Biology of Aging

 Sample Plan of Study

First Year
FallCredit Hours
IBMS 5000Fundamentals Of Biomedical Sciences 8.0
IBMS 5008Lab Rotations 3.0
TSCI 5070Responsible Conduct Of Patient-Oriented Clinical Research 2.0
 Total Credit Hours: 13.0
First Year
SpringCredit Hours
CSBL 5095Experimental Design And Data Analysis 3.0
CSBL 6048Biology of Aging 4.0
IBMS 6090Seminar (Class Section 2BA) 1.5
IBMS 6097Research (Class Section 2BA) 3.5
 Total Credit Hours: 12.0
Second Year
FallCredit Hours
CSBL 5077Scientific Writing 2.0
IBMS 6090Seminar (Class Section 2BA) 1.5
IBMS 6097Research (Class Section 2BA) 7.5
IBMS 7010Student Journal Club & Research Presentation (Class Section 2BA) 1.0
Advanced Elective Coursework * variable
 Total Credit Hours: 12.0
Second Year
SpringCredit Hours
IBMS 6090Seminar (Class Section 2BA) 1.5
IBMS 6097Research (Class Section 2BA) 8.5
IBMS 7001Qualifying Exam (Class Section 2BA) 1.0
IBMS 7010Student Journal Club & Research Presentation (Class Section 2BA) 1.0
Advanced Elective Coursework * variable
 Total Credit Hours: 12.0
Third Year
FallCredit Hours
IBMS 6090Seminar (Class Section 2BA) 1.5
IBMS 6097Research (Class Section 2BA) 9.5
IBMS 7010Student Journal Club & Research Presentation (Class Section 2BA) 1.0
Advanced Elective Coursework * variable
 Total Credit Hours: 12.0
Third Year
SpringCredit Hours
IBMS 6090Seminar (Class Section 2BA) 1.5
IBMS 6097Research (Class Section 2BA) 9.5
IBMS 7010Student Journal Club & Research Presentation (Class Section 2BA) 1.0
Advanced Elective Coursework * variable
 Total Credit Hours: 12.0
Fourth Year
FallCredit Hours
IBMS 6090Seminar (Class Section 2BA) 1.5
IBMS 6097Research (Class Section 2BA) 6.5
IBMS 7010Student Journal Club & Research Presentation (Class Section 2BA) 1.0
IBMS 7099Dissertation (Class Section 2BA) ** 3.0
Advanced Elective Coursework * variable
 Total Credit Hours: 12.0
Fourth Year
SpringCredit Hours
IBMS 6090Seminar (Class Section 2BA) 1.5
IBMS 6097Research (Class Section 2BA) 6.5
IBMS 7010Student Journal Club & Research Presentation (Class Section 2BA) 1.0
IBMS 7099Dissertation (Class Section 2BA) ** 3.0
Advanced Elective Coursework * variable
 Total Credit Hours: 12.0
Fifth Year
FallCredit Hours
IBMS 6090Seminar (Class Section 2BA) 1.5
IBMS 6097Research (Class Section 2BA) 6.5
IBMS 7010Student Journal Club & Research Presentation (Class Section 2BA) 1
IBMS 7099Dissertation (Class Section 2BA) ** 3.0
Advanced Elective Coursework * variable
 Total Credit Hours: 12.0
Fifth Year
SpringCredit Hours
IBMS 6090Seminar (Class Section 2BA) 1.5
IBMS 6097Research (Class Section 2BA) 6.5
IBMS 7010Student Journal Club & Research Presentation (Class Section 2BA) 1
IBMS 7099Dissertation (Class Section 2BA) ** 3.0
Advanced Elective Coursework * variable
 Total Credit Hours: 12.0
*

Six (6) credit hours of electives must be taken prior to graduation. Since different elective courses vary in credit hours, Research (IBMS 6097-2BA) credit hours for a given semester should be adjusted in order to maintain a total of 12 credit hours for the semester. The menu of electives from which courses are typically selected are shown below. However, students may select, following approval of the student's supervising professor and discipline executive committee, any accredited course offered by any program in the Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences.

