Neuroscience

Sample Plan of Study

First Year
FallCredit Hours
IBMS 5000Fundamentals Of Biomedical Sciences 8.0
IBMS 5008Lab Rotations 3.0
TSCI 5070Responsible Conduct Of Patient-Oriented Clinical Research 2.0
 Total Credit Hours: 13.0
First Year
SpringCredit Hours
CSBL 5095Experimental Design And Data Analysis 3.0
IBMS 6090Seminar (Class Section 7NS) 1.5
IBMS 6097Research (Class Section 7NS) § 3.5
IBMS 7010Student Journal Club & Research Presentation (Class Section 7NS) 1.0
INTD 5040Fundamentals Of Neuroscience1: Molecular, Cellular, & Developmental Neuroscience 2.0
PHYL 5041Excitable Membranes 1.0
Elective course(s) from a related discipline * variable
 Total Credit Hours: 12.0
Second Year
FallCredit Hours
IBMS 6090Seminar (Class Section 7NS) 1.5
IBMS 6097Research (Class Section 7NS) 1.5
IBMS 7010Student Journal Club & Research Presentation (Class Section 7NS) 1.0
INTD 5043Fundamentals Of Neuroscience 2: Systems Neuroscience 3.0
INTD 5047Neuroanatomy 2.0
PHAR 5020Basics Of Research Design 2.0
PHAR 5092Special Problems In Pharmacology: Research Practicum 1.0
 Total Credit Hours: 12.0
Second Year
SpringCredit Hours
IBMS 6090Seminar (Class Section 7NS) 1.5
IBMS 6097Research (Class Section 7NS) 8.5
IBMS 7001Qualifying Exam (Class Section 7NS) 1.0
IBMS 7010Student Journal Club & Research Presentation (Class Section 7NS) 1.0
Elective course(s) from a related discipline * variable
 Total Credit Hours: 12.0
Third Year
FallCredit Hours
IBMS 6090Seminar (Class Section 7NS) 1.5
IBMS 6097Research (Class Section 7NS) 9.5
IBMS 7010Student Journal Club & Research Presentation (Class Section 7NS) 1.0
Advanced Electives * variable
 Total Credit Hours: 12.0
Third Year
SpringCredit Hours
IBMS 6090Seminar (Class Section 7NS) 1.5
IBMS 6097Research (Class Section 7NS) 9.5
IBMS 7010Student Journal Club & Research Presentation (Class Section 7NS) 1.0
Advanced Electives * variable
 Total Credit Hours: 12.0
Fourth Year
FallCredit Hours
IBMS 6090Seminar (Class Section 7NS) 1.5
IBMS 6097Research (Class Section 7NS) 6.5
IBMS 7010Student Journal Club & Research Presentation (Class Section 7NS) 1.0
IBMS 7099Dissertation (Class Section 7NS) ** 3.0
Advanced Electives * variable
 Total Credit Hours: 12.0
Fourth Year
SpringCredit Hours
IBMS 6090Seminar (Class Section 7NS) 1.5
IBMS 6097Research (Class Section 7NS) * 6.5
IBMS 7010Student Journal Club & Research Presentation (Class Section 7NS) 1.0
IBMS 7099Dissertation (Class Section 7NS) ** 3.0
Advanced Electives * variable
 Total Credit Hours: 12.0
Fifth Year
FallCredit Hours
IBMS 6090Seminar (Class Section 7NS) 1.5
IBMS 6097Research (Class Section 7NS) 6.5
IBMS 7010Student Journal Club & Research Presentation (Class Section 7NS) 1.0
IBMS 7099Dissertation (Class Section 7NS) ** 3.0
Advanced Electives * variable
 Total Credit Hours: 12.0
Fifth Year
SpringCredit Hours
IBMS 6090Seminar (Class Section 7NS) 1.5
IBMS 6097Research (Class Section 7NS) 6.5
IBMS 7010Student Journal Club & Research Presentation (Class Section 7NS) 1.0
IBMS 7099Dissertation (Class Section 7NS) * 3.0
Advanced Electives * variable
 Total Credit Hours: 12.0
§

If additional laboratory rotations are required, research credit hours may be reduced accordingly in order to maintain a total of 12.0 SCH for the semester.

