences, and take call as designated by the surgical service. They mentor third-year medical students on the surgical service.

SURG 5001. Oral Maxillofacial Surgery Clinical Skills Course. 8 Credit Hours.

The goal of Clinical Skills module is to develop the student's bedside diagnostic skills. As a result of course lectures, readings, labs, longitudinal preceptor experience, and other Clinical Skills (CS) activities, you will be able to:(1) Perform a full history and physical and recognize specific abnormalities; (2) Record the history and physical examination in a coherent, standardized manner; (3) Construct a problem list and differential diagnosis based on the history and physical exam findings; (4) Deliver a concise organized oral presentation of the history and physical and interpretation of the findings in a standardized format.

SURG 7000. Off Campus. 4 Credit Hours.

All off campus rotations must be approved by the designated faculty member prior to the beginning of the rotation (at least one week before the course begins). Credit will not be given for any rotation that has not been approved in advance. Required paperwork includes: "Course Approval" form, a written letter or email for acceptance form the physician preceptor with the start and end dates of the course/rotation, and a course description of your learning objectives and responsibilities during the rotation. Forms must include a complete address and telephone number for the off campus location or residence address for the student while at the off campus site. Forms will not be approved after the rotation has already begun. Contact the department for assistance with enrolling in this course.

UROL Courses

UROL 4000. Special Topic. 4 Credit Hours.

Students will work with faculty in the design, preparation for and execution of basic science or clinical research projects. Translational research studies may be available and are encouraged. Some projects will require that funding or IRB approval be obtained prior to initiation so students are encouraged to discuss their proposed projects well in advance with the appropriate faculty. Participation in some existing projects with faculty that are already in progress may be possible as well.

UROL 4027. Urology Selective. 4 Credit Hours.

Senior students are required to function as "interns" on the Urology service; perform history and physical examinations; keep daily records on urology patients; follow patients in the outpatient clinics, in the emergency department, in the intensive care units, and on general wards; participate in operations for their patients and in pre- and post-operative care of urology patients; present cases, attend all conferences, and take call as designated by the urology service; mentor third-year medical students on the urology service; and present one 10- to 15-minute lecture on a urologic topic of their choice. They are encouraged to participate in basic and clinical science research projects with urology faculty.

UROL 7000. Off Campus. 4 Credit Hours.

Senior students are required to function as "interns" on the Urology service; perform history and physical examinations; keep daily records on urology patients; follow patients in the outpatient clinics, in the emergency department, in the intensive care units, and on general wards; participate in operations for their patients and in pre- and post-operative care of urology patients; present cases, attend all conferences, and take call as designated by the urology service; mentor third-year medical students on the urology service; and present one 10- to 15-minute lecture on a urologic topic of their choice. They are encouraged to participate in basic and clinical science research projects with urology faculty.