Suggested Electives

CSBL 6059 Stem Cells and Regenerative Medicine (1 SCH) (Spring semester only)

CSBL 5007 Methods in Cell Biology, (1 SCH)

CSBL 5083 Practical Optical Microscopy (1 SCH)

CSBL 6021 Animal Models (3 SCH)

INTD 5040 Molecular, Cellular & Developmental Neuroscience 3.0 hrs

INTD 5043 Systems Neuroscience 3.0 hrs

INTD 5040 Fundamentals of Neuroscience I: Molecular, Cellular, Developmental

INTD 5043 Fundamentals of Neuroscience II: Systems

INTD 6043 Membrane Proteins 2.0 hrs

INTD 7074 Topics in Translational Medical Product Development 1.0 hrs

PATH 5021 Biostatistics 3.0 hrs

PHAR 5091-1 Monoaminergic Neurotransmission and Transporters

PHAR 5091-2 Ion Channelopathies in Neurological Diseases

PHAR 5091-5 Neuropeptide Metabolism

PHAR 5091-6 Serotonin Soup to Nuts

PHAR 5091-8 Neural Substrates of Regulated Behaviors

PHAR 5091-9 Current Issues in Research on Mechanisms of Epilepsy

PHAR 5091-10 Appetite Control: Adiposity Hormones & Neuropeptides

PHAR 5091-18 G protein coupled receptor heteromers: pharmacological and physiological relevance

PHAR 5018 Cardiovascular, Renal and Respiratory Physiology and Therapeutics (2.0 SCH)

PHAR 5019 Metabolism, Hormones, GI Physiology and Therapeutics (2.0 SCH)

**

A minimum of 2 semesters of IBMS 7099-2BA (Dissertation) is required for graduation. A student may begin enrolling in IBMS 7099-2BA once the Dissertation Research Proposal and the Dissertation Supervising Committee membership are approved by the GSBS Dean. Final hours (3.0 SCH) may be applicable for the final semester.

Courses

CSBL 5007. Methods In Cell Biology. 1 Credit Hour.

Through a combination of lectures and demonstrations, the instructors will introduce students to techniques which are currently being used in cellular biology laboratories. The emphasis will be on the applications themselves, their uses, limitations, and the necessary controls. The following topic areas will be covered: imaging and microscopy, immunological techniques, bioinformatics (DNA and protein), rodent anatomy and histology, cytogenetics, and in vitro cell growth and transfection.

CSBL 5077. Scientific Writing. 2 Credit Hours.

This course will provide students with the opportunity to develop skills in scientific writing and the presentation of research results. It will emphasize learning-by-doing-and-re-doing. Students will be required to write something every week. The capstone project for students will be to write a grant proposal and defend it in front of the class. One hour per week will be devoted to lecture and critique of published work; the other hour will consist of critique and revision of student writing by other students, as well as by the course director. Topics to be covered include: (1) fundamentals of writing clearly, (2) principles of revision, (3) effective presentation of data, (4) fundamentals of oral presentation, (5) writing/presenting to the appropriate audience, (6) how to write background/introductory sections, (7) how to write materials and methods, (8) how to write the discussion section, and (9) how to constructively critique one's own and others writing.

CSBL 5095. Experimental Design And Data Analysis. 3 Credit Hours.

The purpose of the course is to provide an introduction to experimental design and statistical analysis. The emphasis of the course will be on the selection and application of proper tests of statistical significance. Practical experience will be provided in the use of both parametric and nonparametric methods of statistical evaluation. Among the topics to be covered are: data reduction, types of distributions, hypothesis testing, scales of measurement, chi square analysis, the special case of the comparison of two groups; analysis of variance; a posteriori multiple comparisons tests, tests of the assumptions of parametric analyses, advanced forms of the analysis of variance, linear regression, and correlation analysis. This course involves the use of statistical software; therefore, access to a laptop or a computer with web access for classes and examinations is required.

CSBL 5083. Practical Optical Microscopy. 1 Credit Hour.

This course will be a one-hour elective for graduate students consisting of eight (8) one-hour lectures plus eight (8) one-hour laboratories. The course focuses on the practical aspects of using optical microscopes. The objectives are to teach students the fundamental principles of optical microscopy and to provide them with hands-on experience using the optical instrumentation in the Institutional Imaging Core.

CSBL 6021. Animal Models. 3 Credit Hours.

The relevant biology, applicability, and practical use of a number of animal models to biomedical research is covered. Invertebrate (e.g., C. elegans) and vertebrate (e.g., fish and rodents) model systems are included in the course. Strengths and weaknesses of each organism that render them particularly valuable as animal models are emphasized. Experimental approaches and tools that are utilized in conjunction with each animal model are rigorously examined. The course is taught from primary scientific literature using classic historical publications and recent publications.

CSBL 6048. Biology of Aging. 4 Credit Hours.