*

Recommended electives are shown below (minimum of 4 credit hours required prior to graduation). However, alternate electives can also be selected from any accredited courses offered at UT Health SA, but must be approved by the student's discipline director and the student's supervising professor. Research hours and elective credit hours can be adjusted as needed to maintain a total of 12 credit hours each semester. 
Recommended Electives

INTD 6033 Cellular Signaling Mechanisms

INTD 6041 Basic Science Resident Lecture Series in Neurology

INTD 6043 Membrane Proteins

INTD 6045 Clinical Practicum in Neuroscience

INTD 7074 Topics in Translational Medical Product Development

PHAR 5091 Microelectives (Seminar-style specialized courses)

PHAR 5091-1 Monoaminergic Neurotransmission and Transporters

PHAR 5091-2 Ion Channelopathies in Neurological Diseases

PHAR 5091-5 Neuropeptide Metabolism

PHAR 5091-6 Serotonin- Soup to Nuts

PHAR 5091-8 Neural Substrates of Regulated Behaviors

PHAR 5091-9 Current Issues in Research on Mechanisms of Epilepsy

PHAR 5091-10 Appetite Control: Adiposity Hormones & Neuropeptides

PHAR 5091-18 G protein-coupled receptor heteromers: pharmacological and physiological relevance

PHYL 6091 Selected Topics

PHYL 6091-2 Calcium Signaling

PHYL 6091-3 Cell Biology in Neural Science

PHYL 6091-7 Ion Channels in Disease

BIOC 5091 Special Topics in Biochemistry

BIOC 6035 Biochemistry of Multimolecular Complexes

BIOC 6010 Gene Expression

CSBL 6048 Biology of Aging

CSBL 6021 Animal Models

CSBL 6064 Genetics

PHAR 5013 Principles of Pharmacology

PHAR 6025 Molecular Pharmacology

PHAR 5020 Basics of Research Design

PHAR 6027 Fundamentals of Neuroethics

**

A minimum of 2 semesters of IBMS 7099-7NS (Dissertation) is required for graduation. A student may begin enrolling in IBMS 7099-7NS once the Dissertation Research Proposal and the Dissertation Supervising Committee membership are approval by the GSBS Dean. Final hours (3.0 SCH) may be applicable for the final semester.

Courses

BIOC 5091. Special Topics In Biochemistry: Hydrodynamic Methods. 1 Credit Hour.

This course is intended to provide students with the opportunity to gain a solid understanding of hydrodynamics and macromolecular transport processes, such as sedimentation and diffusion. The focus will be on hydrodynamic methods involving analytical ultracentrifugation and light scattering. Topics in sedimentation velocity, sedimentation equilibrium, buoyant density sedimentation, as well as static and dynamic light scattering and the complementarity of these approaches will be discussed. Macromolecular interactions involving mass action, concentration dependent nonideality, and reaction rates are covered. This course will also cover a range of data analysis approaches including the van Holde-Weischet method, the second moment method, direct boundary fitting by finite element modeling, the C(s) method, the 2-dimensional spectrum analysis, genetic algorithm optimization, nonlinear least squares fitting approaches to user-defined models. Statistical analysis using Monte Carlo and bootstrap methods also will be covered.

BIOC 6035. Drug Design And Discovery. 2 Credit Hours.

This course covers state-of-the-art approaches to the discovery and design of drugs - from small molecules to peptides - as well as drug delivery vehicles, with a strong emphasis on structure-based approaches. Topics to be covered will include the following: high-throughput screening, fragment based drug discovery, protein:protein and protein:ligand interactions, use of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR),surface plasmon resonance (SPR) and fluorescent methods in drug discovery, virtual (in silico) screening, peptides and peptidomimetics, structure based drug design, and use of macromolecular assemblies as drug delivery vehicles and as targets for drug therapy. Prerequisites: INTD 5000 Open for Cross Enrollment on Space Available basis.

BIOC 6010. Gene Expression. 2 Credit Hours.

The course covers gene expression focusing on regulation at the levels of transcription, RNA processing, transport and stability, and translation. Proteins and other regulatory molecules involved in these processes will also be covered. Particular emphasis will be placed on transcriptional control mechanisms including: RNA polymerases, chromatin remodeling, methylation and other epigenetic modifications, families of transcription factors including their DNA binding properties, protein-protein interaction domains, trans-activation mechanisms, regulation by ligand binding, phosphorylation and other signaling mechanisms and nuclear-cytoplasmic transport; posttranscriptional mechanisms including: mechanisms of RNA splicing, nuclear-cytoplasmic transport of RNA, RNA localization and targeting, RNA stability; and translational control. Post-transcriptional and translational control mechanisms will highlight the roles of RNA binding proteins and their modifications in these processes. Prerequisite: INTD 5000.

CSBL 5095. Experimental Design And Data Analysis. 3 Credit Hours.

The purpose of the course is to provide an introduction to experimental design and statistical analysis. The emphasis of the course will be on the selection and application of proper tests of statistical significance. Practical experience will be provided in the use of both parametric and nonparametric methods of statistical evaluation. Among the topics to be covered are: data reduction, types of distributions, hypothesis testing, scales of measurement, chi square analysis, the special case of the comparison of two groups; analysis of variance; a posteriori multiple comparisons tests, tests of the assumptions of parametric analyses, advanced forms of the analysis of variance, linear regression, and correlation analysis. This course involves the use of statistical software; therefore, access to a laptop or a computer with web access for classes and examinations is required.

CSBL 6021. Animal Models. 3 Credit Hours.

The relevant biology, applicability, and practical use of a number of animal models to biomedical research is covered. Invertebrate (e.g., C. elegans) and vertebrate (e.g., fish and rodents) model systems are included in the course. Strengths and weaknesses of each organism that render them particularly valuable as animal models are emphasized. Experimental approaches and tools that are utilized in conjunction with each animal model are rigorously examined. The course is taught from primary scientific literature using classic historical publications and recent publications.

CSBL 6048. Biology of Aging. 4 Credit Hours.

Biology of Aging is the core course of the Biology of Aging Track. The course consists of two modules: Aging and Longevity Mechanisms and Molecular and Cellular Mechanisms of Aging. The purpose of this course is to provide students with the most up-to-date information on the current understanding of the aging process. This advanced interdisciplinary graduate course provides experimental understanding of the interrelated areas of aging and age-related diseases. Faculty from several departments will be involved in teaching this course, which will cover the molecular and cell biology of aging, model systems used for aging studies, age-related changes in organs and tissues, and age-related diseases.

CSBL 6064. Genes & Development. 4 Credit Hours.

Genes and Development is the core course of the Genetics, Genomics, and Development Track. The course consists of four modules: genetics, genomics, developmental biology, and stem cell biology. Basic concepts in genetics such as cytogenetics, mitochondrial genetics, cancer genetics, linkage analysis, complex traits, population genetics, animal models, sex determination, and epigenetics will be presented. The genomics section will include historical aspects of the genome project and high throughput analysis. The students are introduced to new techniques in global analysis as well as have hands-on experience. The developmental biology section provides a survey of concepts in developmental biology (induction, cell-cell interactions, morphogen gradients, morphogenetic movements, transcriptional regulation, organogenesis) using experimental examples from both invertebrate and vertebrate embryos. The stem cell biology section includes the following topics: basic biology of stem cells, including embryonic stem cells, adult stem cells, stem cells in different tissues and model systems; microenvironment-mediated and epigenetic regulators of stem cells; stem cells in medicine, including regenerative medicine, cancer, and aging; and ethics. Required for the Genetics, Genomics & Development Track.

IBMS 5000. Fundamentals Of Biomedical Sciences. 8 Credit Hours.

This core course covers the fundamentals of biochemistry, molecular biology, cell biology, organismal and systems biology, and microbiology and immunology. The course is designed for first-year graduate students matriculating into the Integrated Biomedical Sciences Program (IBMS).

IBMS 5008. Lab Rotations. 1-3 Credit Hours.

This course provides an opportunity for students to participate in research activities in the laboratories of faculty members in different disciplines to learn laboratory skills and to gain an introduction to the research fields of faculty members.