Biology of Aging is the core course of the Biology of Aging Track. The course consists of two modules: Aging and Longevity Mechanisms and Molecular and Cellular Mechanisms of Aging. The purpose of this course is to provide students with the most up-to-date information on the current understanding of the aging process. This advanced interdisciplinary graduate course provides experimental understanding of the interrelated areas of aging and age-related diseases. Faculty from several departments will be involved in teaching this course, which will cover the molecular and cell biology of aging, model systems used for aging studies, age-related changes in organs and tissues, and age-related diseases.

CSBL 6059. Stem Cells & Regenerative Medicine. 1 Credit Hour.

The fields of stem cells and regenerative medicine are rapidly evolving and have great potential to change the way medicine is practiced. This course will encompass topics from basics of tissue specific stem cell biology to pre-clinical animal models, strategies and progress in regenerative medicine. We will discuss some of the most current research being done in regenerative medicine from stem cell transplantation to biomaterials. Prerequisite: INTD 5000.

IBMS 5000. Fundamentals Of Biomedical Sciences. 8 Credit Hours.

This core course covers the fundamentals of biochemistry, molecular biology, cell biology, organismal and systems biology, and microbiology and immunology. The course is designed for first-year graduate students matriculating into the Integrated Biomedical Sciences Program (IBMS).

IBMS 5008. Lab Rotations. 1-3 Credit Hours.

This course provides an opportunity for students to participate in research activities in the laboratories of faculty members in different disciplines to learn laboratory skills and to gain an introduction to the research fields of faculty members.

IBMS 6090. Seminar. 1.5 Credit Hour.

This course is required of all students in the IBMS program, except of those who have signed up for Final Hours. Students are required to attend a minimum of 16 seminars per semester and to complete a requirement to demonstrate their attendance and participation. To fulfill the minimum number of seminars, students may include seminars offered by disciplines other than their own in which they are enrolled. However, to enroll, students should obtain permission from the course Section Director affiliated with the appropriate discipline. The course numbers of the individual course sections are IBMS 6090-1GEN, 6090-2BA, 6090-3CB, 6090-4CGM, 6090-5III, 6090-6MBB, 6090-7NS and 6090-8PP for the IBMS Disciplines: Biology of Aging (BA), Cancer Biology (CB), Cell Biology, Genetics & Molecular Medicine (CGM), Infections, Inflammation & Immunity (III), Molecular Biophysics & Biochemistry (MBB), Neuroscience (NS), and Physiology & Pharmacology (PP). Some students who have not declared a discipline, and have obtained the approval of their academic advisor and the Senior Associate Dean of the GSBS, may sign up for IBMS 6090-1GEN. A list of seminars from all disciplines will be posted on the Graduate School website. Each Section Director will determine, for the relevant IBMS-6090 section, the policy for tracking student's attendance and participation in seminars.

IBMS 6097. Research. 0.5-12 Credit Hours.

This course consists of independent, original research under the direction of a faculty advisor. Students should enroll in the research course section that corresponds to the most appropriate IBMS Disciplines: IBMS 6097-2BA for Biology of Aging (BA), IBMS 6097-3CB for Cancer Biology (CB), IBMS 6097-4CGM for Cell Biology, Genetics & Molecular Medicine (CGM), IBMS 6097-5III for Infections, Inflammation & Immunity (III), IBMS 6097-6MBB for Molecular Biophysics & Biochemistry (MBB), IBMS 6097-6NS for Neuroscience (NS), and IBMS 6097-7PP for Physiology & Pharmacology (PP). All students are required to meet with their research supervising committees at least once per semester. Students who have not declared a discipline should sign up for IBMS 6097-1GEN, General section.

IBMS 7001. Qualifying Exam. 1 Credit Hour.

The objective of the Qualifying Examination (QE) is to determine if a student has met programmatic expectations with regard to: i) Acquiring a level of scientific reasoning and a knowledge base in his/her field of study appropriate for a graduate student at the current stage of training; ii) Demonstrating skills of problem-solving and development of experimental strategies designed to test hypotheses associated with a specific scientific problem; and iii) Demonstrating the ability to defend experimental strategies proposed for solving scientific problems. Successful completion of the QE is required for Advancement to Candidacy and continuation in the IBMS Ph.D. program. During the Spring semester of Year 2 (4th semester overall) of the student's program, the QE will be administered by a faculty committee approved by a student's Discipline leadership. Each IBMS discipline will administer the QE process for its students so as to achieve the goals of the discipline while satisfying the expectations of the IBMS graduate program. In general, the QE requires the solving of a relevant unsolved problem in the biomedical sciences by writing a research proposal based on an idea conceived and developed by the student, followed by an oral defense-of-proposal to explore the student's problem-solving process, and the soundness of the student's experimental design. Following the QE, a report will be submitted by the chair of the examination committee to the student's discipline leadership indicating the outcome of the exam and any recommendations that may be required to foster further academic progress by the student. IBMS 7001 is divided into 7 modules overseen by the 7 IBMS Disciplines, each that is responsible for providing its students with a detailed description of the examination process, and for ensuring that the programmatic expectations and goals of the QE are met.