IBMS 6090. Seminar. 1.5 Credit Hour.

This course is required of all students in the IBMS program, except of those who have signed up for Final Hours. Students are required to attend a minimum of 16 seminars per semester and to complete a requirement to demonstrate their attendance and participation. To fulfill the minimum number of seminars, students may include seminars offered by disciplines other than their own in which they are enrolled. However, to enroll, students should obtain permission from the course Section Director affiliated with the appropriate discipline. The course numbers of the individual course sections are IBMS 6090-1GEN, 6090-2BA, 6090-3CB, 6090-4CGM, 6090-5III, 6090-6MBB, 6090-7NS and 6090-8PP for the IBMS Disciplines: Biology of Aging (BA), Cancer Biology (CB), Cell Biology, Genetics & Molecular Medicine (CGM), Infections, Inflammation & Immunity (III), Molecular Biophysics & Biochemistry (MBB), Neuroscience (NS), and Physiology & Pharmacology (PP). Some students who have not declared a discipline, and have obtained the approval of their academic advisor and the Senior Associate Dean of the GSBS, may sign up for IBMS 6090-1GEN. A list of seminars from all disciplines will be posted on the Graduate School website. Each Section Director will determine, for the relevant IBMS-6090 section, the policy for tracking student's attendance and participation in seminars.

IBMS 6097. Research. 0.5-12 Credit Hours.

This course consists of independent, original research under the direction of a faculty advisor. Students should enroll in the research course section that corresponds to the most appropriate IBMS Disciplines: IBMS 6097-2BA for Biology of Aging (BA), IBMS 6097-3CB for Cancer Biology (CB), IBMS 6097-4CGM for Cell Biology, Genetics & Molecular Medicine (CGM), IBMS 6097-5III for Infections, Inflammation & Immunity (III), IBMS 6097-6MBB for Molecular Biophysics & Biochemistry (MBB), IBMS 6097-6NS for Neuroscience (NS), and IBMS 6097-7PP for Physiology & Pharmacology (PP). All students are required to meet with their research supervising committees at least once per semester. Students who have not declared a discipline should sign up for IBMS 6097-1GEN, General section.

IBMS 7001. Qualifying Exam. 1 Credit Hour.

The objective of the Qualifying Examination (QE) is to determine if a student has met programmatic expectations with regard to: i) Acquiring a level of scientific reasoning and a knowledge base in his/her field of study appropriate for a graduate student at the current stage of training; ii) Demonstrating skills of problem-solving and development of experimental strategies designed to test hypotheses associated with a specific scientific problem; and iii) Demonstrating the ability to defend experimental strategies proposed for solving scientific problems. Successful completion of the QE is required for Advancement to Candidacy and continuation in the IBMS Ph.D. program. During the Spring semester of Year 2 (4th semester overall) of the student's program, the QE will be administered by a faculty committee approved by a student's Discipline leadership. Each IBMS discipline will administer the QE process for its students so as to achieve the goals of the discipline while satisfying the expectations of the IBMS graduate program. In general, the QE requires the solving of a relevant unsolved problem in the biomedical sciences by writing a research proposal based on an idea conceived and developed by the student, followed by an oral defense-of-proposal to explore the student's problem-solving process, and the soundness of the student's experimental design. Following the QE, a report will be submitted by the chair of the examination committee to the student's discipline leadership indicating the outcome of the exam and any recommendations that may be required to foster further academic progress by the student. IBMS 7001 is divided into 7 modules overseen by the 7 IBMS Disciplines, each that is responsible for providing its students with a detailed description of the examination process, and for ensuring that the programmatic expectations and goals of the QE are met.

IBMS 7010. Student Journal Club & Research Presentation. 1-2 Credit Hours.

IBMS students should have continuous experience in: 1) discussion and critical analysis of current scientific literature (journal clubs) and, 2) formal presentation of their ongoing research progress to other students and faculty members of their discipline. A discipline-specific course or combination of courses that contains a semester minimum of 0.5 credit hours of scientific literature discussion and 0.5 credit hours of research presentation. This course will be a continuous requirement beginning the Fall semester of the second year until the preceding semester of the dissertation defense. At least once per academic year, students will provide a formal presentation of their research progress to other students and faculty members of their discipline. As well, they will contribute to journal club discussions of current scientific literature. Course will be sub-divided by Disciplines as follows: IBMS 7010-1GEN (General Section) IBMS 7010 -2BA (Biology of Aging) IBMS 7010 -3CB (Cancer Biology) IBMS 7010 -4CGM (Cell Biology, Genetics & Molecular Medicine) IBMS 7010 -5III (Infection, Inflammation & Immunity) IBMS 7010 -6MBB (Molecular Biophysics & Biochemistry) IBMS 7010 -7NS (Neuroscience) IBMS 7010-8PP (Physiology & Pharmacology).

IBMS 7099. Dissertation. 1-12 Credit Hours.

This course is designed to prepare graduate students writing their doctoral dissertation. A candidate for the Ph.D. degree must register for the Dissertation course for at least two terms. Students should enroll in the research course section that corresponds to the most appropriate IBMS discipline: IBMS Disciplines: IBMS 7099-2BA for Biology of Aging (BA), IBMS 7099-3CB for Cancer Biology (CB), IBMS 7099-4CGM for Cell Biology, Genetics & Molecular Medicine (CGM), IBMS 7099-5III for Infections, Inflammation & Immunity (III), 7099-6MBB for Molecular Biophysics & Biochemistry (MBB), IBMS 7099-6NS for Neuroscience (NS), and IBMS 7099-7PP for Physiology & Pharmacology (PP). Prerequisite: Registration is only permitted following a student's admission to candidacy for the Ph.D. degree, approval of the dissertation research proposal and approval of the membership of the candidate's Supervising Committee.

INTD 5040. Fundamentals Of Neuroscience1: Molecular, Cellular, & Developmental Neuroscience. 2 Credit Hours.

This course is intended to introduce students to a broad survey of the basics of molecular, cellular and developmental neuroscience. The course is organized into a series of three modules: biochemical and cellular properties of nervous system cells, development of neuronal systems, and neutrotransmission and neuromodulation, which covers the fundamentals of these three areas. Current topics and concepts are discussed in discussion sessions that include student participation. Two components; Neuroscience students register for both PHYL 5041 and INTD 5040.

INTD 5043. Fundamentals Of Neuroscience 2: Systems Neuroscience. 3 Credit Hours.

This course, the second component of our broad survey of the basics of neuroscience, begins at the level of the neural circuit, and guides the students through an understanding of increasingly complex levels of organization and function in the brain. Topics include neurotransmitter systems, sensory and motor function, motivated behavior, regulation and integration of autonomic, behavioral, and emotional responses in the limbic system, higher order cognitive processes, and the neurobiological basis underlying some important psychiatric disorders and their treatment.

INTD 5047. Neuroanatomy. 2 Credit Hours.

The purpose of this course is to provide students with a practical working knowledge of the structure of both the peripheral and central nervous system. The emphasis will be on the organization of the human brain, although the brains of other species may also be included if appropriate for a specific brain region. The course will look at each of the individual components of the central nervous system in some depth but will also emphasize the complex integration of these various components into a functional brain. The topics covered in the course are specifically designed to mesh in time with those covered in Fundamentals of Neuroscience 2 describing the function of these areas. For this reason, it would be best if these two courses were taken concomitantly. The course will be didactic with digital images, models, and wet specimens included in the course.

INTD 6033. Cell Signaling Mechanisms. 2 Credit Hours.

This course covers the molecular mechanisms of action of various extracellular mediators including hormones, neurotransmitters, growth factors, cytokines, etc., and cell signaling events. Several areas will be discussed including: (1) mechanisms of mediator synthesis; (2) interaction of mediators with specific receptors; (3) modulation by mediators of various second messenger systems including cyclic nucleotides, inositol phospholipids, calcium, protein phosphorylation, ion flux, etc.; and (4) intra- and intercellular mechanism for regulating mediator action. Open for Cross Enrollment on Space Available basis.

INTD 6041. Basic Science Resident Lecture Series In Neurology. 1.5 Credit Hour.