IBMS 7010. Student Journal Club & Research Presentation. 1-2 Credit Hours.

IBMS students should have continuous experience in: 1) discussion and critical analysis of current scientific literature (journal clubs) and, 2) formal presentation of their ongoing research progress to other students and faculty members of their discipline. A discipline-specific course or combination of courses that contains a semester minimum of 0.5 credit hours of scientific literature discussion and 0.5 credit hours of research presentation. This course will be a continuous requirement beginning the Fall semester of the second year until the preceding semester of the dissertation defense. At least once per academic year, students will provide a formal presentation of their research progress to other students and faculty members of their discipline. As well, they will contribute to journal club discussions of current scientific literature. Course will be sub-divided by Disciplines as follows: IBMS 7010-1GEN (General Section) IBMS 7010 -2BA (Biology of Aging) IBMS 7010 -3CB (Cancer Biology) IBMS 7010 -4CGM (Cell Biology, Genetics & Molecular Medicine) IBMS 7010 -5III (Infection, Inflammation & Immunity) IBMS 7010 -6MBB (Molecular Biophysics & Biochemistry) IBMS 7010 -7NS (Neuroscience) IBMS 7010-8PP (Physiology & Pharmacology).

IBMS 7099. Dissertation. 1-12 Credit Hours.

This course is designed to prepare graduate students writing their doctoral dissertation. A candidate for the Ph.D. degree must register for the Dissertation course for at least two terms. Students should enroll in the research course section that corresponds to the most appropriate IBMS discipline: IBMS Disciplines: IBMS 7099-2BA for Biology of Aging (BA), IBMS 7099-3CB for Cancer Biology (CB), IBMS 7099-4CGM for Cell Biology, Genetics & Molecular Medicine (CGM), IBMS 7099-5III for Infections, Inflammation & Immunity (III), 7099-6MBB for Molecular Biophysics & Biochemistry (MBB), IBMS 7099-6NS for Neuroscience (NS), and IBMS 7099-7PP for Physiology & Pharmacology (PP). Prerequisite: Registration is only permitted following a student's admission to candidacy for the Ph.D. degree, approval of the dissertation research proposal and approval of the membership of the candidate's Supervising Committee.

INTD 5040. Fundamentals Of Neuroscience1: Molecular, Cellular, & Developmental Neuroscience. 2 Credit Hours.

This course is intended to introduce students to a broad survey of the basics of molecular, cellular and developmental neuroscience. The course is organized into a series of three modules: biochemical and cellular properties of nervous system cells, development of neuronal systems, and neutrotransmission and neuromodulation, which covers the fundamentals of these three areas. Current topics and concepts are discussed in discussion sessions that include student participation. Two components; Neuroscience students register for both PHYL 5041 and INTD 5040.

INTD 5043. Fundamentals Of Neuroscience 2: Systems Neuroscience. 3 Credit Hours.

This course, the second component of our broad survey of the basics of neuroscience, begins at the level of the neural circuit, and guides the students through an understanding of increasingly complex levels of organization and function in the brain. Topics include neurotransmitter systems, sensory and motor function, motivated behavior, regulation and integration of autonomic, behavioral, and emotional responses in the limbic system, higher order cognitive processes, and the neurobiological basis underlying some important psychiatric disorders and their treatment.

INTD 6043. Structure & Function Of Membrane Proteins. 2 Credit Hours.

This is a course targeted at students within any of the Graduate Tracks. The objective is to provide a broad view, allowing for in depth consideration in selected areas, of the structure and diverse functions of proteins within a membrane environment. Specific topics covered will include: ion selective channels, large membrane pores, membrane transporters, membrane pumps, and membrane receptors. The format of the course will be didactic lecture followed by student presentations of relevant topics. Open for Cross Enrollment on Space Available basis.

INTD 7074. Topics In Translational Medical Product Development. 1 Credit Hour.