This is an interdisciplinary advanced elective in which students attend 20 lectures, selected from the full offering of daily one-hour lectures comprising the Neurology Residents' Basic Sciences lecture series. These lectures cover a range of topics, such as Epilepsy, Movement Disorders, the Thalamus, Parkinson's Disease, Alzheimer's Disease, Stroke, Sleep, etc., all given from a clinical perspective. In addition, graduate students will have the opportunity to observe or participate in at least two enrichment activities related topically to the lectures they attend, which may include such settings as case presentations, diagnostic training sessions, or clinical observations, again selected from the list of offerings included in the "Neurology Residents" series.

INTD 6043. Structure & Function Of Membrane Proteins. 2 Credit Hours.

This is a course targeted at students within any of the Graduate Tracks. The objective is to provide a broad view, allowing for in depth consideration in selected areas, of the structure and diverse functions of proteins within a membrane environment. Specific topics covered will include: ion selective channels, large membrane pores, membrane transporters, membrane pumps, and membrane receptors. The format of the course will be didactic lecture followed by student presentations of relevant topics. Open for Cross Enrollment on Space Available basis.

INTD 6045. Clinical Practicum In Neuroscience. 1 Credit Hour.

This course will provide students with a brief, but intense and very focused exposure to clinical practice in a relevant area of their choosing, designed and coordinated to best match their interests in close individual collaboration with a clinical mentor in one of the participating components: Neurosurgery, Neurology, Psychiatry, or Endodontics. Representative activities could include participation in case presentation and treatment planning, attending rounds with physicians and residents, direct observation of clinical procedures, patient interviews, follow-up care and outcome review. Potential venues may include inpatient psychiatric ward, sleep clinic, epilepsy clinic, stroke clinic, neurosurgical theater and surgical ICU. In consultation with the course director, students will first select one of the following sub-sections, then design their individually tailored clinical practicum experience with the coordinator for that section.

INTD 7074. Topics In Translational Medical Product Development. 1 Credit Hour.

It is crucial to understand the intricate process of translating basic research into market driven products, navigate the complex pathways of intellectual property management and the regulatory affairs of agencies such as the FDA. This course will offer students in biomedical sciences the opportunity to integrate industry-relevant training and experience with their basic science education. The course will explore the marketing and regulatory process by which a biomedical product is developed and brought to commercialization.

PHAR 5013. Principles Of Pharmacology & Physiology 1. 3 Credit Hours.

Topics include principles of drug action; receptor classification and quantitation; dose response relationships; cellular mechanisms of drug action; fundamental concepts of drug receptor interactions; voltage gated and ion channels; drug actions mediate by transduction and non-transduction enzymes; time course of drug action; absorption, distribution, biotransformation and elimination of drugs; pharmacokinetics; and experimental approaches to drug action.

PHAR 5020. Basics Of Research Design. 2 Credit Hours.

This course aims at teaching first-year graduate students fundamentals of research design and analysis of scientific literature to orient them with setting up scientific experiments and writing grant proposals. The course is divided into three sections: research design, communicating scientific data, and getting scientific ideas funded.

PHAR 5091. Special Topics: Microelectives. 0.5-9 Credit Hours.

Micro-electives are courses that can be of any type (tutorial or original literature review, short [2-week] didactic, technique, etc.). In general, since they are short, they are often offered at any time of convenience between the student(s) and the faculty. Various topics include but not limited to: (1) New Views on Monoaminergic Neurotransmission: Are Transporters Important?; (2) Drug Discovery: Nuts and Bolts; (3) Historical Perspectives of Receptor Theory; (4) Cell Membrane Microdomains and Signaling; (5) Neuropeptide Metabolism; (6) Serotonin: From Soup (Transmission) to Nuts (Behavior); (7) Central-Cardio-Respiratory Systems; (8) Neural Substrates of Regulatory Behaviors: Peptides and Monoamines; (9) Current Issues in Basic Research on Mechanisms of Epilepsy; (10) Appetite Control: Adiposity Hormones and Neuropeptides; (11)Fundamentals of Behavioral Pharmacology; (12) Therapeutics: Autonomic Pharmacology; (13) Therapeutics: Cardiovascular-Renal Pharmacology (Prerequisite: PHAR 5091.012); (14) Therapeutics: Central Nervous System Pharmacotherapeutics; (15) Therapeutics: Chemotherapy: (16) Therapeutics: Endocrine Pharmacology: (17) Therapeutics: Pharmacological Management of Pain; and (18) G protein-coupled receptor heteromers.