It is crucial to understand the intricate process of translating basic research into market driven products, navigate the complex pathways of intellectual property management and the regulatory affairs of agencies such as the FDA. This course will offer students in biomedical sciences the opportunity to integrate industry-relevant training and experience with their basic science education. The course will explore the marketing and regulatory process by which a biomedical product is developed and brought to commercialization.

PATH 5021. Biostatistics. 3 Credit Hours.

An introduction to Biostatistics, emphasis is upon application of statistical methods to biological problems. Topics include descriptive statistics, probability, hypothesis testing, and estimation.

PHAR 5018. Cardiovascular, Renal and Respiratory Physiology and Therapeutics. 2 Credit Hours.

This course covers the anatomy, physiology and pharmacology of the heart, the blood vessels, kidneys, and airways and lungs. Specific areas include: 1) normal physiology of the cardiovascular system and mechanisms underlying its major pathologies such as atherosclerosis, hypertension, heart failure and stroke, as well as the major classes of drugs (antihypertensives, anti-lipemics, anti-anginals, and anticoagulants) to treat these primary cardiovascular disorders. 2) importance of the kidneys in maintaining body electrolyte and water balance, and examples of cardiovascular and kidney diseases that are targets for important therapeutic drugs such as the diuretics and ACE inhibitors. 3) respiratory physiology and drugs used in the treatment of asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Prerequisites: INTD 5000 or equivalent.

PHAR 5019. Metabolism, Hormones, GI Physiology and Therapeutics. 2 Credit Hours.

This course provides an overview of the following: 1) physiology of major endocrine systems, including pituitary, thyroid, GI and renal hormones, etc. It covers endocrine regulation of stress, blood sugar, male and female fertility, calcium balance, growth, pregnancy, and appetite. Pharmacological approaches to management of diseases caused by defects in metabolism (e.g. diabetes) and hormonal regulation (e.g. thyroid disorders), as well as sex steroids and adrenal steroids, will be discussed. 2) mechanisms and regulation of digestion/acid secretion and nutrient absorption by the GI tract along with pharmacological management of GI diseases, including GERD, peptic, ulcer, etc. Prerequisites: INTD 5000 or equivalent.

PHAR 5091. Special Topics: Microelectives. 0.5-9 Credit Hours.

Micro-electives are courses that can be of any type (tutorial or original literature review, short [2-week] didactic, technique, etc.). In general, since they are short, they are often offered at any time of convenience between the student(s) and the faculty. Various topics include but not limited to: (1) New Views on Monoaminergic Neurotransmission: Are Transporters Important?; (2) Drug Discovery: Nuts and Bolts; (3) Historical Perspectives of Receptor Theory; (4) Cell Membrane Microdomains and Signaling; (5) Neuropeptide Metabolism; (6) Serotonin: From Soup (Transmission) to Nuts (Behavior); (7) Central-Cardio-Respiratory Systems; (8) Neural Substrates of Regulatory Behaviors: Peptides and Monoamines; (9) Current Issues in Basic Research on Mechanisms of Epilepsy; (10) Appetite Control: Adiposity Hormones and Neuropeptides; (11)Fundamentals of Behavioral Pharmacology; (12) Therapeutics: Autonomic Pharmacology; (13) Therapeutics: Cardiovascular-Renal Pharmacology (Prerequisite: PHAR 5091.012); (14) Therapeutics: Central Nervous System Pharmacotherapeutics; (15) Therapeutics: Chemotherapy: (16) Therapeutics: Endocrine Pharmacology: (17) Therapeutics: Pharmacological Management of Pain; and (18) G protein-coupled receptor heteromers.

TSCI 5070. Responsible Conduct Of Patient-Oriented Clinical Research. 2 Credit Hours.

This interdisciplinary course is designed to train participants in the responsible conduct of patient-oriented clinical research. Students will have the opportunity to learn to and, by the end of the course, be required to: (1) delineate a history of hallmark abuses of humans enrolled in clinical research; (2) describe the evolution of national and international codes and regulations guiding inclusion of human subjects in clinical investigations; (3) list the elements of informed consent and describe procedures and precautions for enrolling special populations into clinical investigation; (4) write a consent form in understandable language; (5) recognize different forms of scientific misconduct; (6) describe the role and processes of a peer review board to judge violations in research ethics; (7) develop strategies for self-assessment and validation of scientific objectivity in one's own research; and (8) recognize the ethical responsibilities and consequences of whistle blowing.