PHAR 5092. Special Problems In Pharmacology: Research Practicum. 1-9 Credit Hours.

This is a full-semester research experience for the principal investigator to evaluate if a student demonstrates the potential for productive and independent investigation during the summer following the first year. The course concludes with a 15 minute oral presentation given by the student and a written report in a journal style.

PHAR 6025. Molecular Pharmacology. 2 Credit Hours.

This course will be presented in a journal club/paper discussion format and will focus on the molecular aspects of pharmacology, with emphasis on molecular biology, biochemistry, and cell biology of a variety of physiological systems subjected to pharmacological manipulation. The topics to be discussed will include molecular mechanisms of drug action, signal transduction and regulation, molecular approaches, and recent advances in areas of molecular pharmacology.

PHAR 6027. Fundamentals Of Neuroethics. 1 Credit Hour.

Recent advances in neuroscience have considerably improved our understanding of brain function. However, the fascinating examination of brain's mysteries often intersects with the concerns of ethics and public policy. This course aims at presenting and discussing philosophical and scientific perspectives on major bioethical issues pertinent to neuroscience research. Several subjects will be covered in the course, including the effects of pharmacological and surgical interventions on the brain/min binomial, therapy versus enhancement, brain imaging and mental privacy, neurobiology of decision making, consciousness, unconsciousness, and death.

PHYL 5041. Excitable Membranes. 1 Credit Hour.

This course addresses fundamental mechanisms of cell excitability in neurons and other excitable tissues. The format is a combination of lectures, readings, discussions, a laboratory demonstration, and online simulations (where available). Examples of the latter include activities to simulate the resting membrane potential and action potentials. The module will emphasize contemporary issues in the scientific literature as well as translational science where dysfunction in ion channels underlie common disorders such as Alzheimer's Disease, Myasthenia Gravis, Cystic Fibrosis, Long QT Syndrome, and Epilepsy to name just a few. PHYL 5041 is a co-requisite for Fundamentals of Neuroscience I as it is the first module of that course, but it also can be taken as a standalone one-hour course.

PHYL 6091. Selected Topics Of Physiology. 2 Credit Hours.

Students must take a least two courses selected from among the offerings in:(1) Cardiovascular; (2) Cell Biology in Neural Science; (3) Endocrine and Metabolism; (4) Molecular Physiology; and (5) Ion Channels in Disease. Courses that may be substituted for one of these selections: (1) INTD 5040 - Fundamentals of Neuroscience I: Molecular, Cellular, and Developmental Neuroscience; (2) INTD 5043 - Fundamentals of Neuroscience II: Systems Neuroscience; (3) CSBL 6048 - Biology of Aging; and (4) CSBL 6058 - Neurobiology of Aging. Not all selected topics are offered each semester. Please discuss this with the Academic Coordinator for more details. Substituted courses in conflict with Physiology course schedule will require approval from COGS.

TSCI 5070. Responsible Conduct Of Patient-Oriented Clinical Research. 2 Credit Hours.

This interdisciplinary course is designed to train participants in the responsible conduct of patient-oriented clinical research. Students will have the opportunity to learn to and, by the end of the course, be required to: (1) delineate a history of hallmark abuses of humans enrolled in clinical research; (2) describe the evolution of national and international codes and regulations guiding inclusion of human subjects in clinical investigations; (3) list the elements of informed consent and describe procedures and precautions for enrolling special populations into clinical investigation; (4) write a consent form in understandable language; (5) recognize different forms of scientific misconduct; (6) describe the role and processes of a peer review board to judge violations in research ethics; (7) develop strategies for self-assessment and validation of scientific objectivity in one's own research; and (8) recognize the ethical responsibilities and consequences of whistle blowing.